Our Neighbors and 45,000 Turkeys

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Obser, Apr 12, 2006.

  1. Obser

    Obser "Mobile Homesteaders"

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    We just pulled back in from picking up a two or three year supply of fertilizer for our garden – from a turkey-raising operation about two miles away where 45,000 birds are raised at a time.

    We met the nice young couple that own and operate the place and suggested visiting them again when they weren’t so busy because they seem like such nice folks. I’d say that they are fine people to have as neighbors as long as we don’t live too close together.

    He took time out of a very busy schedule (getting their six massive houses ready for the next batch of birds) to chat for a few minutes and to put a load of manure on our pickup. He, of course, declined an offer of payment.

    Those who have been “up close and personal” with a chicken or turkey operation know what we mean when we advise staying upwind. Heck, we’re staying upwind from our truck now!

    I say all this to verify that IF some of us wind up buying SEPARATE parts of a large landholding, we might want all the deeds to have some restriction against specific types of agriculture that would be inconsistent with a homesteading neighborhood. I have no idea what should be specified or how it should be worded, but the subject can be discussed and when and if the time comes an attorney can help with the wording.

    Of course, such deed restrictions can apply ONLY to the land being purchased. They cannot be made to apply to any adjoining or nearby lands.

    Now, I must go take shovel in hand.
     
  2. mihal

    mihal Peterfi Mihal

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    An alternative is to have some zoning where the smelly operations go together and according to prevailing winds. In antiquity, saurkraut vendors had their own special section of the marketplace for just this reason.
     

  3. Firethorn

    Firethorn Well-Known Member

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    I was just thinking the same thing Mihal. A well run, turkey farm, pig farm, ETC will keep us all well fed.
     
  4. Obser

    Obser "Mobile Homesteaders"

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    For those who might wonder how and why “Mobile Homesteaders” could be involved in gardening:

    We have our Home on Wheels parked at the homestead belonging to GoatLady in northern Arkansas. We have been here going on two weeks and have become good friends with GL (a knowledgeable and interesting person and long-term homesteader).

    Wonderful Wife loves to garden and just beams when she can have her hands in the soil and can nurture the plants. I am allowed to help with some of the basics, but actually specialize in consuming the product.

    When GL worked in her raised beds, WW’s longing to be doing some gardening was more than obvious. We now have one raised bed filled with plants and are considering adding another.

    We may have to be gone for a while this summer helping a long-term friend in northern Indiana – which might have presented a problem except that GL offered to tend the beds while we are gone. I can insure that we are back in time to consume the product (at least part of it).

    GL has also been coaching WW and me in the fine art of canning foods. We bought twenty pounds of chicken leg quarters on special for 39 cents a pound, de-boned the meat and canned seven quarts of chicken and broth. We look forward to canning a lot of the production of the second raised bed.

    It is amazing how much can be done in a limited area using raised beds. The book, “Square Foot Gardening”, by Mel Bartholomew is a rich source of information.

    NOW, I go shovel (unless I think of something else). Maybe I'll go look for the saurkraut vendors because I love raw saurkraut.
     
  5. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

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    Funny how folks who object to smelly turkeys wouldn't "dream" of having anything else on their table at Thanksgiving. The point being, in order to have the nice things that we want, sometimes we have to deal with things that aren't so nice. By putting restrictions on land you prevent other people from choosing turkey and chicken farming as their way of making an income. Do you really think you have the right to do this, just for your own "convenience"? I don't. You might think that raising chickens or turkeys commercially is not consistent with a homesteading neighborhood, but I think that restricting peoples rights to make a living is inconsistent with the homesteading philosophy. If people want to raise chickens, turkeys or pigs for that matter, nobody should have the right to say they can't.

    Smelly or not.

    donsgal
     
  6. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Ask your neighbors thye use a growth enhancer to their turkey feed. If they add Roxarsone to the feed, you might want to reconsider using the litter. Roxarsone is an organic arsenic compound.
     
  7. slowsuki1

    slowsuki1 Well-Known Member

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    might sound crazy to some, but if you live near or around stock yards slater houses and such you get use to it, in a relitive fast time.had firends with feed yards across form there place at first i could not stand the smell, but two weeks later no smell.its like people who do not shower or use deoderent they can not smell anything wrong.have you ever been to old peoples houses that smell, they can not smell anything. noise is the same way. people that live near those tipes of playses will always, because it is familuare to them.the mind works in wierd ways does it not. kind of makes you wonder about things.
     
  8. Firethorn

    Firethorn Well-Known Member

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    Might keep away the city urbabites. :sing:
     
  9. Obser

    Obser "Mobile Homesteaders"

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    I agree that humans can adapt to nearly anything; however, there are things to which we might choose to not adapt. I was raised “under” the end of a military base runway. When people visiting us asked how we tolerated the noise we’d say, “what noise?”. But, I would not deliberately choose an airport as a neighbor (and am amazed that people move next to an existing airport then ask for laws enforcing noise abatement even when that causes increased cost and decreased safety in aircraft operation – and that politicians actually pass such laws).

    This is not to say that I desire to become accustomed to the odor benefits available downwind of our new friends’ turkey operation. If the land next to them was for sale, we would probably pass. Would you jump on it?

    In a similar vein, most folks who eat beef, pork, turkey, chicken, etc are probably not inclined to participate in butchering of the animals (and doing so might convert some to vegetarianism). WW and I will be helping with a hog butchering at nearby homesteaders’ place this coming weekend.
     
  10. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    I dont want my ground water that we will be drinking or the creek we will be swimming in polluted by a near by, or up creek large factory farm operation if it can be helped.
     
  11. Obser

    Obser "Mobile Homesteaders"

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    Thanks for the tip Cabin Fever
     
  12. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    Believe me if we Pagans/ Homosexuals/all others/ tolerant Christians can get it together and buy the Yellville property we will have plenty of these types of operation in the vicinity of our homesteads to get manure from, My family will be raising their own pigs/cows/poultry gardens Organically and free range (at least not in small cages or pens or crowded conditions you know what I mean) (and will have a small excess to sell) we wont need or want to buy from factory farms.
     
  13. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    I love saurkraut too. I got that book in the mail a few weeks ago off www.alibris.com and when I finish reading Carla emory's book I am going to read it.
     
  14. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    He is talking about limiting people from making numerous barns filled with 45 thoasand birds each. I think that no one would have a problem with someone who raised 5 thoasand birds or even 10,000. or 100 pigs we are talking about something else entirely, I would not even call it farming.
     
  15. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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  16. slowsuki1

    slowsuki1 Well-Known Member

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    that is somethig to be conserned with for shure but the stuff they spray on filds is probubly worse. the ground can only filter so much.the rest we drink in our water.not a good thought
     
  17. Obser

    Obser "Mobile Homesteaders"

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    Jnap,
    I know two people very well who would not choose to be adjacent to thousands of hogs or birds. WW and I have been around around such environments and would decidedly NOT choose to locate nearby.

    I have no idea how one might protect the environment and the "pursuit of happiness" for all concerned. Even if purchased property is deed restricted, those restrictions "stop at the property line" and owners of adjacent or nearby tracts of land outside what was purchased by homesteaders are not bound by them in any way.

    That said, most of us presently have little influence or control of the uses of adjacent land and, aside from a few horror stories, problems don't seem overpowering.
     
  18. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    It is simple to make sure you don't end up next door to a stinky turkey farm...you check zonings before you buy. I checked all over, went to 2 town offices, investigating who could do what where before I bought my 10 acres. No, I can't start a goat farm, but I live in a good, quiet neighborhood. Simple.
    It's like the people up here who buy a cheaper house then complain because the cars fly down their street doing 60. Why do you think that house was cheap? Or move to a trailer park then complain about noise...
     
  19. Obser

    Obser "Mobile Homesteaders"

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    Sullen, WHAT zoning?

    Rural areas of many states do not have nor want zoning laws. It is not wise to tell the rural people of Texas, Arkansas or Oklahoma (for example) that they "need" zoning laws.

    Zoning may be appropriate for those who fear ______________ (fill in the blank), but the rural folk in these parts "ain't afraid" and don't want "city slickers" telling them what they should do with their land. They seem to be a lot more content and happy than folks from highly regulated areas.

    I sure wouldn't want to be the one to tell them that they are all wrong.
     
  20. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    Oh I am sorry, I live on the east coast where everything is zoned.