Parasites in deer meat??

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by ginnie5, Jan 1, 2005.

  1. ginnie5

    ginnie5 wife,mom,taxi driver,cook Supporter

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    Bought a new dehydrator this past week. Got one of those jerky shooters too. Dh loves playing around with that kind of stuff. We pulled some ground venison out of the freezer and thawed it and made the jerky. After all this he decides to read the instructions. They say to not use any game that has not been in a deep freeze for at least 30 days due to parasites. This meat was put up in December. Anyone ever heard of this before? I'd hate to eat it thinking worms were going to start growing in me!
     
  2. It's true, but don't worry your just getting extra protein. It's basically the same with all animals whether domestic or wild. Espescially pork meat. However I thought 15 days was the minimum before thawing to eat unless you will be cooking til well done. Then you can eat immediately.
     

  3. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    a hunting friend of mine who was a surgeon told me to always check the liver of any a animal when I was field dressing it- and a liver that was spotted or looked unhealthy meant the animal probably shouldn't be eaten.He also wouldn't eat any animal displaying unnatural behaviour-lethargic, he would shoot it and if possable notify the local game warden.Most of them won't cancel your tag for that, or if you do cancel your tag[which you are required to do before touchinga downed annimal] will issue you a new one free of charge
     
  4. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    also have they got that Mad cow diesease in Deer under control? I heard they had a outbreak up in winconsin.
     
  5. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    Wouldn't worry about it.

    big rockpile
     
  6. ginnie5

    ginnie5 wife,mom,taxi driver,cook Supporter

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    well by the time I get the deer its already field dressed and quartered so no idea what the liver looked like. I don't think I'm going to worry too much about it. That jerky smells just too good to pass on! Haven't heard of any mad cow disease in the deer around here and when we processed this one it was the BEST looking meat I've seen all year. The roasts from this one were perfect! He was a nice big buck but just as tender as can be and not at all fatty. Looked like healthy meat to me. Much better than anything I see in the grocery store.
     
  7. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That was a couple counties over from our property up there, but we haven't heard much about CWD (not the same as Mad Cow, but caused by a similar prion). All they did last year was have the hunters bring in the head of their kill so the brains could be tested for prions.

    Technically, it's okay to eat the animal as long as you don't eat anything having to do with the nervous system (brains, spines, tails). Some folk are not eating ANY organ meat, just the muscle, to be on the safe side.

    There were lots of billboards up last year, saying to keep hunting so that the disease could be controlled. Some think it can be traced to deer blocks that were made from foreign animal meat (sheep infected with scrapie?).

    Either way, I'll still eat venison, and I'd be proud to accept an offer of that jerky if I was at Ginnie's house.
     
  8. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) One of the interesting side effects I started thinking about with parasites in deer was regarding the rescue groups ...the orphaned or injured deer that are taken in are wormed for parasites before release. The wild deer carries around a half dozen species of internal parasites at any one time. The withdrawal time before eating them is from 21 to 48 days.

    Made me wonder about eating deer, if any released, rehabbed individuals were shot and then harvested for the table? Hmmmm? I am not a bit worried about the parasites themselves..as noted, all species have their own, wild and domestic...but wormers?

    Food for thought, so to speak....LOL LQ
     
  9. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) One of the interesting side effects I started thinking about with parasites in deer was regarding the rescue groups ...the orphaned or injured deer that are taken in are wormed for parasites before release. The wild deer carries around a half dozen species of internal parasites at any one time. The withdrawal time before eating them is from 21 to 48 days.

    Made me wonder about eating deer, if any released, rehabbed individuals were shot and then harvested for the table? Hmmmm?

    I didn't use to worry about eating venison at all, but I wouldn't do it now. Not with all of the "imported" problems brought here by the "shrinking" of our world and the influx of illegal immigrants right along with what they may carry in with them and then "deposit" in the woods.

    I know this will sound dumb..but never in my life did I ever think of an asian running around in the woods hunting deer!

    Food for thought, so to speak....LOL LQ
     
  10. reluctantpatriot

    reluctantpatriot I am good without god.

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    You are more likely to get sick from commercial agriculture products like factory farm meats, eggs and produce than you are from a wild animal. Unless the wild animal, or plant, had some thing visibly and clearly wrong with it, the meat will be fine. Besides, the jerky process is what keeps the meat from spoiling and having little critters live in it.

    Drying, smoking and salting meat have been methods used for centuries to preserve it. Just make sure the animal didn't look sick or act out of character for its species and you should be fine.

    I also avoid the cerebral-spinal area for meat, but I do cut into the bones to process it. I am still working on the methods to cut the meat off without needing to do that. However, I don't worry too much about it here in Missouri. I am concerned, yes, but not worried.
     
  11. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

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    Deer meat I wouldn't worry about.
    Bear is probably the game meat they had in mind with those instructions. People used to get trichinosis from undercooked pork, but now almost all cases come from eating infected, undercooked bear meat.
     
  12. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    ever see a cow pasture without deer in it?
    Do you think all farmers worm thier cattle?
    Do you suppose that deer and cows carry the same parisites?

    I eat raw to rare fresh venison every year, wish I would get some of them there parisites, might lose a little weight!
     
  13. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    just dont eat the head or spines....
    .
    deep freeze isnt the same as a home freezer. a home freezer isnt as cold as a "deep freezer".

    still between drying and freezing its ok.

    you can make jerk from cooked meat, or so I am told.
     
  14. ergoman

    ergoman Well-Known Member

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    Regarding the post about boning out the meat above. I've always boned the meat, at first because the bone fines and marrow that slides over the meat when using a saw gross me out. I do it now because its faster and easier to prep the meat. I dont make burger, usually steaks and roasts, sometimes jerky. I take 2-3 deer a year. Skin, quarter, fillet the neck if big enouph, take out the backstrap and loin. Taking the meat off the rear quarters is easy using a fillet knife, (also good for cutting up the meat to steaks if the meat is warm). Just follow the leg bone with the knife, then cut around it while pulling on the bone. You'll wind up with two big chunks of meat, the color and texture tell you which are the tenderest, (for steaks) and which are coarse, (for roasts). Just jump in and do it, its not very hard. I can skin,cut and wrap in 2-3 hrs per deer.
     
  15. Boleyz

    Boleyz Prognosticator, Artist

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    I've made jerky for years on a dehydrator. I don't like the ground-type jerky. I usually thin-slice my hams at about 1/16" and then marinate the sliced meat in my secret recipe which contains a good bit of salt.

    The salting/drying process kills anything in the meat, and I've never had a problem...It's really no different than taking a fresh ham and salting/smoking it into a country ham.
     
  16. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't worry about it either, lots of other stuff going to kill me before the deer meat does, I reckon.
    Besides I trust deer meat more than the "mega stores".
     
  17. Snowdancer

    Snowdancer Well-Known Member

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    Here's some info to help you enjoy a safer product-especially if you're giving it to younger kids or senior citizens. :)

    http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/jerky_and_food_safety/index.asp
     
  18. chamoisee

    chamoisee Well-Known Member

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    I wonder if you could stick the jerky in the oven, bring the temp up to 160 F, and then cool it down again. That should kill any parasites, etc.
     
  19. Snowdancer

    Snowdancer Well-Known Member

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    Cham, that's what I do. :cool: I don't know if it's a USDA approved method but it gets it to temp and should kill any parasites. ;) :)
     
  20. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I've heard of dipping the strips in hot marinade (170*) to kill bacteria, it would prob work for parasites too.