pig fencing help

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by blindhen, Apr 26, 2006.

  1. blindhen

    blindhen Member

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    can anyone give me some sound advice on pig fencing? we are getting ready to fence in an area for our first pig to be butchered this fall. so, it's a temporary area...one that we want rooted up. our budget didn't allow for electric fencing so we have sturdy woven wire fencing but we're getting different opinions on putting the fencing up in the best way to keep the pig from rooting it's way out.
    so..we're being told to bury the fence 8inches. we're being told to make it level with the ground. we're being told to ring the pigs snout but as i said, we are looking for it to root up this area. any advice on keeping the pig in the woven wire fence...if it got out and rooted up my flower/vegetable gardens i'd be a sad lady.
    thanks for any help you can give!!!
     
  2. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    a couple methods...I'm sure other folks will have equal or better ones for you. One way is to run a single electric wire 4 to 6 inches off ground on the interior perimeter of your woveen wire fence.
    Another method is to partially bury 2x8 planks on edge , attach ends of these to posts, attach woven wire to horizontal along ground planks. Or you coulddig a shallow trench where fence will be, set woven wire down into it, then use bags of Quikcrete to mix cement and pour a small berm around perimeter, such that the lower part of wire is poured into concrete berm.
    The difficulty of these methods depends mostly on size of pen. Best Luck with it.
     

  3. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    I suspect that electric is the most cost efficient way to go anyway. By the time you buy posts, mesh, boards and staples; rent an auger or pounder and then take the time to build your fence you could have an electric put up. A used energizer at a farm sale or from the local Bargain Finder paper would be $20 or so. Some plastic step-in posts and some smooth wire and you have a fence of any size or location for years to come. Just something to think about.

    If you still want to go with wood posts and mesh, UpNorth mentioned boards nailed across the bottom. This system has worked very well for me also. I staple the mesh to the posts and then nail 2x6 boards on top of the mesh and posts all along the ground. That way when they root along the fence, they can't get the nose under the mesh to push and stretch it up and scoot under to freedom!

    Good luck!
     
  4. Wildoutdoorsmen

    Wildoutdoorsmen Active Member

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  5. blindhen

    blindhen Member

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    thanks everyone for your help....we just found a solar electric set up at a garage sale in great condition at a great price so...we're all set!!!
     
  6. t-bird

    t-bird Member

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    I always but a strand of barb wire at the bottom of the fencing. A poke in the snout from a barb and they learn quickly.
    T-bird
     
  7. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Just my humble opinion Blindhen, but I wouldn't trust my flowers and garden to a solar fencer in Wisconsin. I would find one that plugs in to a 110 outlet.
     
  8. Digby49

    Digby49 Member

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    I have tried a new solar fencer in full sun and its not worth a dam, I now have a new battery powered 5 mile and it last a month and has plenty of power (not want you want to hear ) they are not to much to buy new $65 and it works .Digby
     
  9. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    A solar panel to keep a fencer battery charged is more than adequate. I am unaware of any that work without a battery. Am I wrong?

    If a battery powered fencer is not working it is the fencer, not the solar panel that is at fault.

    I have used solar panels to maintain charge on fish feeders for years. They work fine. I also have battery powered fencers, which also work fine but they cannot ever match the charge put out by a fencer plugged into a wall socket.
    Ox
     
  10. myheaven

    myheaven Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They have trickel chargers at tsc for $18.00 and they work great for extra juice.
     
  11. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Ox- I can believe solar works fine for you in OK. Here we get 4-5 day stretches of dreary grey overcast on a regular basis. I won't say solar can't work, but I wouldn't trust my flowers and garden to them. A 100 mile fencer plugged in 24-7 that knocks an animal on it's butt on first contact will protect your VEG, lol.

    Anybody see Wallace&Gromit - Curse of the Were-Rabbit ?
    ....."PROTECT THE VEG, GROMIT LAD"....... LOL Rabbits or pigs, it's all about protecting the VEG!
     
  12. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    John, are you saying ALL you need is those step-in posts, the kind that are about 4' tall with a sort of tent stake at the bottom ~6" long? Can it really be that easy?! For let's say a 40x40' enclosure, how many posts? How many lines of wire, and what exactly is smooth wire? I know what intellitape is and that there are several differnet types of tape and wire and rope; I want to be sure to get the right thing. Do I need insulators or will the little hooks on the posts be enough? I have a Kube Argus 250. Voltage at no load 7000 V, light load 4000, heavy load 1000, max puls voltage 9000; fence line length max 6 km. Puls energy "max. 0,2 J" I am not sure whether that's 2 or .2 Joules; hopefully you can decipher! :shrug:

    I bet I have read this post 10 times and it finally just hit me what exactly you were saying. I think it sounded too simple so my brain didn't register it! I have got to get those pigs out of the poultry netting and into something they can't short out ASAP!
     
  13. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    Yesterday I put poultry net in a new spot for the pigs. There was a real good charge on it, I could even feel it through my pigskin work gloves. And it's been raining, the ground is wet. 5pm still a good zap. 6am NO zap! I went around and removed all the rooted up stuff and got only a mild tingle when I was done. WHAT is going on here?! :help:
     
  14. bill not in oh

    bill not in oh Well-Known Member

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    Don't know why you're losing your charge that quickly unless you missed somewhere there is ground/vegetation contact with the netting (pretty easy to do), but with leather gloves and rubber soled boots without wet ground my fence will make me wish I'd been more careful about contact - just short of knocking me on my butt. I'm not familiar with poultry netting, so I guess there could be something with it.

    And no, you don't need insulators with step-in posts. I usually use at the very least t-posts with insulators on the corners of the pen so I can tension the wire somewhat and use step-ins between them to keep the wire from sagging. Smooth wire is high-tensile - either galvanized or aluminum.
     
  15. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    I like low tech, so use cattle panels. Pigs are very stubborn animals and have very tough skin and are very strong. I've not seen barbed wire work to contain them. I've heard too many people complain about electric for me to have even tried it. I get teh sense that as long as there is never a short it's ok, but that shorts are common. That said, I have seen them mangle a cattle panel when the clip was too far from the ground and they were able to bite the edge of the panel. If burrowing under is a problem, you can use a bolt cutter to cut off the bottom rung and then implant the tines into the ground by simply stepping on it so there are quarter inch thick spikes that they would have to dig past, much more impressive than a barb on wire.
     
  16. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    Pictures of pigs waiting for their food while respecting electric fencing. The top two pics the pigs are around 250 lbs, in the bottom one they are about 125.

    Pete

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  17. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    Sorry for not responding here Firefly...Our pm's have hopefully made it easier for you. Good luck.