Organic dairy people, please read

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by ladycat, Jun 11, 2006.

  1. ladycat

    ladycat Chicken Mafioso Staff Member

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  2. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Organic consumers should realise that it isn't a humane route. If an animal gets sick on an organic farm, and NEEDS treatment with antibiotics to save it. You can't keep it on the farm, you have to send it off the farm. Is that humane? No, the animal going off the farm will suffer emotional anxiety. When you take an animal away from its herd, it does not like it, and does act depressed.


    How do you bypass this? You either comply, or turn a blind eye, treat it, hold off on the milk and stick it back in the string. The way to go is Certified Humane. You can treat an animal ONLY if need be, and you can keep it. It makes more sence than organic. Funny thing, you can take your herd, the herd you have treated in the past, transition it for a year and call it organic. The organic part is a joke, the impression I had was that the animal was raised from start to milk on nothing but organic feed. But that isn't true, you can transition ANY herd.


    We told someone of what I said, someone who is into organics. She had no idea about that info, she thought the animals were treated like the old school way, not true.

    People want to know where the milk is coming from, with certified humane, you are guarenteed the farm is 30 milking cows or smaller. They don't allow anything bigger.


    Jeff
     

  3. petefarms

    petefarms Well-Known Member

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    JeffFarms, this is the first I"ve heard of certified humane, can you post more details or info, thanks. Petefarms.
     
  4. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    There seems to be a lack of definition of what the "small farm" the consumer claims to want their food to come from really is. Last week I read an article in the John Deere Corporation magazine "THE FURROW" about dairy farming.
    The article went on and on about how the "small" farm in the article could survive utilizing family labor and local resources. The farmer in the article quoted how he was not bothered by the large dairy farms around him, and that he could do well as a small farmer. This farmer was milking 600 cows in two different barns and farming 1200 acres of crops!!!!
    SO HOW DO WE DEFINE SMALL, LARGE, OR FAMILY??????????????????

    **IN regards to Organic Milk Production, I think it was a good thing for the farmer and the consumer ---but--- there are some serious issues the Organic industry will need to get sorted if they expect to retain any consumer confidence in their product.
    What Happens when Organic Dairy Products becomes big business??
    With Wal Mart entering the Organic dairy business, will they simply control that market and thus dictate the farmer's pay price based on what is profitable for Wal Mart???
    History shows that the longer the journey milk takes from the cow to the consumer's table, the less value the consumer and dairy farmer receive.
     
  5. VTdairy

    VTdairy Just Graduated

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    Jeff, Certified Humane doesn't have any size restrictions that I'm aware of. Vermont just had their first dairy to be labeled as Certified Humane Raised and Handled and they are milking upwards of 100 brown swiss. The farm is Shelburne Farms, btw.
     
  6. ladycat

    ladycat Chicken Mafioso Staff Member

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  7. milkinpigs

    milkinpigs Dairy/Hog Farmer

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    We just got a questionaire from DFA concerningBST use and how much per cwt. it would take to stop using it.If the consumers will continue to demand from the processors that they want milk from cows NOT given BST or they want more organic, they can have an effect that would help most of the dairy farmers on this forum. Ladycat,you seem to be a lady who stays well informed and have the ability to relate your info to others.Perhaps you could spread the word that the consumer is being heard and can help those who don't want the mega dairies taking over.
     
  8. ladycat

    ladycat Chicken Mafioso Staff Member

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    It's true, more and more consumers are demanding rBGH-free milk. Even Walmart recently asked their suppliers to begin supplying rBGH-free milk.


    SOME MAJOR U.S. DAIRIES ELIMINATING rBGH OVER THE PAST YEAR

    April, 2005 - Tillamook's cheeses: The second largest producer of block cheese in the U.S.
    June, 2005 - Eberhard Dairy: Central Oregon's largest dairy processing plant.
    Nov., 2005 - Alpenrose Dairy in Portland
    Feb. 2006 - Darigold's yogurts: A large western U.S. dairy.
    June 2006 - Garelick: A large East Coast dairy processor, producing 45 million lbs. of milk per month.
    June 2006 - Meadow Gold and Darigold Farms: Montana's largest milk producers.


    According to Oregon Physicians for Social Responsibility
    In the U.S., so many consumers in Maine have refused to buy dairy products from rBGH-treated cows that there is virtually no milk sold there from cows that have received it. In northern California, most dairy farmers and dairies have also stopped using the drug in response to consumer demand. (read the full document HERE )

    OrganicConsumers.org reports that: In response to this and a series of actions in the past year of dairies going rBGH-free, Monsanto is now lowering the price of rBGH to try to cling to its dwindling market.

    Consumers are getting more savvy, and of course what the consumer wants, they get, if they yell loudly enough.
     
  9. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    I like the idea of certified humane whether or not it is related to organic. Perhaps I'm wrong but people investing the time to be humane will probably not use junk chemicals anyway- may not be organic but may be just as healthy in the long run. But to comment on your quote above, what I find disturbing about the monster farming industry is that they don't necessarily have to tell consumers anything; there is always a new secret and it takes a decade to flush it out. With my one beloved Jersey, I read labels for any supplementation and for her small daily grain ration. She grazes all day on non-pesticde, non-chemically fertilized pasture but I can't sell an ounce of milk; can't even give it away. More loved, and more non-stressed (I'm the one stressed) a cow is not. What's wrong with this picture?
     
  10. ladycat

    ladycat Chicken Mafioso Staff Member

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    I agree absolutely 100%. Organic is NOT always better. I pass up some organic brands in order to buy from small producers who do it "right". Those who keep their animals on pasture and farm on a small scale. Those who are not afraid to use antibiotics wisely (ie, only when necessary, and they remove the afflicted animal from the herd only until it's well and off antibiotics again, rather than discarding it like certified organic farms do).
    I prefer sustainability and wise farming practices, true family farms, over the corporate monsters that are destroying the true meaning of organic.
     
  11. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Yeap. One has to weigh what is important for sustainability. Its subjective and I don't want to push my own personal agenda. I own my dairy goats and my dairy cow and I've got the land for them. Regardless of what the dairy industry condones... those without the means are at the mercy unless they speak up, but imo, in this as in so many other vital issues, complacency is bliss.