pet medication shock

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by MaKettle, Mar 17, 2005.

  1. MaKettle

    MaKettle Well-Known Member

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    Stopped by the vet for a packet of something to put on the dog to prevent fleas, ticks. A one month supply came to $19++. Also need some for the two cats. And the heartworm meds. Hmmm. $$$

    Checked Foster & Grant, and the Advantix + S & H will come to about $19. But they also carry Bio-Spot, and a 3 month supply costs $5.49, and is advertised to be even better than Advantix. Is it? Anyone have some information or experience with it?

    F & G carries Heartguard, 6 for $25.56. And Tri-heart Plus for $17.94 Heartguard is good--Miz Picky Eater likes it. Will probably go with Heartguard, since she had been treated For heartworms before I got her, and I don't want to take any chances. But, has anyone had experience with Tri-heart?
     
  2. dot

    dot Well-Known Member

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    I just did a quick search on biospot and the first thing that came up said it poses serious health risks to dogs.
     

  3. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    The Tri-heart is basically Heartgard, but with a pork (instead of beef) base. Since the patent expired recently on Heartgard there's beginning to be a few ivermectin-based products coming on the market recently. You will need to get a prescription from your veterinarian to purchase either the Tri-heart or the Heartgard. Ask your vet, but most don't give prescriptions to on-line pharmacies because for the on-line pharmacy to get the product they have to purchase it from "suppliers" (vets who buy more than they need and resell it to the pharmacies). This practice is not authorized and is strongly discouraged by the manufacturers. Also there is no guarantee how the product has been handled/stored when it's been through at least three sets of "hands." Also the product will have no guarantee of efficacy (at least not from the manufacturer) if for some reason your dog would get heartworm. If purchased from your vet and given properly, if your dog were to get heartworm or intestinal parasites (not likely, but no med is 100% effective in 100% of patients), the company would pay for treatment, etc.

    As far as the frontline/advantage, it is NOT illegal for you to purchase these products without a prescription. The same holds true for what I said about heartworm meds (except of course the prescription part). In the past year or two there have been several reports of counterfeit Frontline being distributed by on-line pharmacies (see www.frontline.com/epa for details). As far as the Bio-spot, I can't comment on whether it works better than Advantix or not. I don't use/sell either product. I have heard reports that people are not as happy with the Advantix as one would hope. From my experience, Frontline works the best, but I'm sure other things have worked better for other people. I do know that if fleas aren't a big concern for you that Amitraz collars work about as well as anything for ticks (and are not very expensive). If you do try the Bio-spot (or Advantix for that matter), DO NOT use the dog product on cats. You will kill the cat! I am not sure, but I really doubt that the "cat Bio-spot" works very well (but like I say I have not used the product myself).

    After weighing all the options and talking with your vet (some vets will meet the on-line pharmacy prices and you still get the guarantees, etc. :) ) I know you will be able to make a informed decision.

    Edited to add: If you buy more than a one-month supply of the Frontline, it's not nearly so expensive (still expensive, though!). Also the ingredient in Bio-spot that kills cats and causes issues in some dogs is the pyrethrins (the don't seriously harm ALL dogs, but many are sensitive-personally I don't want to take that chance on MY dogs :) ).
     
  4. MaKettle

    MaKettle Well-Known Member

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    Thank you, Sarah. Like you, I don't want to experiment on my dog. Or cats. From what you have said, I plan to stick to the $$$ meds.
     
  5. caberjim

    caberjim Stableboy III

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    We just got a 6 month supply of Frontline and heartworm preventative from www.petshed.com. About half the price of the online US pet med people. There was a thread about this a few weeks back you might want to read and make your own decision. But I'm happy with what we got.

     
  6. sylvar

    sylvar Well-Known Member

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    When I saw the title of this thread thr first thing that came to mind was Bio-spot. I had real problems with that stuff. I used it on my basset and she started getting the shakes real bad. I was frantic, I searched the internet for her symptoms and wasn't turning up much. Then on a lark I searched on bio-spot. I found that same site. I threw the dog in the tub and scrubbed her down and she was back to normal in a couple hours.

    Sylvar
     
  7. second_noah

    second_noah Local Yokel

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    Just to throw a few cents in:

    We sold AdvantIX and AdvantAGE at my clinic and had several SMALL breed dogs who had BAD reactions to the AdvantIX. Personally, for the money, I'd go for FrontlinePlus or just regular Advantage.

    We used BioSpot for a time in our kennel as a cheaper alternative to in house flea treatments on boarding pets. It was not as effective as some of the chemically based products(Advantage, Frontline, Adams). It suppressed the flea population for only a limited time and we stopped using it.

    I feel the same way about Capstar. It's a total waste of money. Why would you treat your pet one time for fleas with a treatment that has a VERY short period of efficacy?

    I've never seen an animal react negatively to Frontline, except for one dog who seemed to have problems that stemmed from Lymes disease, and even then the symptoms were minimal and quickly gone. (IF in fact the top spot was a factor.)

    I really don't think you're going to find anything in a cheaper range, below Advantage and Frontline, that's going to do a really good job at flea control. Most of the other products are permethrin and pyrethrin based and aside from the possibility of bad reactions and toxic problems if for some reason used on cats, they just don't last very long. The 'higher end' products are able to control flea reproduction as well as just plain killin' the adults, which really is a great thing when you're trying to clear the fleas out of your home.
     
  8. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    if you have a negative heart worm test from the vet, you can use ivermectin injectable, as a pour on, and it controls heartworm, plus all the other types of worm, except tapes, i think. much, much cheaper, too. i use it on vrything except the chickens and cats. i've never have a vet have a problem with my doing this. do not try this on a dog that has not been tested, unless you are prepared to lose the dog. same as what the vet sells, and that requires a test first too.
     
  9. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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  10. tobo6

    tobo6 Well-Known Member

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    Careful using Ivermectin on certain breeds of dogs. Off hand I want to say collie breeds, but do a google search and find out for sure. It can kill that type of dog.

    With that said, I use Ivermectin for worming with my dogs, and am very happy with it. There is a lot of room to play with the medication, and even if you give too much, it won't kill your dog. Makes them act drunk, but wears off fast. Yep, as you can guess, I miss read the amount and gave our dog too much one time. The vet laughed and said, no harm, try and give your dog some coffee and it will help her. Couldn't get the dog to drink it, but she did sleep a lot that night.

    Tried biospot because it was cheap for fleas, and I seen a little help the first month, after that it didn't help at all. Didn't make the dog at funny, but didn't help the fleas.

    I buy Advantage at our feed store. Four months supply cost $39.00, so $10 a month. Same stuff our vet was selling to us, but a lot less expensive.

    Deb
     
  11. Cindy in KY

    Cindy in KY Well-Known Member

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    I buy 6 packs of FRONTLINE PLUS EXTRA LARGE 89-132lb for dogs. Each vial has 4 cc's of liquid. So there are 24 cc's of liquid in a 6 pack. My Border Collies are about 40 lbs, and they get 1 cc, between the shoulder blades. If the dog is 50 lbs, they get 1 & 1/2 cc. For 8 wk old pups, about 10 lbs, they get 1/4 cc. So even one vial would dose 16, 8wk old pups. Frontline Plus works great, I dose every 2 months, only because we have fields, pastures, etc. Normaly you'd only have to dose every 3 months with it. It does last at least 60 days, maybe 90 days depending on your area and where the dogs go. You do not need to use this every month, wait and see how long it works in your area.

    So with a Extra Large 6 pack, I can dose 24 dogs for 2 months worth. Even at retail price, that is only less than $3.00 a dog for 2 months. (40 lb dog) You can't get it on your hands, and you have to know how to use a needle & syringe, and only put one dose in the syringe at a time so as not to slip. I stick the needle thru the back foil of the vial, and pull out the dose. I leave the vials standing up once they have been poked. I take off the needle, and with the syringe, apply it to the dog. Those disposable gloves are really good for this.

    This way too, you are not putting more on the dog than it actually needs, you are dosing for actual weight. If you live in a really bad flea area, you might have to use a tad more, but the dose above works great for my dogs. Do not bathe your dog for several days before or several days after, it takes the oils in the skin to work. Do not use soap on your dog if you can help it, and if you have to, use only a tiny amount of Baby Shampoo. Leave the dogs natural oils on him.


    I use the ivomec/proplyene glycol solution to dose my dogs once a month for HW prevention. 14 cc ivomec 1% + 86 cc proplyene glycol = 100 cc. I dose this at 1 cc per 100 lbs, squirted in the mouth. It is a very small amount of ivomec, but it only takes a very small amount for HW prevention. This does not do other worms. You can put the above formula into google, and read all over the web about it. Dose at your own risk, do not get it on your hands. Wear gloves, and only put one dose in the syringe at a time, so as not to slip and give too much.
     
  12. Cindy in KY

    Cindy in KY Well-Known Member

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    CaberJim, that is the price I pay, $44 for the 6 packs of FRONTLINE PLUS EXTRA LARGE 89-132lb for dogs. Retail is $75. Thanks, that is a good link, although I buy it at another place, nomally $46, but if you buy a case it comes down to $44 each. We all go in together if we get a case sometimes. At $44, it is down to less than $2.00 a dog for 2 months worth (40 lb dog).

    Here's Jim's link again. http://www.petshed.com/frontline-plus.asp
     
  13. Irish Pixie

    Irish Pixie Limp Bisket LOL

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    Like Agmantoo I've found that, overall, ValleyVet has the cheapest prices and they are wonderful to work with. I ordered a bottle of flyspray last year and it leaked all over the box. I emailed them and they replaced it immediately. I order all my vaccines for the horses from them.

    Stacy