Outdoor Wood Heater

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by idontno, Oct 21, 2005.

  1. idontno

    idontno Well-Known Member

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    I have read a lot about outdoor boilers.They don't sound to good.I want to build a outdoor wood stove.Small concrete building(insulated good)with a good homebuilt stove in it.It would have to be fairly air tight to keep out the smell. Then have a in and out duct from the tomb.Tap it into a large room through the wall of my house.Have the return from a cool room in the house or at the fartherest room from outlet.Anyone done it?I know the duct lines will have to be insulated ,but that a small problem.I know I can fire a stove better that way.Wouldn't have near the smoke and it would burn a lot cleaner.Thanks and plz give me you comments and suggestions.idontno
     
  2. idontno

    idontno Well-Known Member

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    Here is the only one that I can find that might be close to what I want to build.But I think I would locate it farther away and have a better stack on it. http://www.outsidewoodheater.com/
     

  3. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    I had the same idea. Still, after two years of thinking about the idea, cannot figure out why it would not work.
    I think the hardest part would be figuring out what size fan would be needed to pull enough hot air into the house.
    clove
     
  4. bretthunting

    bretthunting Well-Known Member

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    i was woundering if an old squirl cage type fan from a swamp cooler might be able to be used
     
  5. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    With onen air ducts between the buildings & a fan pushing, might your insurance co still consider this part of the house & not approve of such? Just something to consider.

    It is much easier to move heat (BTUs) in a dense liquid than with air. If you are going a long distance, another thing to consider. Insulating 2 pipes is cheaper than 2 large tunnels.

    --->Paul
     
  6. canfossi

    canfossi Well-Known Member

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    It sounds like it might work and be a lot cheaper.
     
  7. Arborethic

    Arborethic Well-Known Member

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    I once built a cordwood house that had a large rock bin beneath the slab. I ducted well filtered air from the electric dryer and the wood stove into this bin to store excess heat and release it gradually over a longer period of time. I had about ten tons of 'headsized' rocks stacked in the bin, to provide a good air flow. This almost eliminated the risk of fire (just had to do normal maintenance on the wood stove chimney). The slab would stay nice and warm for days. But there was no direct flow of air into the living space.

    The problem with any kind of air ducting is variable heat and humidity. You can grow some real nasty molds and mildews in such ducts. Even if you aren't sensitive to them, they stink! LOL...

    I'd strongly suggest using a liquid to transfer heat, as Rambler suggested. The technology is simple. Basically it isn't any different than the cooling/heat exchange system on a car engine. Imagine the car engine as the wood stove, and the radiator as your indoor heat source.

    These folks produce a commercial model, which provides heat to your home, along with hot water. Study their method and I bet you can put together a much cheaper system that works just as well. http://www.centralboiler.com/home.html

    A boiler does NOT have to operate under a great deal of pressure. Two or three pounds of pressure can be more than adequate. That's well below explosive pressure. A hot water heater pressure relief valve, or a pair installed in the line, will totally reduce the threat of any explosive force building up.

    If you have your home's heat exchanger located well above that of the 'boiler', then you don't even need a pump. Simple convection will move the heat bearing liquid.

    Another manufacturer: http://www.mainewooddoctor.com/index.php

    Alas, I'm too old to take on such a project, so I'm probably going to buy the commercial unit. I produce enough firewood as a by product of work to heat a dozen homes.

    These folks market a nonpressurized system. You might pick up some tips from their website: http://www.wdheat.com/2004-site/best-stove.html
     
  8. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    We looked at a bunch of models at a recent fair (common Grounds Fair in Unity Maine). They all used water to bring the heat into your house.

    My goodness they are expensive.

    I would think about making a concrete-block two-chambered furnace inside of a small shack. The second chamber would lead to a chimney, would be where i would hang coils to heat the water in, AND I would puts lots of hooks for hanging meat. Then the one structure would be used for both heating through the winter, and smoking meat.
    :goodjob:
     
  9. TnAndy

    TnAndy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Do an internet search for HASA or mybe it's HAHSA......acronym for a home built heating system.

    To describe it:

    Basically, you build a block building, like 8x10 or so, and insulate the inside of the block walls with a couple inches of foam....then fill the building full of sand. As you fill, you also build a large firebox of firebrick in the center, and run a web of copper pipe in the sand. If I were gonna do it, I'd use something like 3/4 roll type copper ( type L or K ) to minimize the number of joints to deal with....and probably silver solder them to boot....

    The firebox is accessed from one end of the building....and you build the roof out over than end so you don't stand in the rain to feed the firebox......regular flue tile was used out of the box, and up thru the sand fill and out the roof.

    To use it, you burn ANYTHING ( like get on ever junk mail list you can...ahahahahaa ) in the firebox with plenty of air.....the idea is to burn it HOT and capture the heat in the sand bulk......then pipe water from the house to the sand heat sink, and move the warmed water back to the house, run either thru infloor tubing for heating or a heat exchanger in an air duct. My understanding is you fired it once a day and crammed everything in the firebox you could.....I guess that would vary with climate and firebox size.



    ET1: I think you'll find a "multipurpose" deal like that won't work all that well.....the temp you want for heating is way more than the temp you want for smoking meat....meat smoking is mostly a 'cool' smoking process.
     
  10. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    Sounds good.



    Looking at so many commercial units, they mostly have large smoke chambers. Claiming that hot gasses still give-off a lot of heat.

    Anyway, I was not thinking of heating the house and smoking meat at the same time.

    Smoking is done cool, and with lots of smoke and 'select' woods.

    A single structure built to do both jobs (at seperate times) could be handy.

    thanks.

    :walk: