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Never done it before, but my dad is asking for recipes/techniques. He doesn't can, so need refrigerator/freezer methods. He's over run and doesn't want to lose them to frost.
Any tried and true methods?
Thanks in advance.

Matt
 

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I found a link for refrigerator pickles that says they will stay good for months. I will include it. I have never made these, as I would just can them...

Also, he could slice the tomato's how ever thick he likes them for fried green, first freeze them on a cookie sheet..when frozen bag them up for the freezer (that way they won't stick together)


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/craig-goldwyn/pickled-green-tomatoes-recipe_b_754850.html

Good luck to him. :)
 
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Thanks all...my dad doesn't can, but hates to waste them. Thanks for these and future responses.
He also doesn't want to ripen them...he's over loaded.

Matt
 

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If he wraps each tomato in newspaper, puts them in a box, in a dark place where they can get air circulation, he can have ripe tomatoes through the winter. I used to put the box under my bed and would take a couple tomatoes out every few days to ripen...snow on the ground and tomatoes on the windowsill turning red.

Mon
 

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You can make relish out of them, green ketchup, green tomato sauce, and the pickles you mentioned. All are available on the internet. A few years ago we got a tomato blight and when they started to turn red they rotted, so we had to use them green. At the time I found all these recipes by searching the internet. The ketchup tasted like the relish, and the sauce had a lot of Parmesan cheese in it. The pickles if I remember had a lot of brown sugar in them.
 

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If he wraps each tomato in newspaper, puts them in a box, in a dark place where they can get air circulation, he can have ripe tomatoes through the winter. I used to put the box under my bed and would take a couple tomatoes out every few days to ripen...snow on the ground and tomatoes on the windowsill turning red.

Mon
When I have a full mater crop in the kitchen garden and strip the greenies before the first frost , I wrap and box em and sort through the boxes once a week and have ripe tomatoes often through January at a rate of three to seven per week.
 

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If he wraps each tomato in newspaper, puts them in a box, in a dark place where they can get air circulation, he can have ripe tomatoes through the winter. I used to put the box under my bed and would take a couple tomatoes out every few days to ripen...snow on the ground and tomatoes on the windowsill turning red.

Mon
Newspaper works good.
 

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Allowing the tomatoes to ripen gradually as above will work, and give him ripe tomatoes for many months into winter. Keep an eye on them, and pull them out for special attention when they begin to colour. If he needs them to hurry up, he can store a few at a time with apples.

Also, prepping and freezing them works. Scalding, peeling, chopping, cooking, then freezing them (or leaving the cooking until after it's thawed), as a mixed ratatouille with other chopped vegetables and fruit (e.g. squash, zucchini, pumpkin, potato, apple, beans, peas, eggplant, peppers) is tasty, and the ingredients only have to stay somewhat separate - not totally so.

You can even make sweet or savoury pie filling with apples and chopped green tomatoes, and sweetener, herbs and spices as appropriate. Or pizza topping. Or soup - even green tomato gazpacho.

Green tomato jam.

Pickled green tomatoes.
Green tomato pickles (different), green tomato piccalilli or chow-chow, green tomato relish, and green tomato chutney.
There's a lot of overlap, but each one will get you some unique recipes.

You can, of course, make hot or savoury tomato sauce with vinegar and/or sugar - red with red tomatoes and peppers, green with green tomatoes and peppers, or yellow with mustard (and maybe turmeric), tomatoes and peppers. Heck, if you wanted to go crazy you could make it blue with blueberries and grape or blackcurrant juice, and maybe "red" cabbage for a pickle. It looks distinctly odd or off, but it tastes fine, and kids often love it.
 

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I don't mess around with wrapping green tomatoes. I spread them out on cookie sheets with a pad of newspaper, try to keep them from touching, keep out of direct sun. Most will ripen up. Sliced or whole green tomatoes can be rinsed and frozen w-o any other processing. I enjoy fried green tomatoes. I just take the slices, still frozen, flour or batter them, and lay down in a little oil or butter. If you're making any crock or stovetop stew that is hearty, some green tomatoes can go right in. They really just disappear, but add a little tang and substance.
 
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