Painted Mountain Corn - dissapointment

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Paranoid, Apr 12, 2006.

  1. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

    Messages:
    602
    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2004
    Location:
    Z9
    Maybe this is good for montana and other northern climates, but for the south, this plant is dissapointing.

    The pros:
    fast growth
    high protein

    the cons:
    weak stalks (cant run beans up them)
    usually only 1 ear to a stalk
    small ears

    well, next year i will try another variety, this one was a bit of a dissapointment.
     
  2. kathy H

    kathy H kathyh

    Messages:
    393
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2002
    Location:
    California
    Try Rainbow Inca from seeds of change, good right off salk[ not cooked] and makes a great seed corn and holds beans no problem, have even had pumkins hanging off it.
     

  3. kathy H

    kathy H kathyh

    Messages:
    393
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2002
    Location:
    California
    Ok must be tired, should be great eaten fresh off stalk. And makes a great corn ground for flour.
     
  4. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

    Messages:
    602
    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2004
    Location:
    Z9
    my next corn will stress sturdiness and productiveness.

    gonna try to find one that boasts 2-3 large ears per stalk (hopefully more 3's than 2)

    gonna do some research.
     
  5. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,910
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2003
    Location:
    tn
    hm, it sounds like a dandy home garden corn. was it good to eat?

    try hickory king corn. it's what old timers used to grow beans on here. it's not a real good eating corn tho. it's better to make hominy.

    i think you will be disappointed trying to find a halfway decent corn that produces more than one ear. that one ear has a whole bunch of seeds on it, so the plant only has to produce that one to reproduce.

    what is your purpose in trying to grow beans that grow up the corn stalk? do you have limited space?
     
  6. Jaclynne

    Jaclynne Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    5,364
    Joined:
    May 14, 2002
    Location:
    N E Texas
    Might want to look into Bloody Butcher corn. It can be eaten fresh when young or makes a good corn meal when mature and has a history of use as feed. Here is a couple descriptions found when googled.......

    "Bloody Butcher
    120 days — This dent-type corn has been grown in the U.S. since 1845. The stalks are ten to twelve feet with two to six ears of corn per stalk. The kernels are striped red or dark red on pink to red cobs. An occasional white ear may appear. Can be used for roasting or frying when young but generally used for flour or corn meal. Good flavored. "


    "By Maureen Crockett
    For The Charleston Gazette

    In 1800, when Betsey Gibson was just 10 years old, she and her dog Wolf were captured by Indians.
    The half white, half Pottawatomie Indian child lived with the Indians for a year, absorbing their culture, before she escaped by swimming the Ohio River with Wolf — and some red seed corn her captors grew.
    Her descendants mixed the red corn seed with their own white settlers’ corn; the result is now known as bloody butcher corn. Over the years, the family knew cycles of wealth and poverty, but they always kept their special corn. During the Depression, the corn kept them going.
    Edgar Meadows, 83, told the history of the bloody butcher corn to his granddaughter, Julie Green, who wrote down the tale."
     
  7. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

    Messages:
    602
    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2004
    Location:
    Z9
    yeah i grow hickory king already, and do enjoy it fresh as well as dry.

    i have never seen a description of bloody butcher that claimed 6 ears per stalk, from what i have read it is 1-2
     
  8. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

    Messages:
    3,516
    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Location:
    AR (ozarks)
    I grew bloody butcher last year from seeds I got from SSE they were great. People in the area said they were the tallest corn they had seen large ears/sturdy stalks but usually one per.
     
  9. Shahbazin

    Shahbazin Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    395
    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2002
    Thanks for the story, HaloHead! I grow Bloody Butcher here in CA, & I really like it - vigorous, drought resistant, stands up to high winds, multiple (big) ears per stalk, tall sturdy stalks that I can train beans up - it's good fresh, for cornmeal, for animal feed, & it's a very attractive rich ruby color. Here's a harvest photo of some dried ears:
    [​IMG]

    And here's a small patch of it, along w/a big row of tomatoes:
    [​IMG]

    I don't actually dig up the ground, I just water the area in the pasture where it's going to go, poke some holes in the ground w/a stick, & plant it. After it comes up, I dump some bedding from the sheep & chicken pens around the hills to keep down weeds, & run a sprinkler on it every so often (it doesn't rain in the summer here). I do intensive mulch gardening w/my regular veggie garden, but my field crops (corn, squash, watermelons, tomatoes, beans) have to really want to grow :) .
     
  10. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

    Messages:
    602
    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2004
    Location:
    Z9
    well, i just pulled all my plants, some were rdy, some weren't, but all were just wasting space.

    i dug deep rows in between the squash rows, harvested the beans, the corn, and then dumped all the plants into the rows and covered with soil, then broadcasted amaranth over that, will be giving that a go next.

    hope there is enough time to get a second crop in, but more than likely there is.
     
  11. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

    Messages:
    28,248
    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Location:
    SE Missouri
    Thanks for sharing the experience with us. I was wondering if I should give painted mtn a try, now I will not waste the time and effort.