pigglets arrived today

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by countrygurl, Dec 18, 2004.

  1. countrygurl

    countrygurl Well-Known Member

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    southwest mississippi
    our 10 little pigglets arrive today, 7 weeks old how would they hold up in cold weather low 20's i have some hay in thier pen side walls to block the wind i have a drop light for heat will they be ok
    donna
     
  2. Snowdancer

    Snowdancer Well-Known Member

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    They're going to need some very deep bedding to burrow in as well as good protection from wind and dampness. The heat light/drop light should be a 250watt infrared type if possible, but a clear bulb 250 watt will work.

    Good luck, little pigs are the cutest critters!!
     

  3. Mulefoot

    Mulefoot Active Member

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    Iowa
    As KY Guest said, deep bedding is very important. When you think you have enough in their pen, add some more. They can and will burrow in deep enough that all you see is their noses. But they will be fine, the supplemental heat is an added bonus.

    It is 0 outside here this morning with a windchill running in the -15 to -25 range. I'm heading outside to see how the animals fared.

    Take care.
     
  4. jejabean

    jejabean Well-Known Member

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  5. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Staff Member Supporter

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    I wouldn't worry about low 20's temps. Ours do fine even in our extreme cold here in Vermont. It gets down to -45F for spells - that's before accounting for wind chill.

    The two most important things are protection from the wind and a deep pack bedding. Don't clean out their bedding area. Just keep adding more hay. Ours snuggle down in the hay. They also eat the hay. The composting hay provides warmth and doesn't freeze.

    After those two things I would suggest a roof to keep them out of the rain/snow and protect them from the night sky. It is warmer under a roof than under the open sky. Plenty of food is important, they'll turn the calories into heat.

    Good ventilation is very important. Don't close them in. Rather give them a place they can go into and let them go out when they want into a yard for the winter. We use garden corrals for the snowed in season and let them out on pasture when it is available.

    Sleeping together they share warmth. I wouldn't worry about having a heat lamp.

    -Walter
    in Vermont