Pigs with other creatures on pasture

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by tbishop, May 26, 2006.

  1. tbishop

    tbishop Well-Known Member

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    I've been very impressed with the wild flock system presented by George and others here. I'm wondering if anyone knows if having pigs mixed with other species can cause problems during lambing or kidding season? I am concerned that pigs would be drawn in by the scent of the birthing and attack a young one before it could effectively get away. Just a concern that popped into my head. Any opinions would be appreciated.

    Tim B.
     
  2. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Do NOT, under any circumstances have pigs in the same paddock as animals about to give birth and this includes the larger animals such as cows and horses. I cannot stress that strongly enough.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     

  3. tbishop

    tbishop Well-Known Member

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    See that's what I thought too. I just wanted to make sure I was on the right track.

    Tim B.
     
  4. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

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    I can tell you...pigs eat baby goats.
     
  5. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    There you are then, you thought right and are very much on the right track.
    NZ farmers lose 1,000's of lambs annually to feral pigs for the reason that you were concerned about.

    While the barnyard concept of keeping animals is all very nice, it does need some thought and often a little research. For example, cattle and pigs make good paddock mates but pigs are also the number one reason for Lepto in cattle so it makes good sense to keep them seperate. I keep pigs, beef cattle, dairy cows, sheep and a few poultry but the pigs have their own section of the farm with the exception of one and she shares a paddock with my rams and a pet weather.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  6. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    yes pigs will hunt. I have pig excluders on certain pastures and shelters so the sheep can have a pig free zone. Thankfully pigs aren't very good at jumping whereas sheep are
     
  7. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    I have a friend who lost several calves, and a cow/calf pair (cow was delivering) to feral pigs in Texas. It was a large herd (?) of them that eventually had to be hunted down, due to the tremendous losses of livestock in the area. These were huge, I believe the name is Limousine, cattle.


    niki
     
  8. tbishop

    tbishop Well-Known Member

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    After reading this, I can see that some separation is needed. Matt Elston from Cascade Meadows Farms also responded to my questions. He said that a gentleman from Missouri named Kevin runs his pigs in a moveable cattle panel enclosure that is bent to create an 8'X4' pen that has sheet metal over half for shelter. the corners are weighed down with rocks and the hogs move it as they root around. I apologize if this has been posted before. It's such a great idea!

    Tim B.
     
  9. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    Sounds interesting! I'm having trouble visualizing it? I'd love to hear more - I would like to give my pigs some more room - they seem to enjoy the grass so much.

    niki
     
  10. tbishop

    tbishop Well-Known Member

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    Here's the quote from Matt- "Kevin in Missouri, uses two hog panels bent in an L shape to graze his American Guinea Hogs. By bending two 12' panels he can easily make an 8'x4' pen that his hogs move around by themselves (he keeps them headed in the right direction). They are not anchored to the ground, but weighed down on each corner with a rock or cinder-block. A piece of corrugated roofing over one end provides the shelter."

    I personally would want a bigger space, but one could certainly adapt the basic concept.

    Tim B.
     
  11. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    We are currently doing an experiment with a crude but simple portable pig grazing cell. We took a steel round bale ring. Then we cut a piece of welded wire (similar to woven hogwire) that makes a complete circle inside the bale ring. We attached wire to bale ring with plastic 6" long Zip-Ties used by mechanics for bundling electrical wire on tractors and bulldozers. We have a cheap blue tarp covering 1/2 of roof and down one side for shade and rain.
    We currently have a 220 pound gilt who is doing quite well with it. We walk it side to side onto new grass daily, also feed milk and a little bit of corn. Yes she totally destroys sod in that circle daily. We figure this is helping her get minerals naturally, so let her do it as opposed to ringing her nose.
    It is working well, only that it is a bit heavy and hard to move, and limited in size to one pig(or 2-3 small feeders till they get to 75 lbs.) I have thought that one of the Aluminum Round bale rings would probably be moved easily, but perhaps the pig could flip that as they are very light. Haven't tried that variation yet.
     
  12. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    Wow, that is really interesting! Hog panels around here are 16' long, which would make a slightly bigger pen. Too heavy for me to move, if the pigs would do it themselves that would be perfect! Guinea hogs are pretty small and low key, so I wonder how this would work with bigger ones. Maybe for butcher hogs it would be OK. I don't understand how the rocks or blocks are used. Do the pigs inch along or does he remove the rocks and entice them to move it in one big push once a day? Do they root up the sod or just eat the grass? Can you find out more, Tim?

    Mine are in a 40x40' enclosure and like to race around in circles now and then. They'd miss doing that and I'd miss watching them! :p
     
  13. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    Don't you just love to see the running?! They are such fun to watch. My hog panels are 16' too. We do have shorter ones, at the same length - I wonder if I used three of them (one clipped in half to eight feet), if I could move it? Shorter, as in 'not as tall', but still 16ft long. I think they are maybe three feet tall?

    Dh and I have been pondering all week. We have two weaners the same size, and one little weaner gilt that I bought later, she is about half their size. We want them out on the pasture, and don't mind them rooting. I can get water to them for drinking, but the soil is so sandy I am worried about their wallow. It gets HOT here - supposed to be 104 today. I'm also worried about not knowing which weeds are poisenous. Mostly bermuda but have two types of weeds out there and am not sure what they are. One is tall and kind of fuzzy (not mullein that I know of), and the other is greyish white, with purple flowers, and yellow berries (no berries yet, but that's what eventually happens!).

    niki
     
  14. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    Well, I woke up from a nap today and dh had the piglets moved! He cut the sixteen foot panels.... :Bawling: into eight foot sections -so they are in an 8x8 pen. It'll be enough for awhile - they weigh around fifty pounds each. Then we'll have to elongate the sides to 16', with a width of 8 foot. I just hate cutting those panels - they cost $40 each here.

    They seem happy, haven't really rooted around yet. They are under a cottonwood tree for shade, but we can put up a piece of tin after we move them. We removed the gray-green weeds with purple flowers (nightshade) and left the fuzzyish ones.

    Guess he got all motivated......while I just got some z's. :) He even gave my bucks some shade!

    Niki
     
  15. Terry W

    Terry W Duchess of Cynicism

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    This is known as a "tractor" - Joel Salatin uses them, Lot's of tractor info on line-- and has been mentioned wuite often on the ppoultry forum-- checkthem out! .you can "tractor" pigs and other small livestock--especially of the type that need protecting from large or flying predators. I have a tractor in process for my hens and guineas , due here in two weeks> I will be building one for rabbits, as well. Condsider a "tractor a way to feed your animal, fertilize the soil, and in some cases, till it! much smaller than a paddock, and if you don't have a lot of time or must use portable fencing, a lot faster than moving fence!
     
  16. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    The piglets seem happy in their 'tractor'. We will put up a piece of tin on the south side to provide shade for the middle of the day - the trees shade east/west. I think we will be making a second one for the little gilt. I wish I could just let them run in the pasture - but it isn't entirely enfenced in hotwire. YET, lol.

    niki
     
  17. tbishop

    tbishop Well-Known Member

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    You know- I've read the Salatin book in part and never thought to apply the idea to hoof stock. Hmmmm... sheep, pigs, small cattle, hmm.....
     
  18. highlands

    highlands Well-Known Member

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    We keep our pigs, sheep, ducks and chickens all on the same pastures. I do move the sheep to a different paddock when they are going to drop lambs. Works fine. The ram and boar are best buddies.
     
  19. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    When I kept the pigs in pens in Florida and they cleared and cleaned the garden for me, I'd use 16' combo panels held together with 3/4 inch hose clamps. The panels hold themselves upright if they have at least two posts somewhere in the configuration. (an 8 x8 set up doesn't need anything) Mine rotated around their main pen. Once they know you, your pigs won't want to get away form you so you don't need to move the whole thing. You can take down one wall at a time and reposition it- then get them back inside.
     
  20. HeatherDriskill

    HeatherDriskill Well-Known Member

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    I am confused. If anyone has pics of their tractoring setup, I would love to see them.