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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This new thread is all about our feeding program. Not everyone will be able to duplicate it as it is totally dependent on utilizing waste from guineas, pheasants and quail. No pig feed will be bought or used. Our goal is to grow pigs without costs to us as we already have high costs in our birds. We realize that many will think our feeding program will harm the pigs, us or anyone who buys our pigs. We believe it will not.

OK enough disclaimer time.

How we feed our pigs.
1. Twice daily
2. Bird waste in winter is collected weekly by hand gathering poop and sorting waste feed, and alfalfa hay chaff (fines) except for quail which is poop picked daily. Summer pens are cleaned every 2 weeks using same method.
3. Watering as needed
4. Grazed in spring, summer and fall too cold and grass stops growing.

Received 4 gilts and 2 boars November 14th average weight 25lbs. November 18th added 1 boar at 25lbs from a different farm. Planning on breeding 2 gilts and butchering the other 2 gilts and the 2 boars.

As we butcher the pigs we will be weighing and checking fat content and noting time it took to get to our butcher size.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Was talking to my wife on the into Spokane. The conversation was about what is the percentage of what in our waste feed. Well, best we can calculate is as follows.
Pheasants or guinea waste

10 to 15% North40 bird seed or Fred Meyer bird seed.
5% Purina 30% gamebird feed
30% fine alfalfa hay chaff
10 to 15% bird poop
The rest is alfalfa hay stems

Quail waste
50% quail poop could be higher
30% gamebird feed 30%
The rest is pine shavings
Quail can't be raised with stem of anything. It gets in their gizzard and pokes a hole thru the gizzard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This morning I fed the pigs kitchen stuff the pigs ate it very quickly. Before they finished I fed them guinea waste and they didn't finish the kitchen stuff and went for the guinea waste. Before they finished that I chopped up a apple and thru that in. The apple won over all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Feeding program work great so far. Tomorrow morning going to add bird waste to pen to help keep them warmer. Good thing my wife cleaned the guinea pens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My wife was looking at the pigs yesterday afternoon and informed me to cut the feed program back some. She says the pigs look too fat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Butchered one of the larger pigs today. Pigs bought 15 November and we butchered one 11 days later on the 26th.
Gilt
Pig weight live - 40lbs
Hanging - 13lbs
Back fat - about 3/8 inch
Growth rate - over 1lb per day
Our results is a more or less
We are very pleased with these results considering we bought 6 of them for $33.33 and have no feed cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Gave half of the butchered pig to our daughter. The other half found its way to the grill on this beautiful day. Nothing better then fresh pork.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow, found some left over small pumpkins in the garden that didn't look moldy or too bad. There were two small ones. The pigs looked like piranhas as they ate. They sure have a liking for sweets.

Been slowly adding more waste feed that has more hay in it. Just to deepen their bedding without over feeding. The reason for this is it is going to get colder and we want the pigs to continue to gain weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So, scraps from the kitchen, the things they will eat.
Persimmon skins, green onion roots, ginger skin, quail egg shells, bean sprout hauls and bad stems, mackerel fish fins and tail chopped small. Just trying to list things you generally don't see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Did a comparison feeding of lettuce, napa cabbage, apple and our feed program.
1st put the lettuce cabbage in, they went for it. But, before finishing I put our bird scrap feed. So much for lettuce and cabbage they went for the feed. Then before finishing that I put apple pieces in. That topped everything and they went for the apples then back to the feed and finishing up with lettuce cabbage mix.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Don't know, our 7 Kunes average around 40 plus pounds. We just got them last month. They look great. There is one that was the runt of the litter. We plan to butcher it this spring. So I'll update performance as we butcher them. This breed of pig is difficult for me to judge weight as I grew up around normal closed confinement pigs.
 

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I am doing something similar keeping our pigs with cows. they eat the manure and hay and also rabbit manure when we kept them in the barn. Fed 3 50-100 lb kunes and one 100 lb mulefoot for free except scratch grain we'd throw down to distact them while I milked. We also didn't feed our flock of 20 chickens who live in the barn, they scavenged just fine with all that manure around. Feeding grain now cuz of the cold, but looking forward to working on our feeding program this spring. Cohabiting animals is a great money saver and also had an old timey feel!

Fyi I finished one kune born June 2020 in November of this year. I finished him entirely on pasture plus food bank scraps all summer til about august, then strictly milk and apples on pasture. He was still too fat lol. Finished at 180 lbs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
We have learned these are a very fatty pig. Great to see someone else out there not afraid to feed differently. I have another post where we scored 2 kunekune 150 to 180lb pigs for free. And yes they are a very fatty pig. But in that post I give the boneless weights of the meat yield. We where very impressed. Matter of fact we just finished smoking a good chunk of the meat yesterday. 1/2 my wife smoked with super hot pepper brine and honey and some of the rest was smoked with a salt brine, honey and apricots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thought I'd write an update on how our KuneKune pigs are doing. Weather has been really cold lately. Single digits during the day and near zero at nighf. Been feeding extra ration of bird waste. Not noticing any weight loss. Added extra bedding, I think it is over foot and a half deep. Can't do any cleaning as poop is froozen solid. I also make sure to give extra water through out the day as with all of our birds as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
We have found a problem with our feeding program. Bedding is getting deep. But on the good side piggies are high and dry with a nice hole for them all to cuddle in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Butchered our 1st boar from the piggies we got back in November. Didn't have any gilts or sows that wasn't his litter mate so at 4 1/2 months old he became our food. Also, my wife wanted to see how our feeding program is working. Honestly would have liked to see a little more fat on him. He was a little lean for winter cold. But my wife was happy with the meat. She likes her pork lean. So in her opinion he was great. Sorry, got too busy to get weights on him. Next one we butcher we'll try to get that information. On the real plus side my new Heritage Rough Rider 22lr, 6 and 1/2 inch barrel shooting 40 grain copper round nose bullet did a great job of dispatching him with one shot to the head.
 

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Would love to know their weights next time. They're always denser than they look I reckon our 7 month kunes range 50-80 lbs tho to the eye still small.

Would love to see pics. Could judge too if they're too lean or ok. Some people keep their kunes fat, then have trouble farrowing. Ours are lean but not too lean. Why waste money on ovee feeding if it leads to trouble anyway? Never understood it.
 
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