Paper towel for strainer?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by bbbuddy, Sep 25, 2006.

  1. bbbuddy

    bbbuddy Well-Known Member

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    Hi y'all!
    We got an "almost Kinder" - she's 1/2 Nubian and 1/2 Pygora, and she has delicious milk, without doing any quick chilling etc.

    I ran out of milk filters, and have just been pouring the milk into a jar with a thick type plain white paper towel in the neck of the jar, seems to work just fine. Any reason not to do this?

    As a matter of fact, I milk directly into a glass jar, cap it, and put it into fridge. Then I take the 1/2 full jar out for a second milking right into the cold milk, THEN I filter it all into a new jar. So I am only filtering once for 2 milkings...
    milk tastes great and stays good for at least a week.

    So...why not just use the paper towel filter?
     
  2. TennesseeMama23

    TennesseeMama23 Well-Known Member

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    If I were to run out of filters I would use coffee filters cut to fit my strainer. I would think paper towels are more likely to break down and leave little pieces of paper in my milk-you couldn't see the tiny pieces in milk. Just put a paper towel in a jar of water for a few minutes and see what happens.
     

  3. prairiecomforts

    prairiecomforts Well-Known Member

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    In a pinch - I have used cheesecloth. Never thought of the coffe fliters.
     
  4. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't like to use a paper towel for the reason that they break down too easy and are likely to leave little pieces you can't see in the milk. I have used cheesecloth, coffee filters, clean dish-cloths or even cleaning rags in a pinch..... :shrug:
     
  5. bbbuddy

    bbbuddy Well-Known Member

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    These paper towels are the thick stretchy kind, they don't seem to break down like the thin papery ones.

    I would use coffee filters, but don't have those either. We drink instant laced with hot chocolate. :)
     
  6. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hey, whatever works for you! :) I think its well worth it to keep a piece of cheesecloth around for the odd straining job. We strained our Jersey cow milk for about 6 years using cheesecloth.
    I don't have coffee filters around either as I don't drink coffee. :) I had to buy the filters when I did use them for milk, but I prefer the cheesecloth.
     
  7. crowinghen

    crowinghen Well-Known Member

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    We routinely use paper towels to filter the milk -- but they HAVE to be Bounty or else they wither into nothing.
    PLus they are perforated in just the right spot for my strainer.
    Susie
     
  8. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

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    Paper towels work great for me, however I only use them when I'm out of regular filters. Only drawback, they take much longer to filter the milk. Tennessee john
     
  9. bbbuddy

    bbbuddy Well-Known Member

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    ok, glad to see the milk filters are not absolutely necessary... :)
     
  10. goatmarm

    goatmarm Well-Known Member

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  11. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A little thread drift here, but actually commercial dairies that sell to the milk plants add one, two, or even three days milk together before pick-up. Its not the best for the flavour though....I wouldn't do it for home use. Adding warm milk to cold milk several times is almost always going to make the milk taste "off".
     
  12. bbbuddy

    bbbuddy Well-Known Member

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    Well I milk right into the cold morning milk at night. Then filter it all. One goat is NOT a dairy, lol. The milk tastes great, never any goaty or off flavor.
     
  13. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We have done the same thing many a time. I wasn't referring to you milking at home, just my experience with dairies and bulk tanks. Makes a difference especially when its one doe versus 100. :)
     
  14. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    emily how long do you need to milk your 75 does?
     
  15. allenslabs

    allenslabs Saanen & Boer Breeder

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    I always use paper towels but they have to be bounty. Everything else seems to take forever and with bounty it just falls right through. I don't like the coffee filters..... they seem to take too long. But I've used bounty for 11/2 years and sure hope there's nothing wrong with it!! HAHAHA!!
     
  16. moosemaniac

    moosemaniac Well-Known Member

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    I've used coffee filters in a pinch without problem.

    Ruth
     
  17. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    More thread drift... :p

    The thing about the milk being stored in bulk tanks is it is *filtered* during each milking. All the milk put in has been run through a strainer (unless someone goofs) and the milk should be in the process of being cooled down as it is added to the tank.
    The filtering is the key here.
    Keep in mind, if you have little bits of whatever in that milk that is cooling in the fridge you are giving the nasties a chance to multiply. Cool milk also is a bit more work to filter throough the normal filters as well. It thickens.
    :)
     
  18. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It takes about 3 hours morning and evening.....with a better set-up I could run them through in *much* less time...... :)
     
  19. chamoisee

    chamoisee Well-Known Member

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    No, don't do that. Paper towels have dioxins from the bleaching process, and probably other chemicals, to. They weren't ever intended for milk filtering, and so the company is probably allowed to do all sorts of things to paper towels that they wouldn't be able to with coffee filters.

    Cloth lets sediment through, don't use cloth unless you are *ultra* clean in your milking procedure and the area is not dusty. Also, the cloths should be boiled after use, not just rinsed and hung up to dry.

    Coffee filters are too danged slow, especially if you have LOTS of milk.

    Now, I know I'm going to get a lot of criticism about this, what did the pioneers and such use for milk filters, etc... Folks, the pioneers had nothing else to use. They died off young and at a horrific rate due to greater exposure to diseases and other hazards. Their life was <i>not</i> a walk in the park. A lot of why we are living longer now is due very simply to improved sanitation.

    So, what I'd suggest is to get a couple gallons of fresh milk, and filter it into 3-4 different jars, using: milk filter, coffee filter, cloth, and paper towel. Then compare the filtering materials for hair, manure, other dirt, and sediment, and get back to us. Actually, I'd be happy to do it, but my goats are at my ex's now and he milks them. :(
     
  20. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The best filter I ever had was tightly woven piece of cheesecloth. We wash it after every use and get many uses from it. Used it to filter the milk from our Jersey cows for around 6 years. Milk was always exceptionally clean. Used a rubber band around the jug lip, to hold it in place.