Peppers Pitiful and Poorly; Pony Perplexed!

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Pony, Aug 27, 2006.

  1. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    How are your peppers doing?

    My hots (Hungarian Wax and Serrano) are doing all right; nothing spectacular, but all right.

    My sweet peppers, OTOH, are just plain crummy. I have them in two separate beds, and one in a planter, and they are barely producing. :(

    Is it just One of Those Years for sweet pepper production? I did the pretty much same things I always do with peppers, with the exception of placing a layer (3 sheets deep) of newspaper down in one bed and planting into that. But all the sweets are performing poorly.

    Pony!
     
  2. Cindy in NY

    Cindy in NY Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We have not had much success with peppers since we moved up here. This year was especially bad. Part of our problem might be the toxin given off by our butternut trees. We thought we were planting far enough away from them but who knows. Next year we are going to grow them in containers and see if that helps.
     

  3. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    Here on the left coast, I'm getting a pleasant harvest from my yellow and purple bell plants, and a lot of green ones that are supposed to turn red and haven't. The Santa Fe grande is producing nicely, but the Anaheim hasn't put out a single pepper. There used to be a taller plant to the west of the Anaheim, so maybe it got less sun, I dunno.

    Having a problem with sunscald on the bells, though.

    Our weather here, after two atypical heat spells in July that would have been normal in August, has been unusually mild. I am now enjoying fine 'October' evenings in the mid-60's. (yeah, check the date stamp on that...)
     
  4. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Jalapenos have done great, Banana peppers have been on the small side as have the bell peppers.

    We're having mid-60s weather at night here in MS now too. Hubby says that's because Fall is just around the corner (he goes by a three month seasonal division, not by the equinoxes).
     
  5. Zebraman

    Zebraman Well-Known Member

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    Hey Guys;I too am on the left coast and this year has been really mild.Here in Venice we only got a couple of days of that heat wave,but we have air conditioning.I have Relleno' Peppers that are blooming and starting to produce,My Pablano are Huge my Italian Cow Horn are still undersized and green.A lot of my tomatoes are really taking their time ripening.My Red Calabash are loaded with Green tomatoes.My Landreth are just starting to change color,Missouri Giants are not Giant and are still green,My summer Squash Confederate Gold is a clear Winner!They are still producing.-But then again its only August,there are still 2-3 months in the summer growing season.-
     
  6. bugstabber

    bugstabber Chief cook & weed puller Supporter

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    They're doing okay, but the jalapenos didn't set much fruit. I'm guessing it was too hot when they were blooming. I had one cherry pepper covered with fruit, and another with just a couple - they were planted quite far apart and possible on different days but who knows. The bells are doing okay too.
     
  7. whiterock

    whiterock Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I can grow hot peppers easily but sweet peppers just won't do in my soil.
    Ed
     
  8. pickapeppa

    pickapeppa Well-Known Member

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    Pony, having the same experience here. The green peppers(supposed to be red, but never make it that far) got some real big ones (that the slugs got to first of course), and the rest are smallish, and not very prolific. The hungarians are unbelievably low in productivity as in years past. I'm starting to wonder if our seed supply has been damaged with gmo's.

    BTW, have you seen those mongo cantelope on steroids they're selling this year at walwart? Those things just don't look right.

    Peppa's perplexed, too on the pepper production point.

    Lolol, say that five times fast!

    BTW, do you still make soap? If the answer is yes, I have something you might be interested in. But it's kind of heavy. A big tub of coconut oil. Let me know.
     
  9. free-2-b-me

    free-2-b-me Well-Known Member

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    I planted 36 sweet red pepper plants . They were doing well and setting blossoms when we got that hail storm in june . That took most of the leaves and blossoms off . They recovered well and started setting blossoms again - then they got blossom drop . I read on another group to apply epsom salts . I did that with no results other than the plants got nice and lush . They started to set blossoms again so I did what my late sister had told me years ago - take a book of matched - place a match tip down next to the base of each plant - one on each side . Something about the sulfur....
    Well they set blossoms and are now setting fruit . Problem now is that it is getting late in the season . They are in a boxed raised bed so we are going to put hoops and plastic up to extend the season . Hopefully we will harvest some red peppers this year .
     
  10. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

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    This has been my best year ever for peppers. My Cubanelles and Giant Aconcagua have been really productive and really tasty. Has anyone tried this Aconcagua pepper? It's very sweet even when it's green. My Giant Marconi has only produced a few... but each one is about a foot long! I've got more Anaheims than I know what to do with and I'm drying big bunches of Guajillo peppers.
     
  11. turtlehead

    turtlehead Well-Known Member

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    I have never grown peppers in WV, only in south central GA (where they did gang busters). This year in WV I planted three bell peppers, two jalapenos, and one each of a variety of other hot peppers, just to see what happened with each of them.

    My peppers are planted with my tomatoes.

    Hot peppers:
    The serrano at the end of the row is doing GREAT.
    My jalapenos are doing okay.
    The others are growing but very little fruit.

    Sweet (bell) peppers:
    I have gotten ONE bell pepper off one plant, one is growing on a second plant, and the third hasn't even flowered.

    I think part of my problem is they need more sun and air circulation. And I think it got super hot around the time they were supposed to set fruit so no fruit. I *think* they're starting to do better now but maybe I'm just hoping for peppers so badly that I exaggerate every possible flower bud and ignore the empty expanses of my pepper plants.

    So... are yours getting plenty of sun and air circulation?
    Maybe that's it and maybe it's just a bad year.
     
  12. Barb

    Barb Well-Known Member

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    Mine started out so poorly that they were losing leaves. But someone mentioned putting epson salts on them. So I added some fertilizer and some epsom salts and now they are doing great. I'll add the epsom salts again next year only earlier. I have loads of banana peppers and I will have enough green to get me through the winter. I have a bunch of chillies but so few tomatoes they aren't going to do me any good for salsa.

    Anyone have a simple recipe for canning banana & chilli peppers?
     
  13. kbshorts

    kbshorts Well-Known Member

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    Hey Barb! Bring some of those chillis to VA. and I will send you back with all the tomatos you can carry. My peppers have been struggling all season, some kind of fungal disease tried to defoliate them and I had to destroy several to get it stopped. The banana peppers just never recovered, jalapeno and habernaro are producing a little but I had to buy peppers to make salsa this weekend. I bet I won't take the peppers for granted next year!
    KB
     
  14. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Maybe those of us who are in the Midwest and East can swap with the folks who've had a good pepper season out on the West Coast!

    Pony!
     
  15. Zebraman

    Zebraman Well-Known Member

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    Hey Pony;this is why I sent you the pm.-
     
  16. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Pony, what you need for sweet peppers is water, phosphorus, and nitrogen in that order. I won't even mention the organic fertilizer that's making mine go crazy for production since a very tiny percentage here would have access to it. What I use is close to D.A.P.'s ratio of 18-46-0. But if you can find something like 10-20-10 or 8-10-8, that would be close enough as long as it's high on that middle number.

    Martin
     
  17. Barb

    Barb Well-Known Member

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    Martin - Does that mean forget the Epsom Salt and just sock on the manure? Or do I need to buy?
     
  18. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Epsom Salts is good if you have a calcium deficiency. Quite widely used as a foliar spray but it's often more of a placebo than really helping much.

    A lot of manure would NOT be good for peppers, too much nitrogen. That makes huge beautiful plants but few fruit. A supplement of bone meal would supply both the calcium AND phosphorus needs.

    Epsom salts or bone meal, you still have to buy them. You can make your own bone meal by smashing and pulverizing animal bones. Effect kicks in good the second year after the bone bits begin to break down.

    Martin
     
  19. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Do you think it's too late for this year?

    I paid the most attention to those pepper beds, too, darn it! A nice thick layer of compost in all, and then the newspaper in the one bed.

    Oh, well. That's the gardening game. You'd think I would have a better attitude: I grew up a Chicago Cubs fan! LOL!

    Pony!
     
  20. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    Pony, what you see now is what you get now. But whatever you do now will help next year. Preparation for the following year should always begin as soon as the present year's crop is gone. Since it takes longer for a lot of organic material to break down, the time to do it is when Nature does it, in fall and winter. Assign certain sections of your garden for specific crops and then prepare the soil according to their needs. If it's to be peppers, go with whatever NPK is specific to their needs. That is, something with some nitrogen, high in phosphorus, but not much potassium. If for tomatoes, basically the same but with the potassium. Believe it or not, simple shredded oak leaves would supply the NPK needs of both peppers and tomatoes!

    The mistake many make is when they decide to go with organic materials for fertilizer but with commercial fertilizer thinking. The great advantage with commercial fertilizer is the availability of the NPK. The plants don't care where their NPK needs come from. Apply now and it's ready for the plants to use now. That doesn't work with natural materials. They need time to break down. Doesn't do any good to till in a lot of material at planting time when it won't be ready for the plants to use until fall. So, plan ahead for peppers, potatoes, alliums, carrots, and other vegetables which prefer a specific environment.

    Martin