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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We got to the rabbit show early and let every one know we were looking for does to breed for meat.
we met up with the person that told us about the show.
she had told us she would sell us some does for $25 each. But when we got to the show they were priced at $35 each. We felt that she was pulling some thing on us, so we looked around and found one nice rex doe for $20.
Then some one told us there would be some one there with with some California rabbits, so we waited for him to show up. When he showed up he offered us a very nice doe for $50. A bit high, but after some discusion he came down to $35.
We were getting ready to leave when the lady who had offered us the original rabbits we had gone there to pick up, asked if we still wanted one of her does. i went over picked out the one I wanted and decieded to go ahead and pay the $35, but then she told me she had to keep the rabbit to finish showing her. That I would have to come back the next day to pick her up. My idea is she should have removed the price tag off the rabbit.
Or I could have a different lesser quality one for $20. This would be her choice of doe for the $20.
I felt like she was doing another bait and switch with me and tryed to back out of the situation, but she was determined to sell me something. So my dh went to pay for the rabbit and she put the rabbit in my arms all wrong and the stupid rabbit bit me on the arm causing a pretty good gash. I was so startled , I set the rabbit down and walked away. Telling her I would not buy her rabbit, no way.
We did get the Rex and the Californian doe and set of 3 stacking cages suitable for does and litters.
But I have decded I will never show animals. It has to be some of the worst abuse of animals I have ever seen.
The poor rabbits are in tiny little cages, being handled by strangers, on a 88 plus degree day.
No wonder the rabbit bit me.
 

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Farm lovin wife
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I'm sorry that you had a bad experience and I'm even more sorry that you feel the way you do.
We've been showing rabbits for over 15 years. They are not abused in any way. Most shows are only a day long and they are only held in their carriers for the day and they should be provided food, water and hay while they're there. Most show rabbits are handled on a daily basis and are quiet no matter who is handling them. All the rabbits we have shown do not mind being handled by the judges.
I will agree about the 88 degree day. Our shows here let off in June and don't pick up again till September, but each club is different. I don't know how she handed the rabbit to you, but it doesn't sound like she was very reputable all the way around and I guess tends to give all of us a bad name, but let me assure you, the people that show are very important to all breeds of rabbits, breeding out bad traits, genetic defects and poor quality out of rabbits that most people wouldn't notice or care about.

I sure hope you reconsider your stance. Most rabbit people are extremely friendly. I am sorry you had a bad experience. :Bawling:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
from what I understand this show is 3 days. Add to that the trip to the show and home, those poor rabbits are in those cages for 5 or more days.
This person's rabbits did not do well during showing as far as being handled.
I figured if she was that agressive with out babies to protect, I would have a terrible time if she kindled.
 

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I agree with 6e; I'm sorry you had a bad experience. Rabbit shows are not abusive, though like 6e I also think the temperature might have been a bit too warm for an outdoor show. Around here, summer shows are held indoors and so the temperature isn't an issue.

When we raised rabbits, they were handled constantly in order to make sure they were calm when they went on the table. A frightened, wild rabbit doesn't present itself well so it is very important that they be VERY used to handling. Anyone could handle our show bunnies with little risk of getting hurt because we made sure the rabbits were used to being handled BEFORE the show. Nothing will fail on the judge's table faster than a stressed, unhappy rabbit.

The small cages you saw were only for transportation. There are many reasons they are small, most of the reasons are based on the safety of the rabbit inside. Rabbits can injure themselves very easily when they become frightened and start flailing about. The small holes reduce the chance of getting hurt if they should become panicky and start thrashing. As 6e said, we always provided water and treats, as did all the exhibitors I knew.

When we came home from rabbit shows and put the rabbits back in their cages, they were unstressed enough that they tucked into their dinners. But then again, we (like the other exhibitors we knew) worked a lot with our rabbits to accustom them to the show environment, the transport cage and traveling.
 

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Farm lovin wife
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All the shows I've seen that are longer than a couple of days are coop shows and the rabbits are actually put in little cages. I haven't seen a show around here that was longer than a day or two that was a carrier show.

I have to agree that I wouldn't buy a rabbit that bites. May be the reason she was selling it. Although, if she told you one price and then changed it on you, she had no integrity anyway and shouldn't be delt with. Honesty and integrity are worth their weight in gold and I know how you feel. I've been burnt myself on more than one occassion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It will be quite a while before I forget what it looked like, seeing that open mouth with it's sharp little teeth heading for my arm.
I agree though most of the show participants were pretty helpful.
But I still feel bad for the rabbits.
As far as the lady with the biting rabbit, I hope she finds a way to tame them down. I try to handle my rabbits every day, it makes it better even if they are just for meat. I hope it makes it better for them at kindling time too.
 

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I can only imagine how shocking it was to be bitten like that! We usually think of rabbits as being pretty docile, but your experience demonstrates they can be aggressive. In the 7 years we raised rabbits, I don't remember getting really BITTEN (nipped a few times when feeding treats, but not blood letting bitten). However, I have a couple scars from getting scratched back when we first started and I didn't understand the importance of watching out for those back feet. I think I'd prefer the back feet to the teeth!

Your constant handling should make a big difference at kindling time. However, despite constant handling some of our does were very protective of their babies, making checking them a bit challenging. I always respected a mama protecting her offspring, and often used a hooked stick to pull the next box to the front of the cage rather than stick my arm in and risk the wrath of Mama. We never had a real problem with aggressive does, but my caution about placing myself in a position to get bitten may have something to do with that ;)
 

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MariaAZ said:
I can only imagine how shocking it was to be bitten like that! We usually think of rabbits as being pretty docile, but your experience demonstrates they can be aggressive. In the 7 years we raised rabbits, I don't remember getting really BITTEN (nipped a few times when feeding treats, but not blood letting bitten). However, I have a couple scars from getting scratched back when we first started and I didn't understand the importance of watching out for those back feet. I think I'd prefer the back feet to the teeth!

Your constant handling should make a big difference at kindling time. However, despite constant handling some of our does were very protective of their babies, making checking them a bit challenging. I always respected a mama protecting her offspring, and often used a hooked stick to pull the next box to the front of the cage rather than stick my arm in and risk the wrath of Mama. We never had a real problem with aggressive does, but my caution about placing myself in a position to get bitten may have something to do with that ;)
I was bitten a number of years ago when we very first started raising rabbits by a Mini Lop. We were also raising ferrets at that time and I had just gotten done messing with the ferrets and went over to check a Mini Lop doe that had babies. Big mistake! Before I could even blink she ran up and bit me on the hand. We all live and we learn.

But you're right. Even does that are handled all the time and are sweet can be aggressive when you mess with their babies. And those back feet. I have scars on my stomach from when I was young given to me by a Satin. :rolleyes:
 

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It sounds like that woman was just a mess. Switching prices, switching rabbits, trying to show rabbits that were clearly unaccustomed to being handled..

Congrats on your two new does!
 
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