Painting Experts: Help!

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Nette, Mar 16, 2004.

  1. Nette

    Nette Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm getting estimates for interior painting in an old house. (I could do it, but don't want to do it.) First estimate from a professional painting company was quite high, so I was going to see about getting estimates from local journeymen. The pro told me that since it was an old home, his intentions were to start with an oil-based primer, and then paint with a ______? Stupid, stupid me, I can't recall for sure what kind of paint he said he would use. Would he have said oil-based or latex? Wouldn't you need to put an oil-based paint on top of the oil-based primer?
     
  2. You can put Latex over most oil based primers,it was probably going to be a product called KILZ.Do you have a lot of problems with your wall?As far as stains or peeling cracking paint.Unless there is stains on your walls and woodwork there isnt really any reason to use an oil based primer.Why did he want to use it?Get another estimate.We usually prime with a latex primer ,usually only the woodwork(trim) then paint trim with oil based paint .Unless the walls have a lot of repair work we dont primw those,todays paints are much better than older type .Was the estimator an older guy.MY thoughts are get a few more bids,.Oh do you have walls that have had wallpaper removed,you have to prime those with KILZ to cover glue residue
     

  3. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

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    Unless it's exterior or high wear, like a floor, I see no reason to use oil-based anything. If it's applied properly, water-based works great, there are no bad fumes, and cleanup is a breeze. I'm on my second farmhouse rehab and I haven't needed anything but water-based products.
     
  4. Nette

    Nette Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've read that you shouldn't apply latex on top of oil-based, as it might become a peeling problem. This house was last painted, I'm guessing, in the 60's or 70's. I figured the reason the pro suggested an oil-based primer was because of the questionable origins of the present paint, and also to ensure good coverage of the top coat. Seems like to me that the oil-based primer would be the safest bet, but I just wondered would the top coat need to be oil-based, as well, or would it make a difference. I should add that the walls are sheetrock and appear to be in good shape. I really think it's flat latex paint on those, and probably oil-based gloss on the trim. The beautiful paneled doors have peeling paint, and I wish I could get them refinished. But for now, they'll just be painted. There are some water spots on the celetex ceiling that I want covered. (And FYI, I've already replaced the roof and I'm getting replacement windows next month.)
     
  5. DAVID In Wisconsin

    DAVID In Wisconsin Well-Known Member

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    They are right. Todays water based paints are more than good enough for most of todays's applications. Latex paint can be applied over oil-based. Especially over oil based that isn't freshly applied. Oil based primers are generally used when your walls have lots of stubborn stains that must be covered. Oil based primers tend to block out a bit better than water based. If your ceilings only have a few water stains and are otherwise in good shape, you don't have to paint them. You can put ordinary bleach in a misting bottle and LIGHTLY mist the stain. You might have to do this once a day for 2 or 3 days, depending on the stain. But, the water stain, unless it's major, will disappear. It's a lot cheaper than painting the ceiling.
     
  6. SueD

    SueD Well-Known Member

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    You can put a latex over just about anything. The reason for an oil-based primer is to prevent bleedthrough of darker colors, stains, etc. And, in an old house with the possibility of lead paint, this will usually meet standards for neutralizing/encapsulating it. No need for expensive testing if you just go ahead and do this in the first place... So would actually save you money in some minor degree.

    When I had my painting service (take into account this was in burbs of Chicago) my rate was: $25 an hour, customer supplied paint. Sometimes I would quote a job based on rooms, cause I'm pretty fast, lol. Then, for an average living room of 12 x 24 would be $300. Would also consider barter, though, which lots of folks liked - too much for comfort, lol!

    The price goes up the more woodwork and cutting in that's needed... In older homes, there can be a lot of decorative stuff which might require hand work.

    Everything round here is extra... If you want walls washed, same rate as painting. Spot cleaning $25 an hour. etc etc etc. If the job required scaffolding (cathedral ceilings etc) rate was $35 an hour (but I rented the scaffolds).

    I was also bonded for $1 million.... Would be a good idea to check. Covers not only theft, but also damage from accidents. Insurance is also expensive, any time you go into someone else's home, you are considered as a threat to that person - and their property - by the insurance companies, lol.

    I also requested homeowner help move really heavy furniture (usually no problem, I'm pretty small!).

    I had no lack of jobs.... even was hired by a couple gc's. Problem was wall paper. Don't mind hanging but HATE removing, lol!

    Sue
     
  7. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    For interior work, I agree that latex is the way to go. I would not agree on the exterior, however.
    I have been painting on the side for 8 years, and have never used oil based primer on anything except interior trim and exterior wood wook.
    clove
     
  8. Amy Jo

    Amy Jo Well-Known Member

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    Sue, what inspired you to develop a painting service.. A friend of mine from high school does this, but I've lost her address. What equipment did you find was the most efficient for paint application? And when you quoted a price did you assume it would be a one coat job or a two coat job?

    Most of my friends hate to paint - I love to. I don't know what a professional painter knows... but I'd like to...

    Any additional inside information?
     
  9. Jolly

    Jolly Well-Known Member

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    The safest way to go, is oil-based KILZ, with latex paint on top. This is what the pros use in this area.

    As for paint, ya just missed it. Sears had their Easy-Living brand for $7.98 gallon last week - and that's cheap for a 15 year paint!

    If paying regular price, I'm a Benjamin Moore, Devoe, and Sherwin Williams fan, in that order.
     
  10. Nette

    Nette Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks, Jolly & the rest of you guys. Jolly, do you think Kilz and ONE coat of the paint you recommended would do the job? I'm painting over light colors (mauve and mint green), with off-white walls and white trim.
     
  11. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    Remember the rule of thumb...

    1.It costs the same to paint a room, no matter what brand of paint you buy. Buy that crappy trash from Sears, and I guarantee that it will take at least two coats, or stop by a Sherwin Williams store, buy the interior Superpaint, and have great coverage with one coat. My sister just bought a 2600 s.f. house, didn't listen to me, and bought cheap paint. Took over 2 gallons to complete one bedroom; I bought the same color in Superpaint, and painted the 2nd bedroom in one coat. she now understands I was right, and that paying just $5 more for paint is better that having to buy another gallon. You get what you pay for in paint.

    2. You are going to pay in paint or labor....you pick. You will spend all day trying to spread cheap paint, but half the day if you use something good, like Superpaint.

    If I were you, I would tell the painters that you want Sherwin Williams Preprite latex primer, and Superpaint as your topcoat. You will be amazed at the results.

    clove
     
  12. Amy Jo

    Amy Jo Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for this information, as I'll be doing a lot of painting this year on our new house!

     
  13. tkrabec

    tkrabec Well-Known Member

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    I agree buy good paint.

    I paint my own stuff.

    I would use either a latex primer or a Oil based one. KIlz is good. If you are going with a color have the primer tinted it helps lots.

    I always put 2 coats of paint on the walls. If you do a good job trimming you can skip the second coat on the trim.

    I never spary the paint on always brush and roll.

    -- Tim
     
  14. Jolly

    Jolly Well-Known Member

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    I agree that cheap paint is bad - most of the time. But there are exceptions.

    In the case of the Sears paint, it normall sells for $16/gallon. If you lived around here, I'd be happy to show you 4 houses that I know of, where the interior paint has been there in excess of ten years.

    Secondly, a few years ago, Valspar made all of WalMart's interior paint. You could buy that stuff for $7/gallon all day long. You could buy the exterior stuff for $48/5 gallons. It was decent, not the best, but better than a lot of more expensive stuff.

    You don't always get what you pay for.

    For example, Lowes handles Olympic Paint. You can't run fast enough to give it to me.

    Lastly, to answer the question at hand - if painting a light color over a light color, a coat of primer, and a coat of paint will probably work. Check it over in good light, though, and make your own decision.
     
  15. Amy Jo

    Amy Jo Well-Known Member

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    I've used Olympic paint - it took quite a few coats... one coat of Kilz (which was probably too thin) and 3 or 4 coats of the Olympic. I still see shadows. I think I'm too afraid of that orange peely look when the paint is put on too thick. Or maybe the paint just sucks AND I'm too afraid of that orange peely look...

    Has anyone used one of those powered paint rollers? How have you like those? I'm thinking of getting one that has the flat edging tool too.
     
  16. Jolly

    Jolly Well-Known Member

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    On outside jobs, I use a spray rig. Very fast, and does a pretty good job, but you have to watch overspray pretty closely.

    For interior work I've tried the powered rollers, and I don't see enough difference between rolling by hand (5 gallon bucket, and roller), to bother with it.

    One of the best places I've found for painting advice through the years, is our local paint shops, which cater to the working trade. They are usually owned by people who know their stuff, and as long as you are doing a bit of business with them, will answer any, and as many, dumb questions that you have.

    Lord knows I've asked a bunch of them... :eek: