Pig fat uses?

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by quailkeeper, Oct 21, 2005.

  1. quailkeeper

    quailkeeper Well-Known Member

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    A friend of mine butchered a 500 lb 14 month old sow. She had about 75 lbs of extra fat. Before she had her butchered I told her I wanted the fat to mix with ground lamb. She brought me three big boxes full :eek: I won't need this much so what can it be used for besides lard and dog treats? Oh and I don't like chittlins (sp?). Can it be used for soaps or something like that?
     
  2. pjd

    pjd Well-Known Member

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    old fashioned lye soap is made from hog lard, I render it out and then make soap with it. It is excellent for drying up poison ivy, better than calomine lotion. I also grate it and use it to wash my towels and sheets, makes them so soft and clean. I use it with loads that are washed in hot water. I have read people dissolving it in water first to make a liquid soap for non hot water loads but I usually run out using it in the hot water loads.
     

  3. Horace Baker

    Horace Baker Well-Known Member

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    If it's fat back as opposed to leaf lard, it can be used for salt pork. I have also had slabs of fat back smoked like bacon, to be fried and eaten like bacon. Any that I know I won't use I have my butcher grind and put in 1# packages to feed to the chickens, they just hoover it.
     
  4. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Chitterlings (chitlins) are made from the hog intestine. Cracklings are made from fat!
     
  5. quailkeeper

    quailkeeper Well-Known Member

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    Here the fried pig fat is called cracklins or chittlins. They are the same thing. I have never heard of using the intestines for anything other than sausage casing. Thanks for some of the ideas!! I'll have to find me a source for lye and experiment making soap. I have a book that tells how to turn sheep fat into soap. I guess its basically the same thing?
     
  6. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

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    We had fat from 7 pigs to render and it took up lots of freezer space until I could get to it. I rendered it down and canned it in wide mouth quart jars. Took up less space and 1 quart jar is a more managable size to deal with. First time I renedered I did it on the stove top and woulnd up scorching it. Next time was in the oven and it was much better.

    Lard makes the best piecrusts!

    Soap is good too to use up lard. I've done a 100% lard soap but it too forever to come to trace, so now I 've reduced it down to about 60% and added other oils.
     
  7. pjd

    pjd Well-Known Member

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    not only pie crusts but new potatoes freshly dug fried in corn fed hog lard, almost qualifies as a dessert around here! We look forward to those first fried taters........
     
  8. americanbulldog

    americanbulldog American Hunter

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    What is a good way for me to get clean human grade lard for eating that is cheap? I want to get a bunch but it all is hydronated(sp?) and kind of pricey around here as far as I can tell.
     
  9. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    Go to your local butcher, who slaughters animals for other people, and ask to buy some pig fat. I did that and he gave me around 25 lbs for free. Then I rendered it, and presto, loads of lard. Of course, I don't know what the pigs were fed, but they were home-raised, so there's at least a good chance that it's not nearly as nasty as commercially raised lard.

    Besides, I use it for soap. For eating, I now raise my own. :D
     
  10. americanbulldog

    americanbulldog American Hunter

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    Thanks Laura I will give that a try.