pasture?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by beginnerfarmer, Jan 1, 2007.

  1. beginnerfarmer

    beginnerfarmer Well-Known Member

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    I am wondering how many sheeps and goats can u put on 2 to 3 acres of pasture? I am also wondering is better to have sheeps or goats? I looking to have a few livestock for meat.
     
  2. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    Which to have depends on which you prefer to eat. LOL I like lamb so I have sheep.
    As to how many, that depends on how good the pastures are. If you have lots of brush and trees, go with goats. If its more grass sheep will do better. I started with 7 sheep on one acre, then went to 5 acres. Now I have 30 sheep and 5 acres is not enough for year round. Im about to add 8 more acres in hopes of not having to supplement with hay at all with a flock of about 30 ewes. For 3 acres Id start with about 6 animals, and see how it goes. You can always get more with time and starting slow lets you learn as you go without being overwhelmed,



    There are too many variables to give a better answer without more info on your pastures and how you will manage them
     

  3. Jenn

    Jenn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I had up to 8 sheep on 3 acres in central TX which is worth about 1 acre in the MOntgomery area (I live S of you now). I am asking same questions- answer start small and see. Also consider rotational grazing to get the best out of your pasture instead of them eating away all the tasty plants so they die off and leave the weeds.

    Goat sheep decision: goats seem to browse more and get on trees and brush but my sheep sure did a number on my fruit trees when I asked them to mow my lawn! They also seem to go over fences a lot more easily but I never owned any personally.

    Sheep however need to be sheared and I was quite lucky in TX to find a 90 year old shepherd who didn't charge me too much (they wanted me to bring my miniflock to join a bigger flock where he was shearing) but I was unable to sell my wool. Had I kept sheep past that gentleman's retirement I mgiht've had to start shearing myself.

    Good luck and let me know what you do.
     
  4. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In Alabama I imagine you will want hair sheep. Goats, I don't know what kind. You can also milk sheep and goats, but you would need the right breeds. If I were you, I'd fence in an acre or two with three sheep. Goats are escape artists and if you can't keep sheep in, you will never keep goats in. Anyway, you can use portable electric fencing to rotate your little herd around. If you just let them all at the entire acreage you'll ruin your pasture. After a season, you will have a better idea how many sheep your pasture can support and if you need to seed anything. Sheep and goats prefer broad leafed plants over grass, so you can run cattle or horses or donkeys with them. You will probably need to mow at some point, once or twice a year.

    Take a good look at your land. If it is wet, you will want a breed of sheep that does not get hoof rot. You will also want a few ducks to eat snails, and a few chickens to help the ducks eat the flies.
     
  5. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    Sheep are really THE herd animal If you are going to have them get at least a Dozen .You can put several thousand in 3 acres but you will buy all their feed.Why sweat the Ultimate perfect number and just get a group you are happy with and plan on letting some feed go to waste sometimes and buying some feed sometimes?
    Now for the math
    BWAG=
    acres times tons of feed divided by about 1 ton per ewe per year
    SO
    6 to 15 happily with little feed costs
     
  6. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    SHEEP, SHEEP, SHEEP,SHEEP, SHEEP......Ok that's a little biased, i have sheep and mod the sheep forum. Goats stay a bit healthier, sheep stay alot better behind fences. I like both meats but you should keep the animal you like the best. Stockign rate is very subject to your local, you should aks at your local extension office or check out the neighbors. If all I had was 2 acres I'd only try 4 or 5, but Alabama is bound to have better growing conditions. If the average stocking rate is 8 sheep per acre on a 100 acre farm, you should consider of your 2-3 acres are top performing acres or 2-3 marginal acres. Better to start with fewer and build up, than over load from the start. Small acreages are mre difficult to maximize than large holdings so be conservative when trying to use the land.
     
  7. Old Vet

    Old Vet In Remembrance

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    Everybody has a opinion. Here is mine. It is what you like...... How many is dependant on what kind of pasture is avalible. Probily somewhere around 1 per acre. You can get more but you will have to feed them.
     
  8. beginnerfarmer

    beginnerfarmer Well-Known Member

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    I think its 8 sheeps or goats to one 1 acre, I think I will keep sheep since I like the meat.
     
  9. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    keep what ya like to raise, sell the excess over what ya eat,if ya dont eat any you can sell them all!
    Honestly I have found that likeing what you are raising makes a huge diference.If seen great hog men do horriably with cows and sheep. and vice versa. There is a guy locally who still does great with ostiches but lost his butt when he thought he could make better money with the more normal turkeys and labradors
     
  10. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Id get a sheep and some goats. Goats are, pound per pound worth as much or more than cows. If you find you could sell ther hair, than that might be the animal to raiseBy getting a sheep and some goats, you can get a chance to butcher one of each and thereby know which you like eating more. :eek:ssa variables there If you make the pasture goat tight, then you know its tight enough for both animals