Paw paw seedlings

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by TRAILRIDER, Jul 21, 2010.

  1. TRAILRIDER

    TRAILRIDER Well-Known Member Supporter

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    At the beginning of the year I sent a couple of HT'rs some paw paw seeds I got on Ebay. I planted a few outside in a raised bed but had no luck. I planted 6 more seeds in a pot on the porch (after refridgerating them for 60 days). I thought they were a bust! But now I have 5 little seedlings! It took so long for them to come up, I had to check photos online to make sure what they were. I am going to keep them on the porch (in the shade) until the weather gets too cool, then re-pot them individually and keep them indoors for the winter. I know they are sensitive to ultraviolet light when they are young. Wish me luck! BTW pourfolkes and forest breath, how did you do?
     
  2. TedH71

    TedH71 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would love to get some paw paw seeds plus some mayhaw tree seeds (was told they may not grow well here but I would like to try 'em in Kansas). Anyone have seeds? Contact me. Thank you.

    Congrats on your journey on growing them!
     

  3. garnetmoth

    garnetmoth Well-Known Member

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    congrats! I tried last year but failed (or thought I did and quit/ reused the pots)

    This year I just kep ignoring them and they came up! Ive been told they have a super long taproot so youd do best to put them in a tree nursery tube (im using a cut down big cardboard fabric bolt) and be real careful with the root.

    Had 2 up last month and 3 more show up this month!
     
  4. SueMc

    SueMc Well-Known Member

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    I have ten seedlings of thirteen germinated seeds that I got here:
    http://www.blossomnursery.com/
    I'm going to over winter them in pots and plant next year, and keep my fingers crossed.
     
  5. ronbre

    ronbre Brenda Groth Supporter

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    i planted seeds last year and they still aren't up but i have heard that they can take as long as a year and a half to sprout
     
  6. secretcreek

    secretcreek Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Pawpaws grow ALL OVER the place around here (SE OHIO). They like a sloped/welldrained understory. Next month is the Ohio Paw Paw festival ...it's a small venue but lots of fun! www.ohiopawpawfest.com The man who organizes the festival is respected as an authority in this region. He has created a whole business with PawPaws.

    -scrt crk
     
  7. Aohtee

    Aohtee Well-Known Member

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  8. TedH71

    TedH71 Well-Known Member Supporter

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  9. motdaugrnds

    motdaugrnds II Corinthians 5:7 Supporter

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    We have paw paws growing all around here. Our little grove has about a dozen trees in it; some quite old. Each year we see them bloom and fruit; then the fruit falls or something gets it. We never get any fruit off them. Can anyone tell me how to nurture these trees so we can reap a harvest from them?
     
  10. Aohtee

    Aohtee Well-Known Member

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    I see. It's a member of the Hawthorn family.

    My trees bear the same fruit/berry but at different times of the year from your southern trees. Yes, they have no taste when eaten raw, but made into jelly, they're superb. The leaves and dried berry of my trees are made into tea that is beneficial for heart problems. Mine also have 1 to 1 1/2 inch thorns that make it a good barrier plant.
     
  11. motdaugrnds

    motdaugrnds II Corinthians 5:7 Supporter

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    Our paw paw trees do not create "berries" but is a rather large egg-shaped fruit that is "sweet" when ripe. The tree has no thorns at all and grows tall, would not create a "barrier". Sounds like there may be more than one type of paw paw; but I am only familiar with this one.
     
  12. dragonchick

    dragonchick Well-Known Member

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    This sounds more like a Locust member tree than a PawPaw.
     
  13. Aohtee

    Aohtee Well-Known Member

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    No, mine is a Hawthorn. Crataegus intricata.

    From your reference:http://mayhaw.org/original/

    "The mayhaw is a Hawthorne native to the southeastern states that is normally a 20 - 30 foot tree at maturity. Usually found in low, wet, slightly acid areas, mayhaws produce best on good upland soils in full sun."
     
  14. Many pawpaw groves are composed of one mother tree and several root suckers that grow to full size. Pawpaws are not self pollinating, and since a root sucker is genetically the same tree, they will not properly pollinate. On the other hand, if your grove developed from separate seeds, they are genetically different plants and WILL pollinate. If yours is a root sucker grove, all clones of the same tree, you need to bring in an outside tree. If you sometimes develop fruit that matures, then you probably already have a different line in there somewhere.
    The pawpaw tree is pollinated by blowflies and carrion beetles, as opposed to bees. My grandpa use to empty the "pot" in the pawpaw patch early in the spring to draw flies. The simplest solution to pollination may be to hand pollinate, using a small artist type brush.
    If you try hand pollination, each flower will produce a "bunch" composed of 5 fruit. Best case scenario is that the fruit fall off one at a time and either one or two from the bunch develop. Like peaches or apples, the tree cannot possibly provide nutrients for all the fruit that potentially can develop. In a great blooming year like this, 90 to 95% of peaches and apples need to be thinned out in order for the remainder to maximize their potential. A similar situation exist with pawpaws, nature will generally take off the extras, you may need to help.
    Pawpaw trees need plenty of water, but don't need to be in a swampy bottom. too much or too little either one will affect them severely. Once you have a good fruit set, the key to picking them is after they start getting soft, and before the coons and possums come for them. You can give them a little squeeze to see if they're about right. ALSO, the skin usually develops yellow patches and/or brown or black spots. Looks rotten, but it's just the pawpaw way!
     
  15. TRAILRIDER

    TRAILRIDER Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for the info. Sounds like the best place for my young trees when they are ready will be the fence line of our hourse pasture. Its already got trees all down it. So It would be in the shade, and it is on a good slope too. I will have to protect the seedlings from horses and cows, but that can be done : ) I've just got to keep my fingers crossed til they are strong enough to transplant.
     
  16. TRAILRIDER

    TRAILRIDER Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Um, what is a tree tube? I use corrogated black plastic pipe cut lengthwise to protect the trunks of my fruit trees, is that what you mean?
     
  17. motdaugrnds

    motdaugrnds II Corinthians 5:7 Supporter

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    Great information about paw paws, Zong. Thank you