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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking at the possibility of picking up a IH 47 baler, but will it fit on a flatbed trailer? Does anyone have an idea how wide they are? I've searched the interwebs to no avail.
 

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width should be around 7-7.5 feet. I've seen several old square balers on flat bed trailers going down the road.
 

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I recall my 47 was 7 1/2 wide. Balers are difficult to get onto a trailer. You are going to want it on backwards. Hard to back up ramps straight enough. Loaded my JD24T with a loader on a tractor. Had to set the baler axle on the trailer's right side rail, let the tire hang over.
Despite my implement dealer telling me all 47 were crap, I continued to pour money into it. Very temperamental. Sold for scrap, along with $800 in knotter repair parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you. From what I am able to find, which is only online, that if the baler is running right, it works as well as any baler. The question is then just if this baler is worn out or still has some good left in it.
 

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Parts for antique or obsolete balers are costly. If the knotter discs are worn, replacement is the only option. Easy to get past a thousand dollars just on wear parts in the two knotters.
I have live power on my tractor's PTO, so changing gears shouldn't matter. But if I changed gears, up or down, my IH 47 would miss knotting on two bales. If I touched the clutch in any way, the baler knew it and dumped two untied bales. That was on the days it was running right.
But if you have lots of baler timing and knotting experience and money for parts, no reason you can't make some hay. I wish you the best of luck with yours
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Parts for antiques are expensive. But so is newer machinery and their parts. And buying hay isn't cheap. I picked up a pickup load of alfalfa bales today that averaged about 45-50 pounds. It was year-old hay, stored in a shed. And it really wasn't worth what I gave for it. Some of that was the quality of hay going into the baler. But the baler sure didn't like to make a heavy bale. It was a John Deere 346, which wasn't too old.

So what do you do? Sometimes you throw the dice and see what you get.
 

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The weight of a bale is mostly controlled by the adjustment springs on each side of the bale chamber near the chute. Light bales are the result of a person wanting to get full price for 3/4 of the hay.
 

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JD 14T and New Holland 69 and newer balers were the first ones to get the knotters right.

Other brands of that era had issues. Not so many sales, not so many parts around, not so many people experience working with them.....

Locally, a NH baler from the 1950s or 60s, parts are on the dealer shelf still.

With a pre 48 model IHC, you do have your work cut out for you, tempromental machines. ;)

Don't let us spoil the fun tho, gotta start farming some where, you will enjoy it. Mostly. ;)

Paul
 

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I pulled a nh 68 baler home years ago thru atlanta ga. It was a 200 mile road trip. The only thing I would have done different would be to replace the tires at the start. The small tire gave it up about 12 miles from home. Just saying this in case you decide to pull it. The 68 did have the hitch that would shift over. But I pulled an ac all crop 66 home 2 years ago and I made me an offset hitch for the back of my truck. The all crop hung out past my truck about 1.5 feet on each side. Just offering an idea.

Best of luck on ih baler. Uncle had an ih 55 way back when I was a kid. Was the only ih baler ever around here that I know of.

Bellcow
 

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I've done a lot of hauling. I ran an ad in Michigan Farmer and bought 4 Allis Chalmers 60 combines. I hauled each one 300 miles. I had a 2 wheel trailer that I could pull the axles out, shove the trailer under the combine and then jack the trailer up. The combine's weight is in the back, so instead of tongue weight, I had tongue lift. I do not recommend that. I had to get DOT oversize load permits each time.
I also hauled a self propelled combine from Canada, near Sarnia, 300 miles, on a good gooseneck trailer.

But the trip from [email protected]!! was getting my JD 24 baler. I didn't own a trailer, so borrowed one from a neighbor. I spent 8 hours welding cracks in the angle iron frame, hammering out the fenders and re-wiring the lights. I was ready for the 600 mile round trip.
I left at about 4am, Sunday morning, headed across the Upper Peninsula. Three hours later, a tire blew. Being Sunday, I couldn't get any tires, new or used. The guy that had the baler, also had a junk yard. I managed to get there on three wheels. He sold me a tire and mounted it. All he had to load the baler was a Ford 9N and the baler weighed as much as the tractor, lifting the hind tires.
I forget why, but he wanted me to unhook the trailer from my truck. To keep the trailer from moving, he chalked the tires with an old jack. The jack punched a hole in a tire. Then, in order for it to fit on the trailer, the baler had to rest with a tire hanging over the short side rail of the trailer. He replaced another tire. I headed home. When I stopped for gas in Marquette, I could hear a tire going flat. Walmart has a tire department. But they do not have jacks, they lift up the whole car. So, they couldn't take the tire off the trailer. Out in the parking lot, I jacked up the trailer and rolled the wheel to them. When I got home, my son had raked hay and it wasn't too late to bale. So we pulled the baler off and it wouldn't tie. Hooked up my old IH 47 and hand tied the bales the baler didn't. Long day.
 
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