pet sheep question

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by Manchamom, Dec 15, 2004.

  1. Manchamom

    Manchamom trail ahead-goats behind

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    oregon
    Hi everyone, I have posted on the goat forum but usually just look and soak up info. I have a question about a ram I was given. Some background, I started goat packing a few years ago and have enjoyed it immensely with my family. Then came my daughters FFA project she raised a speckled faced wether for market. When the time came to sell it she couldn't do it. No problem we're not hurting for feed or meat. She spent the summer 2 years ago training it and guess what? It works harder and longer than the goats, tries harder, and doesn't follow everybody that walks by. This wasn't even a bottle raised lamb, just trained for FFA. This wether is now wading in the ocean and climbing stairs better than the best.
    O.k. today I was given a 2 year old suffolk ram. He is what I think is the no no of rams, bottled raised, no fear of man at all. He sneaks up and "rams" you out of nowhere.He hit the elderly man who owned him too hard and fast and broke his knee. This man isn't real bright when it comes to critters but still.
    My question is, if I were to get this big boy wethered would he stop the sneak attacks. Is this behavior hormonal or learned?
    This boy is gentle to handle, halter trained (mostly), and easy to deal with in the barn. He would never see a ewe again and would have plenty of work to do.
    What do you think?
    Thanks, Jill
     
  2. YuccaFlatsRanch

    YuccaFlatsRanch Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Don't count on it!! Head butting is how Rams play and he has had plenty of time to learn how to play.
     

  3. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Sorry Jill, I have to agree with Yucca. At 2 years of age the hormones have kicked in and wethering him will in all probability just give you a very fat wether, an expensive vet bill and you will still have a bolshie sheep on your hands. Hand reared rams (like bulls) can be dangerous sods as they have no fear and they are the male of the species. You have two options - put him in a paddock that you don't have to go through and ignore him if you feel you may get some good lambs out of him, or knock him off for dog tucker or sausages. And please, keep children well away from him.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  4. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    He'll be a handful and unpredictable no matter what you do, I'd find him a home on a farm that needs a breeder if he's decent enough.
     
  5. Manchamom

    Manchamom trail ahead-goats behind

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    Location:
    oregon
    Thanks all, for dog food he was intended so I guess he'll just keep his appointment on wed. We certainly don't need anything we can't take hiking or to the beach. People love to see the goats and sheep working and we don't want any accidents. I do have a wethered son of his to work with so I'll just wait for him to grow. The wethers do play butt with each other and the goats, but not people and they never come full bore out of nowhere to hit you. He's in a box stall out of the way for now. We don't even need to go in to feed and water and my youngest child is 15 so we'll be fine till he goes.
    Thanks again, Jill
     
  6. diamondefarm

    diamondefarm Well-Known Member

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    OK
    Life is too sgort to put up with BS from a ram. If you are really attached to him, you could have him cut and see if it helps once the testoserone is onut of his system.

    If not, ship him.