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Discussion Starter #1
Just wanted to let everyone know about a rare opportunity to purchase two, count 'em, two historic barn-frame looms of late-1700 or early 1800' vintage.
Owned by Historic Madison, Indiana, offered to those who truly want atmosphere in their atelier and have room for the same.
PM me for photos.
Nothing like sitting down to weave on a loom that if it could talk, would impart stories from the golden age of home-produced textiles. Just putting one's hand on the beater, worn smooth over decades of weaving, is quite an experience.
And no, I'm not buying them, already got one of the early 1800's looms along with all my other looms, I love my historic behemoth, it's unlike anything else to weave on. They are located in Madison on the southeast corner of Indiana, I am clear over on the west side of the state, but if someone is really interested in one or both of these looms (one is listed for $50, whatta deal!) I'll arrange to go over there with you and look them over. You'll need a pickup truck or a hefty SUV with luggage racks for transport, they do come apart and go back together pretty easily, it's how they were made. Buy one or both!
Call me a shameless enabler. It's true.


:cute:​
 

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Yay you did it! I deleted mine, lol! Hopefully someone will step forward.
 
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Can any pictures be posted here? What does a "barn-frame" loom look like? Well, I guess I can go Google it. Not, of course, that I'm interested in buying it. Other than the cost of shipping is the sheer lack of space to put it in. But it would be interesting to see what it looks like.
 

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I sure wish I lived close enough. I'd bring one of those home. I've seen videos of those in action and it's just wonderful to watch.

Osiris, I think there are videos and instructions online to help people resurrect these. There are lots of people here that would welcome such a challenge. And, you're really not that far away :)

I am not positive but I think there's one in a museum about 100 miles from here. I know that local guild was working to restore a loom in a museum, and I think it might be one of these. Actually, it'd be a nice project for a guild anywhere that had the room.
 

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>....And, you're really not that far away :) .....<
Oh you enabler you! I've done my share of rescuing thank you!
I still have a Weaver's Delight I want to get rid of!!!

Those are beautiful machines! The wood alone is worth 5 hundred dollars easy. Yeah it's not rocket science to restore it, but it requires a LOT of room and a strong floor and time. That's why those looms were in outbuildings by themselves. They weren't used all the time. But they were indispensable.

If I lived 2 blocks from there I couldn't do it! That's why I advise contacting as many guilds as possible in the surrounding states. I just hate to see such beautiful pieces of craftsmanship fall to ruin. At least they're in a building and not in an old shed in pieces.

Here's one!
http://madison.craigslist.org/art/4737979020.html
 

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Thanks, Osiris, for the links. I'll post it on SWIFT (an Indiana guilds org)as well, good idea.
Yes they must be saved, and truly they are wonderful when cleaned and warped up - I almost always put a warp of blue & white cotton ticking on a "restored/resurrected" barn frame loom, to try things out. They've never failed me yet, and really they're about as simple technologically as it gets.
I do hope some of you dedicated loomists on this forum spread the word, or optimally build a loomhouse out back, or whatever it takes. I picture myself becoming that little old lady in Back to the Future, waving a brochure in Michael J Fox's face and screeching, "Save the clock tower!" except it would be "Save the Looms!"
 
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