paper as fuel

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by crobar, Oct 3, 2006.

  1. crobar

    crobar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    135
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2006
    anyboby know a simple way to burn waste paper as fuel with out sending charred pieces up chimney and all over the neighborhood. At my job I could easily carry home enough to heat a house or shop. Only interested in cheap easy ways.
     
  2. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,249
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2005
    Location:
    A short way past Oddville
    To burn---I wouldn't waste your time if you're after clean, cheap, and easy. You'd be better off stacking the bundles of paper around your house as insulation than trying to heat by burning it.
     

  3. frazzlehead

    frazzlehead AppleJackCreek Supporter

    Messages:
    3,717
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    near Edmonton AB
    There are devices that will make a log out of used newspaper, perhaps something like that would work?

    You'd have to google ... try paper log maker, I found a few right away.
     
  4. SmartAZ

    SmartAZ Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    204
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2006
    You'll have to carry the ashes out almost every day!
     
  5. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

    Messages:
    19,813
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    I know I read somwhere that if you soak the paper in some solution (salt may have been involved) after you use the paper log roller, you don't get as much messy ash.

    You should clean the firebox frequently anyway, though.

    I agree with Frazzlehead -- try Google.

    Pony!
     
  6. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

    Messages:
    5,398
    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Location:
    SW Missouri near Branson (Cape Fair)
    I am told that a broom handle works for rolling up newspapers.

    I am going to investigate using old paper and other biomass for making briquettes for an alternative fuel source, however it is not a quick and easy process!

    donsgal
     
  7. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

    Messages:
    6,465
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Location:
    Forests of maine
    We used to have a newspaper rolling machine.

    Roll the logs tight and you do not have to add anything to the water but you can. Potassium Nitrate is the best salt to add.

    We quit doing it as our machine died. But it does make really cheap logs that burn very well.

    If you have access to free newspaper, then do it. Make four a day, and set them to soaking for a day. Each day take out the previous day's logs to let them drain and dry. and you would have an ongoing supply of logs for your fire.

    Good luck.
     
  8. jross

    jross swamper

    Messages:
    1,040
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2006
    Location:
    New Jersey
    I take some newspaper and roll it up tight into toilet paper or paper towel tubes for fire starters.
     
  9. crobar

    crobar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    135
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2006
    et1 ss, what type of stove did you use, did you have flakes of charred paper up the chimney & did rolls burn completely? Would it work if paper rolls was all you had?
     
  10. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

    Messages:
    6,465
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Location:
    Forests of maine
    We were using a potbelly stove [cast iron] with copper tubing wrapped around the stovepipe heating water that circulated through a car radiator with a fan in the back bedroom.

    I never saw any indications of 'flakes'.

    The rolls did burn completely, they did leave ash, but all wood leaves ash.

    IMHO, dry newsprint rolled tight, will not work. We tried. The newsprint does not to be soaked in water, and dried. It somehow changes the makeup of the wood pulp, to burn better.

    We did use the Potassium Nitrate salts, and if I recall, when we used the salt in the water, the resulting logs would burn good. If we did not use the salts, then there was a slight tendency for the logs to go out. But we fixed that by burning multiple logs, or adding coal to the firebox, so long as something else was in the firebox with the paper-log then it would burn fine w/o the salts.

    If you soak with the salts, then I do believe that you could use paper-logs as 90% of your fuel source.

    Junk-mail and kindling, would still be used.

    Right now in our stove we use a little junk-mail and kindling maybe 1% to 5%;
    then wood accounts for maybe 10%;
    and then coal and peat moss make up the remainder of our heat source.
     
  11. crobar

    crobar Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    135
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2006
    How about copier paper rolled with the newsprint & how long do the logs need to dry to burn?
     
  12. Tabitha

    Tabitha greenheart

    Messages:
    1,751
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2006
    Location:
    Ky
    do you have an old tubß fill it with water, soak the paper, then scoop it out and bunch it together to let it dry. my folks borrowed some gizmo that pressed the soaked paper into bricks, they burned like coal. It was work, but what isn't.
     
  13. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

    Messages:
    6,465
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Location:
    Forests of maine
    What we did was roll them first, then soak, then dry, then burn. That way you are only trying to roll them as dry material.

    Setup an assembly line area. A box with newsprint, a rolling area where you will roll a few logs each day, a big tub to soak them in, a basin to stand them up in and drain the run-off back into the tub, and a secondary drying stack. If you process five rolls each day from each stage of the assembly line onto the next stage. Then it would give you a continuous supply of five logs per day. Let them soak for an entire day, let them drain for an entire day, let them really dry for a second day [we used to stack them around the back wall behind the stove to warm them and encourage faster drying].
     
  14. afrikaner

    afrikaner Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    107
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2005
  15. silvergirl

    silvergirl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    201
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2006
    Location:
    NC
    We go to the recycling depot to pick up newspaper - they are glad to give it away - and we are planning to make papercrete logs (minus the cement and sand you would add to make building materials!) You soak the paper in water for a few hours at least - shred it first if you have a paper shedder - then blend it up with your drill and a weed wacker blade - and pour it out into a mold with small holes in the bottom... the water drains out, the papercrete brick dries, and voila - you have a free burnable brick that does not produce floating ashes! Yes, we tried it, and it works...
    Silvergirl
     
  16. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

    Messages:
    28,248
    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Location:
    SE Missouri
    Wonder how they would do with some waste veggie oil on the paper logs?
     
  17. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

    Messages:
    11,456
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2004
    Location:
    NW Pa./NY Border.
    I have an endless supply of newspaper... how long does each brick burn?
     
  18. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,278
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2004
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    It is highly unlikely that paper bricks would have more energy per pound then firewood. They are talking about pressing one brick every 45 seconds, and that doesn't include soaking and the rest of the nonsense required. I'd bet that in 45 seconds I can split 10 pounds of firewood. I can't see these paper bricks being a reasonable alternative to wood in North America.

    Pete
     
  19. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

    Messages:
    6,465
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Location:
    Forests of maine
    Right now, I am on 150 acres of forest land, so my ready resource is wood. To get newsprint I need to drive 25 miles into the city, and back. So for me the readily available fuel is wood or peat.

    However there have been times when I lived in towns, and wood was not as readily available. So newsprint was more available to me. It is an industry by-product and available for free. So why not heat for free.

    :)