Our house is too humid

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Joshie, Oct 2, 2010.

  1. Joshie

    Joshie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    How in the world do you get rid of humidity in a house? Who would you have out to check things? Our house is on a crawl space. There's no water in the crawl space. It's wonderfully dry. It is humid in the house. I've never had such a problem. Heck, the inside of our toilet lid gets mildew on it. I've never seen that before.

    Ideas? I figure we need to get someone out here to fix whatever is going on.... I just don't know who to call out here.
     
  2. Jerngen

    Jerngen Perpetually curious! Supporter

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    Do you run a dehumidifer? Definitely do that.

    The only time I've seen your problem is with relatives who've bought good quality modular homes.
    The house is sealed SO tight that there isn't any natural ventilation.

    But ulitimately I know nothing about nothing when it comes to such things. Other then running a dehumidifer. :)
     

  3. Old Vet

    Old Vet In Remembrance

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    Ruining a dehumidifier is great and will take it away. Also open some windows and let the humid air out run a fan to get the outside air in. Your insulation is the cause. The colder the air is outside the dryer it is. It is a common error to keep the outside air out when is dryer than the inside air. It only gets worse as winter comes on.
     
  4. CrashTestRanch

    CrashTestRanch Well-Known Member

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    do you have any plumbing leaks? Leaky roof? Wet walls, foundation areas?
     
  5. Forerunner

    Forerunner Well-Known Member

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    We've had excess humidity in the house this year, as well, though I attribute the problem to the earlier rainy season and humid summer, both of which have passed, for us.
    I ran the wood stove when the humidity got the worst.The house was hot during, though the humidity was licked with just a couple heatings a few weeks apart during the worst of it.
     
  6. beaglebiz

    beaglebiz Wasza polska matka

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    Is your house vented?? DH insists homes need to "breathe" (he is a carpenter)
     
  7. Missy M

    Missy M Well-Known Member

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    Vapor barrier.
     
  8. Rita

    Rita Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I agree with Missy put down a plastic vapor barrier. We know of a place that had mildew problems and smelled musty but after putting down the barrier it was a wonderful change. Even if your crawlspace seems dry it could be emitting moisture.
     
  9. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    If you use a clothes dryer check the vent. The vent must go to the outside. After making certain you are not having a moisture source in the house do as stated and install a vapor barrier over the crawl space. Simple covering the soil of the crawl space with a heavy black plastic will do wonders. I realize you stated the crawl space was dry but ground moisture still will rise through the soil. PS...if the home has air conditioning make certain the drain on the evaporator portion is working.
     
  10. Joshie

    Joshie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    House was built during the 50s but placed on this foundation less than 5 years ago. Crawl space is dry. Vapor barrier is in place. They did not add exhaust fans in the bathrooms. We plan to add them and then add additional insulation in the attic, especially in the eaves. House felt damp all summer. We ran air all summer so it removed a lot of humidity. Clothes dryer if vented to the outside. We had that checked (and fixed) months ago.

    We don't have any wet walls or any known plumbing or other leaks. I guess maybe we need to have a plumber check to see if there's a leak we don't see. Argh!
     
  11. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    please describe the vapor barrier. There should not be any insulation in the eves. Is this a brick veneer home? It is essential to have a vent for the baths. Showers create a lot of moisture. If anyone is taking long showers then cease the habit. Store wet towels elsewhere, not in the non vent bathroom. Are you positive the AC is draining the moisture it extracts from the house air. Is there a duct for the HVAC in the bathroom? I know this is a lot of questions but that is how to recognize where the problem is arising.
     
  12. Patt

    Patt Well-Known Member

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    I would definitely invest in a dehumidifier. :)
     
  13. farmergirl

    farmergirl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Our state is too humid! Anyone got advice on how to solve THAT problem? lol
     
  14. Nevada

    Nevada Voice of Reason Supporter

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    Do you have air conditioning?
     
  15. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    I would suggest a whole house air exchanger. This is standard equipment is almost all home construction nowadays.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Old Swampgirl

    Old Swampgirl Well-Known Member

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    my house was built in 1936. The floor planks go across the floor beams with no other flooring & it had no insulation at all. Humidity here is so high we need gills to breath on most days. The house does best (& that ain't really "best") when the windows are open & it breathes, but that's hard to do in deep summer & a few weeks in winter. So, I have buckets of Damp Rid in all closets & the bathroom(which is built on the original back porch). This summer was so hot I had to run the 110 window ac at night. This caused the floor boards to buckle up & made a hump in the floor so high I'd trip on it during the night. Today, those boards have now gone down about 50%. My pantry is the place I had the most trouble with condensation/humidity; the sweat would roll down the walls & any food products, like pasta, that came in a cardboard box, would get damp & flaccid. So, I put took the small window out & put in a very small 110 ac, which I run all summer. It takes the water out & it drips outside. In the winter I run a dehummidifier, which has to be emptied every day. This is how I survive in the swamp.
     
  17. GoldenCityMuse

    GoldenCityMuse "Slick" Supporter

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    Buy a dehumidifier. More efficient or at least less expensive than running the AC.
     
  18. Joshie

    Joshie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We have a brand new high efficiency propane furnace and electric heat pump. Air is on when heat is not.

    House is very small and there's hardly enough room to hang towels in the bathrooms let alone anywhere else.
     
  19. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Staff Member Supporter

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    Ventilation.
    Wood heat.
    Stop water from coming in. (e.g., roof)
    Stop water vapor (e.g., basement)
     
  20. Joshie

    Joshie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wood heat is not an option nor is it desired. DH is in his 70s and I'm disabled. We're going to have someone put in bathroom fans and look at putting more attic ventilation and kind of go from there.