Painting orchard trees

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by nanu, Nov 19, 2004.

  1. nanu

    nanu Member

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    Question about painting fruit trees Latex Paint, or Lime and water? How high and how often?
     
  2. WV Rebel

    WV Rebel Well-Known Member

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    Hi Nanu.

    Paint them up as high as the sun will not reach the bare bark, probably up to the fork(s) in the tree and past about 6". If you paint in the crotches real well, it will also keep the rain from rotting them out and the bugs out.

    In our MG class they told us that the paint is for keeping the tree cool and therefore the bark not splitting, so it is very important to get a good coat on the South side. But all the way around is okay. If the bark splits, it allows for disease and destructive bugs and the sun WILL split them.

    You can use latex paint. Latex is extracted from the milkweed plant and is therefore organic. But don't drink it, it'll give ya a belly ache.
     

  3. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Most of the protection (not all) is due to the color of the paint. By my observation, in California they used to re-paint whenever the white paint started looking faded.
     
  4. WV Rebel

    WV Rebel Well-Known Member

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    Yes, white reflects heat, paint deters bugs.
     
  5. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

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    Hi- so am i supposed to paint the trunks of my tiny fruit trees here in montana too>?
     
  6. WV Rebel

    WV Rebel Well-Known Member

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    Soitney! That is -- if you want to protect them.
     
  7. Jay1

    Jay1 Active Member

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    Sisterpine: Wrap trees to keep’ em cool, not warm (also, paint with white latex paint):

    http://www.montana.edu/wwwpb/pubs/mt9518.pdf

    Received this information in the mail yesterday, from our electrical co op. Was just reading when I saw this post. Hopefully we can get this done before snow sticks! Good luck!
     
  8. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

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    Thanks folks, I will get right on it!
     
  9. BJ

    BJ Well-Known Member

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    I just happened across this thread and I am curious about it. I've never heard anyone recommend painting fruit trees? Will this retard growth or in any way damage the tree? Will it really help protect bark from summer heat? :confused:
     
  10. MsPacMan

    MsPacMan Well-Known Member

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    I have just planted about 20 - 25 fruit trees, most of them just in the last two months.


    Is this correct, that I should paint them with white latex paint? If so, when should I do it? In the winter, or wait till spring?


    I'm in zone 7, in west Tennessee.
     
  11. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The idea behind painting young tree trunks is to protect them from sunscald and cracking and splitting. They need to be kept cold; otherwise, the bark warmed from the sun during the day refreezes at night . . . and will split, opening an avenue for diseases and insects to invade the tree. Not good.

    So, a white paint is usually recommended, and latex, being water based, won't hurt the tree. Wrapping the trunk does the same, but the wrapping needs to be removed every spring and put back on every fall. Paint can be left on and renewed as necessary.