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I'd measure all pieces of the tree to get it's total length , then measure the horizontial distance from the stump to a point directly under the closest power line ! you'll have to ask for the height of the powerline......A squared x B squared = C squared ! Asquared= height of powerline , Bsquared=horizontial distance from tree trunk to point on ground directly under powerline , and Csquared is the distance from powerline down to tree trunk ! This will tell you IF the tree would have hit the powerline had it fallen . , fordy
 

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Otiose Endomorph
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Heyman , that guy looks exactly like .........SpeedY Gonzalez Gonzalez ! , fordy
Haha, I misread your post, I thought you were talking about their job...it does look like a speedy Gonzalez job...they dropped the tree on your driveway, then bucked it up so they could clear your driveway, which in turn ruined the log (unless your just looking for firewood).
The fact they didn't buck it up as they descended down tree, tells me it wasn't a powerline issue. All arbourists in our hood felling a tree near a house or PL will scale tree, limb on way up and buck on the way down (small chunks). Rarely, do they pull out tackle, as they have to climb tree anyways...
They felled the tree in one whoop, then bucked it up so they could clear your driveway (can see sawdust piles on driveway).
 

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Discussion Starter #24
The tree company has agreed to pay me the $200 I asked for. Again, I didn't know how to establish a value for a downed tree but I'm satisfied with the amount agreed upon. Plus I still have half the tree and several large rounds which will certainly be used in the future.

I also asked them to notify me prior to any future work, which they agreed to.
 

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Thanks for the update! Good to hear they responded quickly and compensated you.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I haven't posted on our build thread over the last few months because we haven't done much. Earlier in the year we were hampered with excessive rain and then for the last few months its been excessive heat. These extremes sure have slowed us down a bit. I think the only noteworthy thing we did was buy a wood splitter and split a lot of fire wood.

But that's all about to change. After a lot of discussion between my wife and I we have decided to hire a company to clear about half the land. Now when I say clear, we're only talking trees 6" wide or less and all the undergrowth. Since the property is raw and has never been worked on it's simply too much for us to tackle. Plus half of the area to be cleared is on a hill that will require hand clearing.



We've met with a few companies and decided on one yesterday. He'll bring in a crew of 6 and have the job completed in 4-days. They will chip some wood and make piles for burning on the hill side that they come back in the winter to burn. He'll be doing a little excavation work in filling in some holes left from our perc and mantel test and leveling out the top a bit so they have a large work area. It's going to run us $12,000 to do this. The general consensus between my wife and I as well as friends who have seen the property is it is a reasonable price. And I think that's how we have to look at it. Is it cheap, hell no, but what's it worth to have it all done in a week. For that and the amount of work required we feel it's worth it.

Plus clearing the land is going to give us the ability to start reading the contours of the land and zeroing in on a build site. Right now it is so dense you can't see more that 50' so being able to open things up will be nice. I'm going to be up there for the last couple of days to make sure everything is getting done as agreed.

I'll shoot some before and after video as we go to show what they did. It's a pretty big expense and leap of faith but if it comes out like we expect we'll be happy.
 

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Howdy neighbor!

We're in the Sierra foothills also, at 2k elevation, but we have an existing house. I'm thinking we're south of you based on terrain. Course we purchased a house versus raw land, super cool, gonna be an awesome project!
 

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We had some pge contractors come on our land without notifying, even though I've told them time and time again they need to call. Dummies had a hard time turning around, we're pretty steep and not a lot of driveway, ran over a pot of mine... I was pretty pissed. Got a padlock on the gate now. They come out so often, they've got one company for the trees, one for the poles, one for the wires, each one coming out 3x per year. Very annoying.

And we were close enough to the mariposa fire to get some drift smoke. Pretty scary. But that's the price you pay to live in paradise, I guess.
 

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I haven't posted on our build thread over the last few months because we haven't done much. Earlier in the year we were hampered with excessive rain and then for the last few months its been excessive heat. These extremes sure have slowed us down a bit. I think the only noteworthy thing we did was buy a wood splitter and split a lot of fire wood.

But that's all about to change. After a lot of discussion between my wife and I we have decided to hire a company to clear about half the land. Now when I say clear, we're only talking trees 6" wide or less and all the undergrowth. Since the property is raw and has never been worked on it's simply too much for us to tackle. Plus half of the area to be cleared is on a hill that will require hand clearing.



We've met with a few companies and decided on one yesterday. He'll bring in a crew of 6 and have the job completed in 4-days. They will chip some wood and make piles for burning on the hill side that they come back in the winter to burn. He'll be doing a little excavation work in filling in some holes left from our perc and mantel test and leveling out the top a bit so they have a large work area. It's going to run us $12,000 to do this. The general consensus between my wife and I as well as friends who have seen the property is it is a reasonable price. And I think that's how we have to look at it. Is it cheap, hell no, but what's it worth to have it all done in a week. For that and the amount of work required we feel it's worth it.

Plus clearing the land is going to give us the ability to start reading the contours of the land and zeroing in on a build site. Right now it is so dense you can't see more that 50' so being able to open things up will be nice. I'm going to be up there for the last couple of days to make sure everything is getting done as agreed.

I'll shoot some before and after video as we go to show what they did. It's a pretty big expense and leap of faith but if it comes out like we expect we'll be happy.
So glad to hear from you Hitch!
Yep, you have a sweet looking property...
Looking forward to pics/vid.
Yeah, we had the same odd year, in terms of weather...nasty winter, then heat and smoke all summer...smoke is gone, thankfully (our province broke the record for most forest burnt...and summer isn't over yet).

Hope the crew works out for you. Best.
 

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Was the tree within their utility easement? If not then the usual is triple stumpage.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Today was an exciting day, the land clearing is done! And man what a difference it made.

First off, our useable space grew exponentially. We have a huge field we knew was there but could never see it. Perhaps the most drastic discovery was seeing the contours of the hillside. I knew it had a slight curve leading down to the creek, but it is really a much more drastic curve. It really gave me a great view of the property.

The guys worked their tails off and going up and down that hill all day must have been a bltch on their knees. I'll have 60+ burn piles to contend with come winter but at least they're covered.

Here are some general pics and some before and after shots. These two are at the top of the property.





Our swing looking down to the creek, which we could never see only hear. Now we can see it.







But perhaps the best part was the transformation to the creek. We could really only access one corner of it because the undergrowth was too thick to traverse along the shore. There are a few burn piles down there now, but otherwise everything has been removed and we can now walk to the other end.





We also had a visitor the other night. I asked my wife, we didn't leave in food in there did we. She looked sheepishly and said I think we left the salt and pepper up there last time. So we'll need to make sure we're scent free on our next trip up.



 

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Otiose Endomorph
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Awesome Hitch! Looks like a park! Your own park...
And being able to see a distance is always nice, especially with big furry blobs rooting around...;)
Well, if Mr/Mrs Bear didn't get anything, you should be ok going forward. It is when they find something, they become pests real quick. Long ago, I had a bear print on my electrical shed door (garbage storage - perennially cool building). Given a few have become adept at opening lever doors, we've had them rummaging through houses and cars (one even tried my RV while I was in it, then tried my car door). But, I have deadbolt on door, and I haven't had any prints since.
Real nice looking job. I thought you were getting an excavating job, not a labor job.
Wonder what the thinking is on covering the piles...while it does rain a wee bit up here, keeping the pile open, so air and sun can dry it out (season it), seems to work. After about 6mths - 1yr, my piles (machine piles) are ripe for a burning.

Stunning looking piece of property.
 

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Clearing out some trees sure made a world of difference. Love the view of the creek from the swing. I think that would be my favorite spot on the property. Nice place to start or end the day with a beverage just watching the water flow by. Beautiful piece of land.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Another forest fire (Cascade) nearby has broken out. This is the 4th one this year. We knew forest fires were a risk in the area, but not this bad. It’s grown from 8 miles away yesterday to 2 miles away today.

We were up at the property over the weekend. On Sunday, we decided to stay a few extra hours because it was so beautiful and peaceful. Eventually we headed down the hill with the windows down enjoying the fall day.

A day later it’s a war zone up there. Houses we drove by a day earlier were smoldering piles of rubble on Monday. So sad to see so many homes destroyed, pets and livestock killed and lives disrupted.

I’m really hoping we didn’t make a mistake buying in the foothills.
 

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Another forest fire (Cascade) nearby has broken out. This is the 4th one this year. We knew forest fires were a risk in the area, but not this bad. It’s grown from 8 miles away yesterday to 2 miles away today.

We were up at the property over the weekend. On Sunday, we decided to stay a few extra hours because it was so beautiful and peaceful. Eventually we headed down the hill with the windows down enjoying the fall day.

A day later it’s a war zone up there. Houses we drove by a day earlier were smoldering piles of rubble on Monday. So sad to see so many homes destroyed, pets and livestock killed and lives disrupted.

I’m really hoping we didn’t make a mistake buying in the foothills.
I hear it is real bad there right now. Hopefully, they can get it under control or some rain/cooler weather prevails...we have entered the fall unscathed on coast, but interior here got hammered (worst ever on record).
Hoping you have a forest to go back too. Not a lot one can do with Mother Nature. I hear the real kicker is you folks get some nasty winds which is what makes California deadly during the dry season.
I've seen forest damage in our hood, and 'sometimes' they move so fast they only char the bark, and the trees survive. Within a few years, you wouldn't know there was a fire (other than scorched bark). It is the fires that have lots of understory fuel (forest litter) that kills the trees. And the types of trees make a difference. Some are burners, while others can handle a fire.

I'm cladding my house in fireproof material...lol...plus I have a decent fire break around it. And I will be installing fire suppression.
 

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Another forest fire (Cascade) nearby has broken out. This is the 4th one this year. We knew forest fires were a risk in the area, but not this bad. It’s grown from 8 miles away yesterday to 2 miles away today.

We were up at the property over the weekend. On Sunday, we decided to stay a few extra hours because it was so beautiful and peaceful. Eventually we headed down the hill with the windows down enjoying the fall day.

A day later it’s a war zone up there. Houses we drove by a day earlier were smoldering piles of rubble on Monday. So sad to see so many homes destroyed, pets and livestock killed and lives disrupted.

I’m really hoping we didn’t make a mistake buying in the foothills.

That is one reason we have cut down any trees within falling distance of our homes in our little forested land. Then keep the grass cut low and pray there is never a fire. Some kids set a couple of mattresses on fire down the road against a tree during a very dry spell. Its a miracle the fire did not spread. Its all forest between there and our home sites.

I would definitely consider building with a metal roof and some sort of fire resistant siding. Then maybe aluminum clad windows. Cut anything that can burn down all around your house site.

Seems like there are more and more fires out there every year. Be safe up there.

terry
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Spring has sprung...or at least I hope. We haven't done much to the property over the winter. I went up one night and camped otherwise it's been some day trips here and there. We got the burning all done a couple months ago, so that's a relief.

My son and I move the swing to a new location and used a 4x4 beam for a little more support. Seems to be a lot sturdier then my initial attempt. It's so nice to see the whole creek from the hill top. The sound of the creek is so mesmerizing.



We also bought a port-a-potty for a better restroom solution then our bucket system. We'll set that up on tax day...appropriately enough.

I'm going to be putting in a horseshoe pit in a couple of weeks too. In fact, I bought all the supplies today. We're trying to make the property more usable for recreation purposes right now.

Work wise I've got some old rusty barb-wire down off the creek I need to remove. I thought I got it all a couple months ago but after the burning more was found. I also need to figure out what to do with all the logs that didn't get burned all the way through.

Would it be bad to toss them in the creek to work their way down stream? None are longer then a few feet and under 6" round. I'd probably just do a little at a time to avoid any blockades.
 

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Spring has sprung...or at least I hope. We haven't done much to the property over the winter. I went up one night and camped otherwise it's been some day trips here and there. We got the burning all done a couple months ago, so that's a relief.

My son and I move the swing to a new location and used a 4x4 beam for a little more support. Seems to be a lot sturdier then my initial attempt. It's so nice to see the whole creek from the hill top. The sound of the creek is so mesmerizing.



We also bought a port-a-potty for a better restroom solution then our bucket system. We'll set that up on tax day...appropriately enough.

I'm going to be putting in a horseshoe pit in a couple of weeks too. In fact, I bought all the supplies today. We're trying to make the property more usable for recreation purposes right now.

Work wise I've got some old rusty barb-wire down off the creek I need to remove. I thought I got it all a couple months ago but after the burning more was found. I also need to figure out what to do with all the logs that didn't get burned all the way through.

Would it be bad to toss them in the creek to work their way down stream? None are longer then a few feet and under 6" round. I'd probably just do a little at a time to avoid any blockades.
Might want to do something besides dumping partially burned logs into the creek. Remember, wood ash mixed with water is used to make lye. Putting partially burned logs to float and soak in a creek could cause the same phenomenon in a less concentrated form and may be bad for the ecosystem. Any way you go about disposing of them, aside from burying them and letting them decay, results in releasing carbon and other pollutants into the air or water. Might be a better solution to burn the rest of them in a fire pit and enjoy a crackling fire some evenings.
 
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