Pig poo. Just HOW gross?

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by midkiffsjoy, Dec 22, 2005.

  1. midkiffsjoy

    midkiffsjoy Bedias, Texas

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    Okay....All my daughter wants in the WHOLE WORLD is a pig (okay a pig and a horse). She has come to terms that we'd be raising it to eat (she says she LOVES bacon). I know my parents had pigs when I was a kid (according to my mom because when I was little ALL I wanted in the WHOLE WORLD was pigs) and have heard horror stories about how the pigs were ALWAYS getting out and how they STINK. I'm reading all I can get my hands on and planning on starting sometime this spring as my chickens and goats are taking up all my time right now, and I HAVE to ask JUST how sticky IS their poo???? I have to decide WHERE to build the pig pens (read - WHICH NEIGHBOR's fenceline to build it on) and mom says they smell toxic. Just HOW bad could a couple of pigs get????

    Thanks!
     
  2. Misty

    Misty Misty Gonzales

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    a couple won't be too bad at all....
     

  3. flowerpower

    flowerpower Member

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    When pig poop gets wet- it stinks bad.
     
  4. jersey girl

    jersey girl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Give the pigs a large area and they will go in the same area all the time. Makes cleaning easier. Also, haul several tons of sand in for the pen. We have always given our pigs their own litter box with sand. Its easy to clean, keeps the pigs cleaner and is easier on their feet and legs than all dirt.
     
  5. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Buy two - they'll do better and she won't get as attached. Also buy her a shovel. Pigs tend to soil one corner of their area and they're easier to clean up after than goats by a mile. Feed grass as part of their diet and spread agricultural lime and DE in their area. The smell should barely be noticeable. Pigs will smell when they wallow in their urine and feces to cool down in cramped quarters and when they're not given a clean wallowing hole with fresh water. I kept a dozen wild pigs in Florida and I didn't even have a fly problem - no smell at all. My pigs had shiny clean coats and I fed grass with roots and all, grains, and limited household scraps, mainly vegetable and fruit peelings and stale bread.
     
  6. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    As above, make sure that there is a big enough space for them and they will use one or two particular areas for a bathroom. We are organic farmers and we don't have a better source of compost fertilizer for our garden! Bring in a few round bales of straw and spread it liberally over the bathroom areas. The carbon in the straw will absorb most noticeable odour and moisture. You can go ahead and let it pile up and compost in-place and then take a bigger load to your gardens once or twice a year. Alternatively, you can shovel out the poop and straw daily into a bigger compost pile somewhere else on your property.

    do a search here on fencing. Pigs are as easy to keep in as any other animal. We have had much more of a problem with horses as we have had with our pigs. Posts eight foot on centre, farm fencing with the small squares down and boards across the bottom are all we use. Many others have different, effective methods of fencing.
     
  7. catahoula

    catahoula Well-Known Member

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    We kept two pigs in a fenced off area next to our barn I built a little leanto shelter for shade. I bolted a nipple style waterer and a feed trough to the side of the barn. They rooted up the pasture grass in short order, after that I put out straw and old hay to keep them off of the mud. Once a day with a shovel and a wheel barrow kept things pretty nice for them. I think that once they are on a stable diet whith lots of fiber the poop isn't so greasy/sticky it's sort of like dog poop it's never really a pellet like goats.
    I recomend electric fencing it's cheap easy to put up, move, and take down. Electricity put the fear of God in my pigs, as well as myself. I think we all have an electric fence story. Pigs are just plain old fun to watch, I think you'll like them. Good luck
     
  8. GeorgiaberryM

    GeorgiaberryM Well-Known Member

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    I have been very surprised by how pleasant our pig pen is - never stinky, unless as others have mentioned, it gets really wet. Since we are in a rain deficit of 17 inches for 2005, it hasn't been a problem (every cloud has a silver lining?). We have never scooped out any poop, and they do go in one spot, the "latrine," we call it.

    And our kids love the pigs! They are very interesting and quite humorous animals, but by butchering time I think they will be so big that a kid will find them hard to relate to in a pet kind of way. At this point our kids still like to watch the pigs, but at a distance, as they are pretty intimidating animals.
     
  9. midkiffsjoy

    midkiffsjoy Bedias, Texas

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    Giggle. My kids have grown up with my mom's Malamutes, so they are used to REALLY BIG pets. grin. And I think most of us have had a horse or two in our time. I read that someone raises a weiner pig in there fenced in garden after it was done in the fall through winter and then by spring their garden was nice and turned and covered in "fertilizer" grin. I built mom a fenced in 110' x 150' garden that she doesnt use all of and she and I are now talking about cutting it in half and raising a pig in one side and then switching pens. Always have a garden, always have a pig. The best part is that it'd be in the MIDDLE of 145 acres and no one could smell a thing no matter HOW bad. (and if her only neighbors did then theyd need to get a look at THEIR yards FIRST!!!!) GRIN. I'm all about building a raised pig shed (portable of course) and "pig patio" as the book called. Growing up on a cattle ranch, I'm used to building livestock equipment (feeders, barns, and the like). Either way....after raising a couple of weiner pigs I'm sure I'll know if I want to venture into breeding our own. grin. giggle. (I'm new to goats so pellet poo is kinda weird. I'm used to cow poo.....big messy SPLATS that I collect for my garden. giggle. I had such FUN teaching the kids the difference between GOOD poo and poo that needed to dry out some more. giggle)
     
  10. ErinC

    ErinC Well-Known Member

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    Haha, pigs are great! We really had fun with them...Make sure to get the un-pink ones, like a Duroc or something...They're less hyper, and get at least two, because they get lonely. Make sure to put them as far downwind from the neighbors as you can. They don't smell as bad as they're cracked up to, but it's not like Lilacs or Roses or something...
     
  11. tenacres

    tenacres Well-Known Member

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    We raised our first pigs this past summer/fall and loved it! When we first got them at 9 weeks old, my son kept saying that he wanted us to keep them and not eat them. They are VERY cute when they are young! But as others have said when your looking at a 250 lbs pig, the appeal is a bit different. We loaded them up on December 6th (not an easy task) and took them to the packing plant. The kids (ages 8 and 10) havent had any problem eating the meat.....especially the bacon. We've been so pleased that we are planning on raising 4 come May.

    As far as the poo......it gets REALLY bad when wet! When we first got them, I went into the pen and scooped it out regularly but as fall came and they got so big that they practically knocked me over, I started sliding on the cleaning. Then came early snow in September......making things wet. YUCK! I also used an animal stall deoderizer (Zeolite) that helped make things smell better.
     
  12. ErinC

    ErinC Well-Known Member

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    Oooh, I also forgot to say: Get them right after the snow is gone, eat em' mid July, this way the stink won't be too awful - Tenacres is right! The dampness makes for a smelly nightmare.
     
  13. midkiffsjoy

    midkiffsjoy Bedias, Texas

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    Snow??? What is this SNOW that people keep talking about???? Giggle. I think the last time it snowed here I was about 8. Chris (3) has never seen snow, and Katie's (5) only seen snow once...when we buried Pa, in NJ, in January (I was amazed they were able to dig the hole. They said most time they stick everyone in a shed till Spring and then bury everyone when the ground isnt frozen solid) Christmas day it was a wonderfully warm 73 !!! I could handle it like this year round. grin. Thanks all!!!!
     
  14. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    We raise ours outside in hog panels. Easy to put up and it holds them well. Make it a good size and it wont be a problem. I have noticed no smell , and they till the land well. A simple lean to shelter will do.
     
  15. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    My pen is four 20-foot horse panels in the pasture with a T-post in the center of each panel. The corners are tied together with baling wire. Shelter is an A-frame.

    Pigs sleep outside unless it is cold and raining, snowing or such. I go to the cattle left-overs, the sedge and weeds the cattle will not eat, fork it onto the trailer and thence into the pen. Pigs dote on it. The latrine corner is just that, the feed corner is dry, the water corner is muddy and the shelter looks as if it is ready for company; they never foul it. The two pigs are eating about 12-l5 pounds of feed daily now, and eating more each week. I really need a bigger feeder.
    Ox
     
  16. MillsFarmFamily

    MillsFarmFamily Well-Known Member

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    My kids have 4-H pigs (only 3 months/year). Each year our pigs' favorite "potty corner" is usually right in front of the gate to their pen. If this happens, just shovel it to another area and they should start "going" in the new area. They only really stink right after a good rain.