Payson , Az.....A good place to live???

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by fordy, Mar 17, 2004.

  1. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    .............Was wondering if anybody has lived in or around Payson, Az.?? Looks to be a nice area to move too and setup a homestead. Lots of suny days, very little snow and it cools off after the sun goes down. I'm sure housing\land are pricey but maybe not so bad if you lived out aways from the town......anyway i was looking for info if anybody would like to share , thanks, ...fordy.. :)
     
  2. I don't know if this will help much, but I found a link. Only thing I know about AZ, is that its supposed to be very scenic (in areas) for those than might enjoy that sort of thing. Planning a trip this fall, to the white mountians region. Also I heard years ago that Phoenix is soupposed to be a very clean city.

    http://www.ci.payson.az.us/

    HTH
     

  3. I used to live in the Prescott, AZ area and have been to Payson several times.

    If you plan to move there, do so with a bushel basket full of money. It was discovered years ago by retirees. Land prices are out of sight. And remember the big forest fires in that area the past few years?

    As for Phoenix being clean; compared to what other smog-filled, congested, crime-ridden city? Big water problems also looming.

    bw
     
  4. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I live about an hour away from Payson. Yes, it is expensive. Little land on a flat (rocky mountains) and in the middle of a pine forest. Also the population is booming from Phoenix and California.

    Look towards the White Mountains and the towns of Show Low and Springerville. There is some farming, very little, in those areas. The farming areas are to the south around Wilcox.
     
  5. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    .............Thanks for the responses . I , really , am not wanting to buy a large tract of land. Something like 3 to 5 acres to setup a travel trailer and build a storage building\workshop combo with maybe sleeping quarters and bath. My intention is to winter in Az. and then travel north and find employment in the tourist area's of the Rockies up thru Nov. and then move back south to my little Ranchito. Very simple and as efficient as I can make it.....thanks, ...fordy.. :eek: :)
     
  6. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    We live in Willcox. It is cold and windy in the winter but land is very cheap. Jobs are scarce unless you work for the government or own your own business. We moved here from the Phoenix area. Snowbirds invade AZ so stay away from the big cities. Could you stay in your trailer to see if you like it? Might be better than owning land as being absent part time is an invitation to crime. There is an illegal alien problem in parts of Cochise County so beware. We had considered Snowflake prior to our move but the land we looked at had no facilities. They do get snow there. We get some but it's gone by the end of the day.
     
  7. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) Well, my cousin lives in Show Low. Their first house burned down around their ears...they just got it rebuilt and the wildfires got 'em again! They are going to try once more. The drought is terrible there still(and in the whole area)and it shows no sign of abating. I'd give that some real serious thought before putting my family through all that.

    LQ
     
  8. pcdreams

    pcdreams Well-Known Member

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    How long you lived there? We left in 88..
     
  9. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Just to the East of Snowflake is an area called the Concho Hiway, about 20-25 miles long. Many back to the landers there. It is rolling hill country, some large gardens in the lower parts. Water is not a problem there, they live over one of the best and largest aquifers in the West. All the water you want at about 250 feet and solar works fine. It is windy in the spring, much like the upper midwest, but much, much warmer in winter. Land is $25 to 50K for 40 acres depending on how close you are to a paved road.
     
  10. Ok this is Almostthere...but for some reason I'm not staying logged in. I'm sure its my settings, I'll check them out in a bit. Anyhoo, I have a relative in ShowLow as well. She loves it but it took some getting used to(was a city girl too long). Hasn't been there long enough to expierence loosing her home to fire, tho. Biggest complaint is how far it is to town. But, her view makes up for that. Picture "Swiss Family Robinson" or "The Wilderness Family" Neighbors are friendly and helpfull, but has been warned (by law enforcement) to stay away from the reservation after dark. For water they do a water collection and I think they might have a well or get it hauled or something, I'm not sure but for thier small family it works well. Hasn't complained about the drought yet. Goes to town to do laundry, so that might make the difference. Very windy, they had to put up barriers. They are allowed to harvest (downed ?)trees from the local forrest now, I think its like $13 for the permit or you can get a truck load brought to you. HTH
     
  11. Fordy, my in-laws live just outside of Payson in a little town called Gisela, it's like this hidden jewel down in the valley by the Tonto Creek in the Tonto National Forest. What I discovered while searching for something on a few acres in that area, is that it is indeed very pricey. In fact, I couldn't find anything in my price range that was more than 1/2 acre. In Gisela, I couldn't find anything bigger than a couple of lots together. In fact, my in-laws neighbor has his old trailer and lot for sale for $34,000. Between Payson and Show Low, however, there seems to more land for sale, although not cheap by any means, but at least there were more "acreage" parcels available, usually between 1-10 acres. There are a couple of small communities on that road that had some reasonable prices, Pinedale and Clay Springs come to mind. They also had the big ponderosa pines, and get some snow in the winter. Closer to Snowflake and Taylor though, are where you can find parcels anywhere from 5 to 100 acres, pretty reasonable. The elevation is about 5500 feet, doesn't get too hot in the summer, snows in the winter, but usually melts the next day. There are two solar "stores" in Snowflake, cause lots of those places out on the Concho Highway don't have electricity. The wells are usually between 250 and 300 feet deep, and tap into the Coconino Aquifer, and is good water. Snowflake/Taylor is about 15 miles north of Show Low, lots of fishing close by, and if you are into hunting, lots of elk, turkey, bear, and deer around. Good luck on finding your place!!
     
  12. Cygnet

    Cygnet Guest

    My folks own a cabin off the control road, about 20 miles from Payson proper.

    It's expensive -- land runs about $30K for a bare acre. More if there are live ponderosa on it. Less if there are dead ponderosa on it.

    If you haven't been to the Rim Country in the last few years, you're in for a shock. A significant percent of the trees are dead from the drought and the beetles. We're talking thousands and thousands and thousands of square miles of dead trees. Ponderosa, juniper, pinyon, and oak are all being affected.

    Water can be an issue. My dad's well hit water at twenty feet, they went to seventy, he's got a virtually unlimited flow. Must have hit an underground river. Across the road, the neighbor dug a well to 300 feet, never hit water, and the well was only 100 feet from permanent perennial surface water. This is typical for the area. Many successful wells are very low flow; you're drilling into solid rock.

    Fire is a real and serious threat. Ever see a video of a Christmas tree burning in a house? One of those "Water your trees" videos they show during the holidays? Now picture a few thousand square miles of dead standing ponderosa, needles still on, grown as tight together as hairs on a dog, back that up with, say, with a usual 40mph wind, and a 90 degree day, and somebody lights a match ... yeah. Firestorm. The Chediskifire went from zero to 70,000 acres in a few hours, and the combined Rodeo/Chediski burn went to close to 500,000 acres in a few days.

    If you're looking to raise stock, too, predators could be a problem. The area's got everything from lion and bear to weasel and ringtail, and they're *all* hungry and not afraid of man.

    On the bright side, the weather's mostly nice -- butt deep snow happens about once every few years and it can hit 100 degrees for a few weeks in June -- and if you're close to the rim, you can expect pretty much daily thunderstorms July through August. Solar or, in the right area, wind power is possible to do. You can also heat your house pretty cheaply with wood if you've got the inclination to cut it yourself; most people in the area have woodburning stoves. Last year a permit for four cords of junipr and oak was $25. Ponderosa permits were free, but you don't want to burn with ponderosa except outside.

    There is tons of wildlife in the area, including large elk, lots of hiking, fishing (better some years than others), and just generally beautiful country. And the Rim is gorgeous if you can find property with a good view of it.

    Leva
     
  13. Cygnet

    Cygnet Guest

    Oh, one more thing -- Gila county is apparently pretty aggressive about enforcing code, especially including but not limited to, fire codes.

    Leva
     
  14. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ..............First, I want to tell you'll (texas lingo) how much I appreciate you're taking the time to respond to my post. What i have found in trying to extract basic information over the phone from Realestate agents is that They only want to accentuate the Positive as it were. Specifically, this can be a disaster when it comes to the hit or miss nature of finding water. Most folks on a fixed budget can't afford to drill more than one well . Also, the future saleability of your property is greatly affected by having an adequate supply of water. That is why "Your" responses are SO valuable to Me as you tell the truth as you have experienced IT. Personally , I can't get real excited about hauling water in any way shape or form. I can live without the grid and a phone but having a adequate supply of water is essential to make life habitable , atleast for me.
    ..............I need to sell my property Here before I purchase something out "There", where ever "there" turns out to be. At any rate I will continue to look for your informative Post(s) and I really do appreciate each individual response as all are valuable, thanks , fordy :)
     
  15. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    We have lived here almost 2 years and continue to improve our property. We were lucky to have a good well and be off the paved road. We travel to Tucson for shopping but people do haul water and it isn't that difficult. We are looking into the solar thing too. You have to visit the area and get a tour from a realtor to see the possibilities for yourself. The Snowflake area is nice but not too close to major highways. Makes getting in and out of big cities difficult. The area is truly beautiful though with trees. Good luck in your search of property.
     
  16. Actually Snowflake is on Hwy 77 which is 30 miles south of I-40 in Holbrook. It is also 15 miles north of Hwy 60, which goes east or west across Arizona, and hooks into major highways, like to Phoenix. Phoenix is about 2.5 hrs away from Snowflake, Flagstaff is 2 hours away, Albuquerque is 4 hours away. It is at least 20 degrees cooler in Snowflake than it is in Phoenix during the spring and summer.
     
  17. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ...............Was perusing the real estate web sites and of course the land prices are outrageous but I'm not surprised. It looks like to find anything reasonably priced with trees over 20 feet tall the property is going to have to be fairly remote and undeveloped. That translates into no grid, maybe hauling water, no phone . Truly remote , but I'm wondering how invasive the property restrictions will be?? Can i build any kind of structure I want or, are they going to meddle in my business??? Comments please, thanks, fordy... :eek: :)
     
  18. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    Cochise County has very relaxed restrictions and inspections on structures. There aren't any forests near us but everything grows so fast. You can always plant trees and have your own forest exactly where you want it.