parvo,anyones dog had it?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by bill thudmire, Apr 22, 2005.

  1. bill thudmire

    bill thudmire New Member

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    In the past week I had 2 dogs get it,my jack russel made,my red bone did not.
     
  2. MoonShine

    MoonShine Fire On The Mountain

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    I'm sorry to hear that. It's a terrible thing. If you have any other dogs,get them out of wherever you keep them...and remember,that stuff will stay in the ground for years to come...make sure not to have any other dogs in that area.

    Again,sorry to hear about your dog.
     

  3. Laura

    Laura Well-Known Member

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    I am sorry you lost your dog.

    We almost lost a pup to parvo a couple of years ago. I got her to the vet and she was given an IV to rehydrate her, then DD spent the next week syringing Pedialite into her. It seemed like a long time to full recovery as her intestinal walls needed to heal.

    The vet said that dehydration is what kills a dog with parvo.
     
  4. mtnmom208

    mtnmom208 Well-Known Member

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    Not a fun thing to see your pups go through. My dog had it a few years ago when he was young. I had to nurse him out of it and quarantine him. The vet sold me everything I needed rather than pay 5 times as much to leave him there. We think the fever and all of the shots I had to give him made him a bit loopy!
    Spread the word to your neighbors and vaccinate any dog that you can. I've heard that bleach water will kill it even on the ground but don't quote me on that. Just do everything you can to avoid a neighborhood epidemic.
    Good Luck.
     
  5. QueenB04

    QueenB04 Well-Known Member

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    We treated it alot at the clinic I worked at, mostly hunting dogs. The main problem is people think the vaccines they get from feed stores are affective. In truth they are not as they are a killed viral vaccine and do not effective protect the immune system. Veterinary vaccines are called high antigenic mass vaccines which effective strengthen and protect the puppies immune system. As I said we saw parvo mostly in hunting dogs and hunting kennels is because to buy the vaccines from a feed store it is cheaper and easier to buy in bulk then to take a pack to the vet for vaccination.
    One of the biggest problems with parvo is the virus can live in the ground the infected dog(dogs) were in for 1-2 years. An adult dog that has been properly vaccinated can host the virus and pass it on to unvaccinated dogs(of any age) and thus the virus spreads.
    Proper vaccination is the best method of preventing the disease.

    I'm sorry to hear the loss of your dog, it is a very heart breaking ordeal and especially with how parvo brings them down. Dehydration is the main cause of death, from the vomiting and diarrhea associated with the disease. Heart failure is often seen from the dehydration as well.

    My recomendation for you is to remove all feces in your yard or kennel area and take a bleach solution or straigh bleach and thoroughly saturate areas the infected animal was in, and where feces were found. This dramatically helps your chances of ridding your home of the disease, and prevent infection of other dogs.
    I would also make sure you fully vaccinate your surviving dog, and any others with DHLPPC vaccine. This stands for Distemper, Hepatits, Leptospirosis, Para-Influenza, Parvovirus, Corona. This should be given to puppies begining a 6-8wks, and 2 other courses 2 weeks apart from each other, and once yearly.

    I'm again sorry to hear that one of your dogs did not make it through this, however I am very happy to hear that the other did. I hope he is still doing fine and makes a full healthy recovery. I would try the bleach to prevent any further infections.
     
  6. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    Years ago when I worked with the human society, we had pups get dumped with that all the time... One of them we nursed back to health, with vet help and lots of chicken and rice for her.
    Then a few years back, my DH's pups got it. The first two he took to the vet, and they were too far gone. The vet quoted an outrageous bill to help the dogs too,,, then another pup came down with it. He had that one put down, then the last little pup got sick, DH couldnt put that one down. In his frustration, he went and got the pepto bismal and poured it down the pups throat regularly. Surprisingly, he survived! Now, if a dog gets sick, DH runs out there with the pepto...
    Not saying anyone should do this, just saying it is what DH did, and it worked....
     
  7. frogmammy

    frogmammy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Amen on the bleach thing. I do rescue and since I usually only do pups, end up with Parvo in the house...scarey thing! My standard treatment is to spray EVERYTHING under three foot tall with bleach water, isolate the parvo pup for 30 days, spray feet and lower legs with bleach water every time we take care of the pup.

    Last pup I got...had been told he was REALLY active...picked him up two hours from home and he slept all the way here. There was nothing in particular wrong with him, he just wasn't RIGHT...then next morning my Chow-BC would stand back and bark at him. She's done this before to pups with parvo, so I took him in to the vet...sure enough, it was Parvo.

    This was a Monday morning, around 10 am. I immediately called the rescue co-ordinater to tell her to alert the other people who had pups from this litter that mine had parvo and theirs probably did too. The other four people who had pups were at work and couldn't take their dogs to the vet until they got off work. The shelter began euthenizing the dogs that were in the wing the pups had been in :waa: (There's a reason I'm going into all this!)

    My pup stayed at the vet's overnight with IV's, meds, and came home to isolation with continued meds the next day...vet said no reason to expose a sick pup to all the illness that came into the clinic.

    The pups that had diagnosis/treatment started six hours later....one of the pups died, one spent a week, another 10 days at the vet's and one that was VERY sick spent three weeks in the hospital...it looked like we were going to lose him several times. All these dogs had different vets.

    Parvo is a VERY fast moving illness...once had a pup that died within six hours of symptoms. Last I heard, Rotts were one breed that had an especially hard time with Parvo...there are other breeds too, but I forget which ones. Literally, hours can mean the difference between life and death, and, cost of treatment.

    Hate Parvo!!!!

    Mon
     
  8. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    check out www.ambertech.com

    I had a case of F strain in my alpha male Jacob, my tips would be, NO soild food for 2 weeks, NONE, even if they want it the gut is too tender and it increases scaring, Jacob has to have food suppliments because he can not absorb the nutrition he needed from reg food anymore, due to the scaring in his intestines. I use Garden of Life Brand whole Food powder and gave proboitics.

    That was over 3 years ago and he is the best working dog I have ever been around.

    Jacob was vaccinated and got it anyway, his brother Shadow did not get it, but I treated both just the same. None of the puppies Jacob has produced have been vaccinated for it and they have so far not gotten it.
     
  9. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    Hi Thumper! :) We have a mutual acquaintence. She met you at Sharon Babtist church when you spoke about gardening. She asked you about planting trees in clay.I know that this is totally off subject,but I couldn't pass up the chance to comment about what a small world this really is. I've seen parvo in puppies & it is ugly. I've lost a few to this disease & It does stay around. Bleach is a way to fight it but it doesn't always work. I used to let my puppies be born in my garage. I had a couple of rounds of parvo that bleach didn't kill,so I moved the pups out of the garage.No more parvo. I've put about 10gal of bleach onto that garage & I haven't had any more parvo,but I don't do puppies anymore.
     
  10. qtkitty

    qtkitty Well-Known Member

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    Our last dog ... my first dog .. had parvo .. he was a free dog the neighbors didn't want ... i thought i had poisoned him with over the counter wormer*lol*

    He spent his second week with us in the Vets. He made it but was very latched on to me after that.

    The vet said that the virus stays alive in the soil for like 6 months, but the best thing to do was definately pick up all pooh after him and make sure all the neighbors dogs that could happen across some of his pooh residue had their parvo shots .. and if we got any dogs with in the nest 6months to a year to make sure they had parvo shots before we took them home.
     
  11. Peepsqueak

    Peepsqueak Well-Known Member

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    I had a dog with parvo and it was a puppy that the previous owner did not give shots to so he ended up with parvo...long story.

    Anyway, I treated the parvo myself. I put an iv in the dog, and used ringer's solution for 4 days. He had diahrrea and no appetite. I also gave him an antibiotic to prevent infection because his immune system is weak. I got some antibiotic from work. He was kept in the shower stall and I rinsed him down every day to keep the diahrrea from bothering him.....

    He was also kenneled to keep him from pulling out his Iv. Luckily he was small at the time he got it so I only needed about 4 bags of ringers. (Ringers is very expensive) Anyway, it worked out and he got better.

    He was put on a light diet when he was recovering so as to not have too much food on his stomach (rice and light meat....chicken)

    It takes about 7 days for the virus to flush through the system. You can push fluids orally but it is chancey because it doesn't flush fast enough.....and the virus can dehydrate the dog and kill him. Anyway, I am not a vet, but I managed to overcome this incident. I do reccommend using a professional though because there can be complications. When I was going to leave my puppy there it would have cost me 600.00 for a parvo treatment and hospital stay and they wanted their money up front. They would not even take a partial payment...I was devastated.

    Anyway the good Lord blessed me and my dog anyway.
     
  12. tltater

    tltater Well-Known Member

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    I worked in an emergency veterinary hospital and have seen my fair share and then some. Like all vaccines, human or otherwise, they are not 100% effective. Some dogs just get it but vaccines are the only way to control it as well as it has. I also agree with the person who posted about using vet vaccs instead of feed store vaccs. You just don't know if they kept them cool during all the shipping processes, and how well they are made.

    The next thing I would like to add is that some pups just get sick. It may look like parvo, smell like parvo, but it isn't. The only true way to tell if a dog has parvo is with a parvo test. They use fecal matter to test it to see if this is truly what it is. I have seen dogs with what is called hemoragicgastroenteritis (not sure if it's spelled right!) that have the same symptoms. When a young pup presents itself with the vomitting and diarhea alot of vets automaticly call it parvo and treat it as such. In my experience, true parvo is vomiting, diarhea with lots of blood in it that is the nastiest smelling stuff you have ever seen, no appetite, extremely lethargic(can hardly even lift head), drewling and will not drink.

    In the vet hospital I worked at they also reccomended bleach for cleaning and killing the virus and keeping any other dogs out of that area for at least one year. The virus spreads very easily and is highly contagious.
     
  13. Mel-

    Mel- Well-Known Member

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    how to vets and clinics get rid of parvo with all of the dogs that have it coming through?

    my dogs are 2 years old, they had all of their puppy shots and their yearly shots at one year old but I didn't get their shots last year. I've read some things against yearly shots and am still not sure where i stand but am going to take mine in to at least get the required rabies this year. I've read to also get at least rabies and parvo.

    so is it safe to take my guys in to the vets if they missed their shots last year?
     
  14. Vera

    Vera Well-Known Member

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    Mel, I think it'd be safe, but maybe our vet people can tell you whether it is or not.

    Rabies shots are something I wouldn't think twice about. Even if it's not the law where you are, you don't want to take any risk with rabies.

    As for the other shots, I think that it's important to make a sound decision between what's necessary/appropriate and preventing over-vaccination. That's a purely personal opinion though.

    A few years ago, I was working for a couple whose dog had just died of parvo. Apparently, the previous owner of the property had had an infected dog, and the virus stayed around long enough to infect these people's dog. If I remember right, several other dogs in town got parvo around that time, people scrambled to get their dogs immunized and their properties treated to prevent it from turning into a local epedemic, and things quieted down again.
    Now I heard recently that there's been a case of parvo in a small town just over the state line in New Mexico, so parvo is once again something to be wary of around here.

    Keeping track of which particular diseases are "happening" in your area makes it easier to keep your dogs from getting sick without overimmunizing them, but of course it makes a big difference how much interaction yours have with others, and if they have free access to potentially infected areas. If they do, I'd definitely get them the recommended shots/preventative meds.
     
  15. barstowmama

    barstowmama Member

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    Hello!
    Sorry about the loss of any pups to parvo. It's a horrible disease and I've only lost one pup to parvo. I was told by a veteranarian (sic?) that parvo to dogs is like stomach flu to humans, and so to get rid of parvo, treat the pup like you would yourself. I was told to give pepto bismol (stops the diarrhea), liquid baby motrin (gets rid of fever) and pedialyte-bubble gum flavor (for electrolyte imbalance). Haven't lost a pup since. You do have to do the bleach thing in your yard and anywhere the dog has had access to. Parvo stays in the soil and any subsequent pup you have in your yard that hasn't been immunized will wind up with parvo. I hope this has helped someone. It really did work for me. Good luck!

    barstowmama
     
  16. QueenB04

    QueenB04 Well-Known Member

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    Mel,

    Bleach, bleach, bleach. Or any industrial medical grade disinfectant. We used bleach, and everything the infected dog may of come in contact with was sanitized. Veterinary clinics have isolation units in which dogs with parvo and other contagious diseases are kept. Therefore it is very safe to take your unvaccinated dogs to the vet. Generally when a dog comes into the clinic that has parvo or symptoms of such they are taken to an isolated exam room as well. This assures that other dogs, especially those younger or in for surgical proceedures are kept in an enviornment free from the viral infected dog.

    I have to take my 6 week old litter to the vet this week Mel and they have had several parvo puppies brought in in recent weeks. I'm really not concerned with my animals catching the disease. As long as my exposure, and my animals is non existent to the infected dog(s) and all precautions are taken such as washing hands after coming in contact with other animals in the office I feel fine. Common sense and back yard hygene is the best way to reduce the risk of catching it or passing it to other animals.


    Tltater also brought up another good point, that I did not address. Just because the dog is vomiting and has diarrhea does not mean it is parvo. However it is something that you should get checked out. Also that alot of vets do label dogs as 'parvo like' if they are exhibiting these symptoms. Alot of puppies and younger dogs do have vomiting and diarrhea, this can be simple colitis, worms, eating a foreign object, some immune disorders or other internal medical problems. Any unusual symptoms that persist for more then 18-48hrs should be checked by a vet. Sometimes even that window can be too late, but if the symptoms are strong and persistent within the course of a few hours and noticable lethargy is seen I would get the animal to a vet ASAP.

    Other diseases that can affect older dogs with similar symptoms are leoptospirosis(also a vaccincation), very similar to parvo symptoms and almost equally as lethal if proper treatment is not given in a timley manner. Whip worms are interesting, they will cause weight loss, lethargy, dehydration, vomiting and a very runny foul smelling diarrhea with usually contains blood passed through the stool.

    Parvo however is very distinct as Tltater said you cannot mistake the smell of the stool, and generally the smell of the dog. It is a very foul gutwrenching smell.

    Prevention is key, vaccination, sanitation and common sense. Like with you and I proper health care counts.