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Discussion Starter #1
We have two orphan lambs and also triplet lambs who mom is having a challenge feeding, and wondered if any of you have suggestions in feeding them better.

We have had orphan goats in the past, and mainly fed them whole milk. This year we have a neighboring farm who is willing to sell us milk from their bulk tank, which is better than store bought milk. We would consider using milk replacer, but do not have the proper facilities to mix it accurately today.

Is there something we should supplement the lambs or goats with when feeding whole milk? Some vitamins or pro biotic additives that anyone has used. With the goats we know we have selenium issues amongst others, so likely some of the same ones exist with the sheep.

Reading on the sites Down Under, the masters of the sheep world, well...they have products and suggestions, but just not sure how to translate them to what we can get here?
 

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I took a gallon size of milk. Took out 3 cups. Put 1 cup buttermilk and 1 can evaporated milk. Shook up. Fed for the first 3 weeks. You can keep the buttermilk going. I bought a pint size of cultured buttermilk. Used 1 cup for my formula and added 1 cup whole milk to the left over buttermilk container and shake. Leave out on the counter for 6-12 hours. You'll be able to tell when the process completes. It always has done good for me with my goats.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am a bit Confused on what you are suggesting
I took a gallon size of milk. Took out 3 cups. Put 1 cup buttermilk and 1 can evaporated milk. Shook up. Fed for the first 3 weeks. You can keep the buttermilk going. I bought a pint size of cultured buttermilk. Used 1 cup for my formula and added 1 cup whole milk to the left over buttermilk container and shake. Leave out on the counter for 6-12 hours. You'll be able to tell when the process completes. It always has done good for me with my goats.
 

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Raising three orphan goats now on whole cows milk....they are thriving. Weaning has started, they now get 15 oz of milk mixed with 5 oz of water twice a day. They were getting 20 oz of milk 3 times a day. WONDERFUL dairy farmer down the road... fill the pail, leave the $ and come when needed!!!! They are 8 weeks old, eating hay and grain. It has been a commitment but the doeling we will keep to replace her great mom. She was 9, had quads again, one was not good at birth, and mon died 4 hours later...we were shocked.
 

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To address your lambs. Either supplement the lambs and leave with mom. OR take the largest away and bottle feed....checking often the other two left with mom. OR take all away and bottle feed. People think they should take the smallest away to bottle feed...no. First, too stressful for an already struggling baby and they nurse their moms a little often. If smallest was getting pushed out by siblings it will have a better chance to nurse now.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
One we gave some cod liver oil as we read it can give them strength and comfort in the joints.

Any thoughts on this?

It seemed to help and gave him about 5cc for two days straight, with likely 3 of it taken in. He didn’t like it of course, but,..?
 

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Lambs need a larger amount of fat than cows do so to supplement or bottle feed, you need MORE fat than whole cows' milk. There's a milk replacement recipe for lambs online somewhere that I have used over and over for bottle lambs. It involves heavy whipping cream, whole milk, an egg...but I don't know the amounts and would rather you looked for yourself rather than rely on my amounts. Do the lambs have weak joints? If they are up and running why do they need help? I don't give an animal any unnecessary thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yes, Selenium is low, gave him 1cc shot of Bo-se, and also have given him selenium e gel.

one of the two vets feel he didn't get enough colostrum at birth, so will always have a weakened immune system. more susceptible to things, like an aids patient he compared him too.

I do believe he is over the worst of it, but still not overly weighty and needs to catch up on feeding him. I think I will research what you suggest above in fattening up his milk and stop at a local dairy/cheese factory to get him some heavy cream of sorts, and also a family who has a goat milking operation...met them, and they have done some amazing things with some weak goats.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Lambs need a larger amount of fat than cows do so to supplement or bottle feed, you need MORE fat than whole cows' milk. There's a milk replacement recipe for lambs online somewhere that I have used over and over for bottle lambs. It involves heavy whipping cream, whole milk, an egg...but I don't know the amounts and would rather you looked for yourself rather than rely on my amounts. Do the lambs have weak joints? If they are up and running why do they need help? I don't give an animal any unnecessary thing.

Is this what you were thinking?

https://colliefarm.wordpress.com/2011/04/08/homemade-lamb-milk-replacer/

1 two-quart carton of whole (vitamin D) milk
1/4 cup heavy whipping cream
1 egg
–>whisk egg and cream together, add milk
The deal with sheep versus cow’s milk is that sheep have richer milk. It’s higher in fat, protein, calcium, and calories; so cow’s milk alone won’t grow lambs adequately. Because lambs have a small frame size, and are taking in a much smaller total volume of milk, they need more fat and calorie concentration to stay warm and grow, compared to a calf. And of course, whole milk in the store isn’t really whole, it’s had its cream skimmed off. But adding the cream back, plus an egg, apparently brings it in more line with sheep’s milk.
 

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Farmmaid I am real sorry to hear about your loss. We give our goats selenium gel three or four times a year. I agree if your going to take one away take the healthiest. We have raised bottle kids on whole cows milk and kayro syrup many times We used to buy day old kids from goat dairy farmer and bottle feed them. Also my mom has supplemented her lambs with both goats milk and whole cows milk. good luck
 
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