Pig Roundup

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by pointer_hunter, Oct 13, 2004.

  1. pointer_hunter

    pointer_hunter Well-Known Member

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    May 8, 2004
    Location:
    Michigan
    Came in to work tonight and a co-worker started in on a story. I guess someone went on to a pig farm next to his in-laws and let out 30 pigs. The farmer says he can't get them back, so he told him that he'd cut his losses and let my co-worker shoot them. He said they already got one, but they can't seem to find the others. They can see the trails they're making in the corn fields though. I told him that if they still needed them gone to call me and I'd be happy to help. I can see a possible "wild boar hunt" for free! :D

    I guess my question is this.....why wouldn't the farmer be able to gather up some of his pigs? If it were me, I'd do just about anything short of killing all my pigs to get them back. Are they really that hard to catch again?
     
  2. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    Clarksville TN.
    Umm they could be.They don't leed very good and loading them with out a shoot would be the real fun part.We never had any luck getting them to go where we wanted them,at least not with out food.And that was real slow once they new something was up.You just cant force them to do anything unless there small enough that you can over power them.

    After reading someones post on here a month or so ago.About loading pigs in a trailer.I got tickled and had to call my mom to talk about old times and my grandfathers pig that wouldn't load.Or even move for that matter.
    Nothing on this earth can be more stubborn.

    Boy a pig hunt does sound fun! :D
     

  3. pointer_hunter

    pointer_hunter Well-Known Member

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    Michigan
    The one that has already been shot weighed in at 300+ lbs. I guess I can see why he wrote them off as a loss.
     
  4. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Humans can't drive hogs anywhere they don't want to go, but a good stock dog can very quickly give them an attitude ajustment that makes them decide that was where they wanted to go after all. I've seen a collie dog bring an old sow out of a standing corn field and put her right back through the hole in the fence where she got out. We had run her and several others right past that hole several times before we called the stray collie mix and the rat terrier dogs out to the field. The collie would clamp down on their ears, and the rat terrier would stay behind making ham sandwiches. Those hogs knew exactly where they were supposed to go.
     
  5. dla

    dla Well-Known Member

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    Damascus, Maryland
    We are already wondering what kind of dog to choose when our wonderful shepherd goes on.
    Will collie and collie mixes be a help without a lot of training? I mean, getting chickens back in the coop at night, retrieving loose pigs (let's hope not 200 pounders!) and stuff.
    I heard that collies tend to be nervous. After my worrysome shepherd, I'd like a helpful but CALM dog.
     
  6. LuckyGRanch

    LuckyGRanch Well-Known Member

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    Jun 30, 2002
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    Polk Co Wisconsin
    I absolutely LOVE my 2 year old Border Collie. I have no idea how to "train" herding dogs but, we've just trained her to do what we need her to do. She'll help us with the ducks, geese, goats, sheep....hadn't thought of the pigs though! We'll be loading 2 pigs on Nov. 4th and I'm already worried about getting them to cooperate. We'll just call "Suzie"! :haha:

    Suzie is definitely not CALM! :eek: But, she's certainly not a nervous dog either. She's just very, very ready to work at a moments notice. :worship: She's so sweet and loves to please.
     
  7. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Stock dogs are born with the herding instinct. I don't aim to say which of these are best, but the Border collie is one of the prettiest, and is born knowing more than you could ever train breeds to do that weren't bred to herd animals.
    We used to have collies years ago that looked like Lassy, but I don't see them much anymore. They were good around a farm because they knew where all the animals were supposed to be, and took it upon themselves to see that they stayed there. They would go long distances to bring home a herd of milk cows at milking time by themselves. I've seen several that only had to be told, "Get the cows" and they took off on a dead run and the cows didn't dispute their athority. The Border Collies are more talented when it came to working stock, and putting them into a small pen or gate.
    I have a neighbor who had a Border Collie, and he hired a woman to train him to handle sheep. The dog soon was doing whatever she wanted him to, but she didn't train the old man who owned him. He brought him home but the dog didn't have any idea what he wanted him to do. The man kept a small flock of sheep to keep the large barn lots mowed. Every time he walked out that way, the dog jumped the fence and put the sheep in the barn then stood watch at the door until the old man went away.
    There is an old saying that you have to be as smart as the dog to teach it anything.