Persimon wood

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by vicker, Oct 21, 2006.

  1. vicker

    vicker Well-Known Member

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    I scored some persimmon boards at work the other day (sawmill). I am building our cabinets our of sassafrass and cherry, and I am thinking the persimon will make a great counter top (the new lumber will have to dry for a year or more of course). The boards are straight sawn 4/4, and I was wondering what would be the best way to make a counter top with them. Should I use the planks and glue them together, or should I cut them into 1" strips and glue them together with varying grain? Any suggestions?
     
  2. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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  3. vicker

    vicker Well-Known Member

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    It is very heavy and dense. I had 100 bft or so of green sassafrass and a few hundred of mixed walnut and cherry that is pretty dry. I stacked and sticked it all today and put the simon on the bottom, followed by the sass, and then the walnut and cherrry. I think it will dry fine. I figure the simon will take quite some time to air dry and slow is good.
    Any suggestions on joining the boards for the counter top?
    thanks
     
  4. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    Since you are looking at using this in a kitchen, how about using biscuits to join it? As in biscuit joinery with edge to edge gluing. In addition to a quality glue if you feel the need also add pocket screws on the underside.

    Personally I'd go with planks rather than edge strips since the wood is so hard to come by. While my co-worker like Tite-bond glue, I prefer Gorilla Glue.
     
  5. PyroDon

    PyroDon Well-Known Member

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    Its better for funrature than fire wood , That stuff stinks to high heaven in a fireplace
     
  6. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    For a countertop, I would avoid any end grain to side grain joints if at all possible--such as at a corner in the countertop. No matter what, over the years the joint will open up. We used 5/4 cherry for our kitchen countertop with a front edge of wider material. There is no wood backsplash, just flat countertop, with tile on the wall from the countertop to the cabinets. So far so good, after 3 or 4 years, except one place where there is a corner and some end joints that open up in winter. If we were doing it over, I would run the boards the lenght of the longest section of counter, and then parallel to that in shorter parts of the counter, even if the boards ran the short way of the counter top, unless there was a natural break in the counter, such as a stove or appliance.
     
  7. vicker

    vicker Well-Known Member

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    Thanks to all. I have a small chunk drying under my woodstove. This persimon is (hands down) the densest wood I've ever handled. I am sure it will take quite some time to air dry sufficiently. Maybe the end of next summer I can start tying it. We have a butcher block table that I like very much. I suppose I will join some strips just to see what it would look like. At any rate, the wood should make a nice counter top.
    Anyone have any experience specifically with simmon wood? I read that it has "Large movement in use". What does that mean??? Expanding and contracting? :shrug: