painting furniture

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by marvella, Jan 2, 2007.

  1. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    i've got some furniture i've been dragging around most of my life. i figure, might as well keep on using it, nothing wrong with it, except it looks it's age.

    i'd like to paint it before moving to the new house. past attempts at painting furniture haven't been anything to write home about. because of an allergy, it ideally should be latex (not oil based) paint.

    would it help if i sanded down the furniture first? i really don't have time or energy to completely refinish them. they're not really worth the effort either. a coat of a nice dark brown paint will suit us both.

    so, can i like rough up the old paint/ old finish with sandpaper, or a sanding disk thingy on a drill? then paint? will it stick?

    help? please?? thanks all!!
     
  2. The Paw

    The Paw Well-Known Member

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    I think it depends on what the finish is that you are sanding. If you are painting over oiled wood, varnish, urethane, or an earlier coat of paint.

    As a general rule, a light sanding (then wiping with a tack cloth) will help your new paint adhere. Washing with TSP is also good. You can also get a "universal primer", that will adhere to a variety of finishes. This is particularly useful if you are planning to put a coat of latex on top of an older coat of oil based paint.

    So to recap, light sanding, wipe clean, universal primer, an acrylic latex.

    good luck.
     

  3. free-2-b-me

    free-2-b-me Well-Known Member

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    Wash it down with TSP and use Zizners BIN primer . Don't use BIN 123 though - it doesn't work as well as the regular BIN . Then paint with an acrylic or latex paint.
     
  4. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    Please don't use a sanding disc on a drill. Most people using them simply leave horrible sanding swirls on their material and then paint over them in frustration. Looks quite horrible.

    Some of the newer sprayable water based latexes might be just the thing for a smoother finish. I've not used them but they are even using them on autos for a good durable finish.
     
  5. Nette

    Nette Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've painted lots of furniture and echo what The Paw said, "light sanding, wipe clean, universal primer, an acrylic latex." One suggestion I have is to use primer in the spray cans--makes the task go super-quick. Another suggestion is for the final color--I'd go with white or either a colorful-color. If you go with dark brown, it still won't look like wood, so you might as well be adventurous. I furnished a week-end farmhouse with freebie odds and ends from everywhere. If you paint most (not all--danger of overkill) of the furniture in one room the same color, it will look like it all came together. For color inspiration, I just used everyday things. For example, I took a yellow post-it note and a tube of Clinique lip-stick (you know--Clinique green) to the hardware store and said "I want these colors." The post-it note bedroom and the Clinique bedroom have gotten lots of compliments.
     
  6. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    thank you all! you make it sound easy. :)

    got a few questions tho... what's a tack cloth? or TSP? universal primer sounds like a great idea!

    about colors... there is plenty of color in the walls, upholstery, etc. it needs brown. believe me. i like brown. :)

    what will be painted is two end tables, an old cedar chest, an old oak dining table (with a failed/ failing coat of latex from my last effort) and 6 ladder back chairs (see dining table.)

    off to get supplies. :hobbyhors
     
  7. The Paw

    The Paw Well-Known Member

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    A tack cloth is a slightly tacky cloth that the sawdust will stick to when you wipe it. I don't actually use one myself, but am always reading about them. It is not absolutely necessary.

    TSP is trisodium phosphate (I think). It comes in crystals, often in a container like a pint of milk. There are usually instructions on the side about how much water & crystals to mix for various uses. It is good for removing the residue of dirt, grease, sawdust etc. After washing with TSP, I usually "rinse" with a rag wet in clear water and let dry.

    As mentioned above, a sanding disk is overkill. You are best doing it by hand, with sandpaper wrapped around a sanding block or stiff sponge.
     
  8. Trixie

    Trixie Well-Known Member

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    If you have allergies to paints, I would be concerned about the primer whose name starts with Z. We have always used Kilz when we needed primer and it had a scent, but not too bad. We bought some of the'Z' primer at Wal Mart. We used it over new beaded board panels. It did the job well, but we had to sleep on the couch for a night until the odor left. It was bad.

    I use either SOS pads, or fine steel wool with some soap. Of course, you need to use a rag with clear water to wash away the soap. Let it dry completely, then paint. I am not sure this would work on painted surfaces that were painted with really hard paint or some of the new plastic finishes - but it works for varnished wood and latex paint - at least for me. I learned this from a furniture refinisher.