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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Questions sometimes pop up when I post pictures so I have started this thread. I thought about titling it Sweden but then again people up here are very independant so I will stick with Jämtland. This area has been torn so many times in wars between Norway and Sweden so the inhabitants have a very strong regional identity.
But it was the fences I was going to show you. These are the traditional way of fencing in Jämtland. Gärdsgård , as they are called, are built from very slow growing Fir trees.. These trees grow in hostile conditions and ,though up to a hundred years old, only reach the thickness of an arm. This means that the trunks chosen are very strong and hardwearing.


The first video is interesting because there are also good shots of the area. A shame that the song is in French!!! But the gårdsgärd is not well made.
[ame="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdP5kWpTwww"]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdP5kWpTwww[/ame]
The branches that are used as rope are steamed to make them more flexible
[ame="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n6WZV43MN0s"]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n6WZV43MN0s[/ame]
 

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i love it when you post pictures !!!
 

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Very interesting! Always good to see how things are done differently in other areas.

This country was largely unfenced until barbed wire. There are remnants of dry stacked rock fences. for what purpose I am unsure? THey didn't continue on, and had no natural boundaries. Often geographical features formed fencelines, such as impassible canyon rims, with brush stacked in areas where livestock could pass.

Cedar pickets and stacked rock often formed corrals. As a kid, there was a set of pens along the head of the Apishapa river canyon that Charles Goodnight had built, using cedar pickets and rawhide to tie them. There were still traces of rawhide after 100 years in this climate. Of course the rock walls last far longer.

Posts here are much better if they are cut in drier areas, that what rain we get runs off faster, causing slow growth and denser wood.

Using wood for pens or gates seems to be a thing of the past here, replaced by steel. I do remember a lot of fir wood gates...it was a tough springy wood, and full of splinters when it aged. I am supposing the posts in your pics are also fir? What kind of lifespan do they have in your climate?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have brought up an old topic as I want to reply to Cindilu about Tom's video without spoiling the thread.
Jämtland, the province we live in is about the same size as Massachusetts but with a population of 113000 as compared to Massachusetts nearly 7 million!
The market Tom filmed is in our main city with a population of 44000.
From medieval times until the 1950's when cars started to gain popularity, the markets were the only way these isolated communities were able to barter , or buy, commodities.
The markets were mostly once a year in the winter months. Roads were bad on non existent so travelling farmers earned a living visiting the various markets in Northern Scandinavia to sell and barter. Dairy produce was taken North from this area to exchange for dried meat and skins. These could be bartered for fish and salt in Norway. Mora is still known for its' knives. Dalarne was the place to get a hoard of spinning wheels and flax.
Östersund is one of these market towns. Now we have supermarkets- and can buy anything we need from day to day. Why, we can even go online and get goods without moving from the sofa.
We still have the markets more as entertainment but also as places where we know we can get good artisan culinary delights and traditional craftmanship.
We are very few people in the area and very little happens here so if there is a market, a fayre, or some entertainment ,EVERYONE turns out from miles around.
Here are some photos from the market in Norway, about 100 miles from our hamlet. !4 horses and sledges take the trip to the market as they did in the old days. We took the bus!



At the market there were about 200 horses. Here they are waiting on a frozen lake for the opening ceremony


And in Röros

 
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