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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know pigs have been used to assist in Kudzu control in some areas, has anyone on here tried it and how many pigs per acre did you use? What kind of results did you have? The old farm we just bought has an old field that is about 2 acres of kudzu. Based on the research I have done, my plan it to remove the top layers of vines and vegetation by burning, then disk the area, fence it an put pigs on it in the spring. Though I have read some info that this is a successful technique there is not much info that I have been able to find concerning stocking density of the pigs. Thanks in advance for your help!
 

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Living the dream.
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Rather than sending up all that biomass in smoke. Why don't you run goats on it? The goats will turn all that top growth into good meat and manure. Once the goats get it worked down, then introduce the pigs to start digging up the roots. I can't give you a scientific number, but stocking densities for quick control of invasives tend to be high. If you want it done fast, you will have to be ready to pull some of the animals off and supply supplemental feed to the remaining animals to keep them working on the last bits. Or if you are satisfied with just a slow methodical control, you can use stocking rates closer to the "sustainable levels". I'd go slow myself unless I had a defined way to get rid of the extra animals (you can only eat so much meat). So here is my stab at it:

Fast Control
10 goats and 5 feeder pigs (or 10 pigs with no goats) could probably knock it out pretty fast, maybe 60-90 days. If you want is faster yet, add more.

Slow Control
5 goats and 2 pigs (or 4-5 pigs with no goats), just guessing but they may be able to make a spring/summer/fall out of it.

Either way, the pigs will need some feed if you expect them to grow much while clearing. The goats will probably be fine unless they are milking heavily.
 

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The pigs will only control some of the kudzu as it can have the tubers as much as ten feet below the surface of the ground. with that being said it will be more than one growing season process to eradacate all of the kudzu. You should use Silvercreeks' method and then plan on coming back with a herbicide for complete control.
 

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kudzu is very edible to most all livestock I have found, goats sheep cattle rabbits chickens and I am sure pigs, its very good feed high in protein, I would use as much of the live vine to feed what ever you decide to raise
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks all, I am very familiar with invasive control with herbicide, but am looking at something a little less heavy handed for this project. It is an older well established patch on fertile soil. I am thinking of a stocking density of 20 to 30 hogs, it just seems that there are several studies out there that talk about it but none seem to get real specific on numbers and success, based on the replies here and other things I have learned, it may well be because it is not that successful. I may just wind up going with the good old spray, burn, spray method to get it under control and then graze it. Thanks again for the info.
 

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I have seen it successfully controlled with a heard of cattle place on it. A well established, pecan tree eating patch. They cleaned it up pretty fast. It would surely work better to follow the cattle with swine, I would think.
 
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