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Lots of questions, I have few answers.

Yes, you can overfeed sunflower seeds, IMO. Every time my rabbits got too many seeds they got gooey poops all over the cages.

I always feed kits and nursing does all the pellets they wanted. Along with the hay (grass hay, usually timothy because that is available) they should be getting enough food.

You can give them whole oats as a supplement. I wouldn't give them a whole bunch, maybe a teaspoon or two mixed with the sunflower seeds. Oats was one of the standard feed grains before pelleted food was common.

 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Thanks Danaus. I really appreciate your thoughts.

I'm sitting here thinking how we did our rabbits 25 years ago. Things really haven't changed or I guess we figured it out. But it's nice to hear from folks with lots more experience. BTW that's a great site that you had an attachment to.
Best part about getting things tuned in is making everything easier n more efficient.
So I looked out to check on our rabbits this morning. There's an almost black bunny sitting outside of our pens. I'm thinking maybe it's one of ours n go check. Our were fine. Guess we have a stragler. I found a black baby kit a few days ago so its probably a female. I was trying to figure out how snow shoe hares kits could be black with hair.
I really dislike it when folks release rabbits. I'm going to have to deal with it now.
 

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Not sure about over feeding sunflower seeds but we always offered pellets constantly via a feeder and greens (hay, grass, privet hedge and clover) at least once a day. The kits nibbled greens from 4-6 weeks and we never had an issue. Mine were raised in a colony, but that shouldn’t matter.
 

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I did a lot of research into various feeds when we first got rabbits. I thought about breeding them to eat but ate a rabbit Mom cooked (could have been Mom's cooking, she isn't the best cook) and decided I wasn't going to eat a lot of rabbit. I bred a few litters for pet or breeding stock sales and decided that wasn't going to pay for the feed. I still have a few that their previous owners didn't want but no longer breed rabbits. The current group get a handful of oats every day in cold weather and pumpkin seeds if I can find those. But they don't get sunflower seeds because of the poops.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
So this morning I'm laying bed n our chessy starts barking aggressively. Attack mode. I run out n the neighbors French melamine is attacking our rabbits. I and our daughter are between the rabbits and an attack dog in full on attack mode lunging 2-3 feet away. I'm probably in just as high attack mode by now.
This dog would not quit. Running around us to duck under the canopy walls biting n jumping at the pens.
Finally the neighbor shows up. The dog still will not release from attack mode. After several minutes he finally gains control of his dog.
The worst part was him saying over n over about how his dog would never hurt anything or anyone.
I assured him that if our fence hadn't been strong enough to hold back our Chesapeake Bay Retriever, bred to protect their turf. There would have been serious injuries to the dogs. But I suspect he would have a dead dog.
I'm just trying to feed our family, and dealing with others problems comes with it i guess.
I do hope he finds a proper fix. There great neighbors.
 

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Predators lunging at the cages can cause rabbits to have a heart attack.

I'm glad the neighbor was able to gain control of his dog. I hope the dog doesn't come back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Hello all. Update on our rabbitry. Our does are having their second litter. The friers are growing fast. All have been healthy.
We ground up a bunch of the manure from over winter. Great garden compost.
I built this 30"×8' pen. I also have our old grow out pen so I will separate them into 2 groups of 12. To reduce feeding stress for the smaller kits. And more room for each kit to move around more.
This has been a some work getting to this point but it's getting easier every day as we progress towards being more efficient and finding ways to cut costs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I was able to get an old grow out pen resurrected n split the group to 12 each. 12 n 11 actually, one is running loose, little bugger. Giving them more room per rabbit n reducing feeding pressure
 
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