oxen training

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by mpillow, Jul 13, 2005.

  1. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Anyone have experience with this?

    I'd actually like to get a week old holstien calf (I'm floating in goat milk) and train, but I'm wondering if I absolutely have to have a pair....I'd rather have just one to feed.
    I'd really rather have a heifer but too much$$$$.
     
  2. lgslgs

    lgslgs Well-Known Member

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    We've just started baby ox training with our bottle calf (Shorthorn/Hereford cross). We're going with a single ox because most of the work we need to do isn't too heavy, and is usually along narrow paths. We didn't want to have to widen paths just to accomodate more ox power than we'll ever actually need.

    We get a lot of our information from Rural Heritage magazine, their web site, and the ox training video they sell through their site. A lot of it is about ox teams but there are folks who work a single ox. Draft horse/mule and goat info also often applies.

    Lynda
     

  3. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you srart two you can sell the one that doesn't work out or butcher it for beef.
     
  4. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    I'm working with a Jersey/Milking Devon cross and a pureblood Milking Devon. These guys are pretty quick to learn good and bad tricks, but mostly they aim to please. I thought to have them in a yoke already but was advised to give them more time in individual training, so maybe this fall we'll yoke them.

    I have a Jersey heifer trained to the commands and she will come in out of the paddock when her name is called. I don't know if I will ever work her at anything more than the commands, but she is a big girl and could do plenty if asked.
     
  5. shelbynteg

    shelbynteg Well-Known Member

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    How old are these now? And how long have you been working with them?
     
  6. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    Chuck, the Jersey/Milking Devon was born April 15, and Jack was born April 17; both this year.

    Jack is much smaller due to being born 6 weeks premature, but I weaned Chuck at 8 weeks while Jack is yet getting a gallon of milk a day. Both get about 3 pounds of 16% calf starter each day, and all of the hay they will eat. Jack is gaining on Chuck and maybe by this fall they will be close to the same size in height if not weight.

    I keep them tied up in the barn so that they don't learn they can run away, and so they will learn young that they can't get away if their tied.

    I began working with them right from the time they were born. First touching, then leading, then the commands.
     
  7. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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  8. .netDude

    .netDude Well-Known Member

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    heh heh... if you go to this site at work, make sure your speakers are turned down!
     
  9. Slev

    Slev Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've got a little Dexter heifer that I'm attempting to train to pull a small cart with. I also want to milk her when she's old enough. She's the only cow we have right now, but we do have other farm animals that she can be with and seems ok with that.

    According to what I've been reading, all training is based on YOUR needs. If you only want to train a single, then go for that. Holstein are listed as being some of the better temperment of cattle to work with, so good luck. (Dexter's are listed as a 9 out of a scale of 10, whereas Holsteins are a 1.)

    Good Luck