pasturization

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by afrikaner, Sep 28, 2005.

  1. afrikaner

    afrikaner Well-Known Member

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    ok folks,

    As you may well know, I'm aiming at a small homestead - maybe for profit in the future, but mostly to get away from utility companies for now...
    It will be a mostly self sufficient homestead except for soap, canned foods and a few other things. Milk is one of the major issues, as I have young kids and a wife that drinks more milk than an elephant calf on steroids.
    I aim to have a Dexter cow or two - how to go about milking them and pasturizing the milk?

    I know there are some machines out there that will do the milking for you (had them in Africa on grandfathers farm), but I really just need a small milking machine and pasturizer (correct?). Any ideas where to start looking and what price ranges?

    Thanks!
     
  2. mamalisa

    mamalisa Well-Known Member

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    Ummm...no need to pasturize your own milk from your own clean cow!!!!

    and for one or two cows, I would recommend handmilking, in which case all you need is a nice big stainless steel bucket--preferably with lid---and a bucket to hold soap and water, something to sit on, and a bunch of washcloths.

    I handmilk a Jersey. It's quite easy, after the first two weeks!---and I manage to do this while working a full-time job, with only one kid to help. We also have other critters. The dratted machines cost a small fortune and take forever to wash.
     

  3. afrikaner

    afrikaner Well-Known Member

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    Oh man, I really hate milking by hand! But if the machines cost too much, then it will have to happen. Keep in mind, I only got 9 fingers that actually work!
    As for pasturizatoin - my wife firmly beleives that all meat should come on styrofoam and wrapped in plastic - I have to acquire styrofoam plates and plastic wrapping when I get ready to slaughter - I kid you not - I had to do the same with animals I slaughtered in SA - the point is, she refuses to drink the milk if it is not pasturized.
     
  4. mamalisa

    mamalisa Well-Known Member

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    Yuck.

    I can drink fresh milk. I cannot drink store milk, eat store ice cream, or any such.

    But I do know what you mean. I had a husband like that. I divorced him, the kids and I are MUCH happier---and probably dirtier, too. But we're hardly ever sick.

    Lehman's has a pasturizer. It's about $300, I think. You can buy used bucket milkers for about $700.

    See why I handmilk? That is more than I paid for the cow!
     
  5. Bob_W_in_NM

    Bob_W_in_NM Well-Known Member

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    These people have bucket milkers too:

    http://www.partsdeptonline.com/

    Don't know anything about the company, good or bad.

    I wonder though, once you get the milk pasteurized, how is the wife going to handle the "un-homogenized" aspect of the milk? If she's used to drinking store bought milk out of a paperboard carton or a plastic jug, she's in for some "culture shock" at least.
     
  6. All country

    All country Well-Known Member

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    We drink our milk raw now have for the past 2 years now.

    Before that we pasteurized on the stove top. It's not difficult at all and required no special equipment. We put a 12 qt. stainless steel pot with about 4-5 inches of water in it on the stove then brought it to a boil. (you want the water to come up a bit on the sides of the second pan) As soon as the milk was strained we placed a second slightly smaller stainless steel pot into the pot on the stove. This made a sort of double boiler. We then just brought the temp. of the milk up as quickly as possible, you will need to keep stirring the milk for this. You will need a good thermometer to check the temp. of the milk. As soon as the milk got hot enough, we removed the smaller pan of milk and would place it in a sink of ice water. We would stir the milk around a few minutes to cool it then pour the milk into 1/2 gallon jars. We would then place those jars in a sink of fresh ice water and slosh them around until the milk was very cold. The quicker you get your milk cold the better the taste. We still cool our raw milk in jars of ice water.
     
  7. milkstoolcowboy

    milkstoolcowboy Farmer

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    For one cow, the cost of a bucket milker and pump is probably too high. Better to jus milk by hand.

    You can get a second-hand pasteurizer for much less than $300. Don't they sell them on ebay and other places.
     
  8. whodunit

    whodunit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Raw milk is much healthier because all the good bacteria and enzymes are intact.

    If there is any concern, I have heard that some people mix raw milk into store milk at increasing ratios, so it gives the body time to adjust to the influx of new, but good, bacteria.

    I was like your wife, in that milk has always come from a store, NOT from a cow. When my wife wanted to make the switch, I was grossed out.

    Now, after drinking fresh milk for the last few years, I would never go back.

    One time we took some frozen, store bought non-fat milk on a camping trip. Once it thawed, I absolutely could not drink it and we dumped it out.

    Also, on top of the health benefits, we also pay sometimes up to 75 cents LESS per gallon for farm fresh milk.
     
  9. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

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    Ask around on both counts. We got a used bucket milker for about $200 complete. Found another at a garage sale for less but it needed some work. Actually, we found the garage sale item first, then the other so we never got around to working the few kinks out of the first. Where are you Afrikaner? I'd love to part with the garage sale setup since it just sits around in my barn taking up space. It needs a new motor.

    I've gotten new and used parts through that website and was pleased with their service and prices. Ebay would be a great idea for a pasturizer, possibly a milking machine as well. I have a pasturizer from my parents that they used when we were kids. I don't worry about cooling my pasturized milk quickly and it always tastes fine to me. I just put it into glass gallon and half gallon jars and let it cool in the fridge. My fridge would probably appreciate if I'd cool it in a sink full of cold water though! ;) I let it sit for a day to get the cream to come to the top and then skim it off. I LOVE that cream! We use it for making butter, whipped cream, chocolate truffles, ice cream... All the good stuff! LOL!
     
  10. afrikaner

    afrikaner Well-Known Member

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    Thank you so much, Everyone. Fresh farm milk is the best. I grew up on it and you are correct, it takes some getting used to. I think I will try the even approach - a little bit at a time. Maybe she won't even notice :)
    I looked at all the different options - phew! Milkers are expensive!
    LongShadow, I am in Atlanta, GA. I will send you a PM regarding this matter.
    I think I will definitely have to get a milker - my 5 year old daughter will eventually take over the milking durities when she turns 7 - till then, I have to do it and will probably have to get out on the road early in the mornings to beat traffic - and I won't let the poor moo-moo's suffer by not milking them as expected.
     
  11. BlueRidge

    BlueRidge Well-Known Member

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    Read this, and you won't want store bought milk ever again!
     
  12. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    Never mind the "read this" things - I'm not entirely convinced there's enough in the "Pasteurisation destroys enzymes, etc" argument, but that's not the point, is it? You need to convince your wife, not yourself. Pull down whatever you can get, and let her read it.