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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Said to be 4.5 years old, unregistered, friendly, docile and taking a couple months rest before rebreeding. Owner asking $125 or partial barter for items I have. I'm a goat newbie and appreciate help.


p.s. aside from feeling her udder what things would want to inspect? Can you judge age with teeth like in sheep?

Thanks

 

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Well, everyone will tell you to get the CAE/CL tests done first.

She looks like a decent family milker type of goat. She has a long rump that usually means a good foreudder and area of attachment. Feet and legs look good- front legs might be toed-out/narrow chested, but she might be standing funny. Her hooves are trimmed and she sure doesn't look wormy.

She is fat, fatter than I would want to see a Swiss breed doe. She should be bred ASAP. Goats don't need to be dried off until they are three months pregnant. She's also totally the wrong color for an Ober. Either 1) there's a funny camera exposure 2) she's actually an Alpine or a random cross goat or 3) she has a severe copper issue. Obers are bay red.



I'd want to see an udder on a milk doe, and milk her. Buying a dry doe is like buying a horse without riding it or seeing it ridden. Goats' inscisors have the same replacement timeline as sheep, so you can age them using sheep guidelines.
 

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I have some Obers and they really don't look like that. They are a darker, brighter color. Also, I would be suspicious as to why she has been left open. There's no reason to give her a rest like that.

She doesn't look fat to me, though.

Cliff
 

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She doesn't look fat to me, though.

Cliff
Her front end, brisket, neck, and over the ribs all look filled with fat to me. Her loin looks okay yet cuz she hasn't got to that part yet. :) What can I say, i like them dairy :)
 

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She looks almost EXACTLY the same as one of my american alpine does. I would HIGHLY doubt that she is oberhalsi, and go with unregistered alpine. They're far more common and therefore more likely that she is one - and the coloration is a little off.

If you get her, cut off her grain and breeder her back (or pay for stud fee at the old owner's place). Just free feed quality hay until about two weeks before her duedate, then start introducing grain to her so when she freshens and you start milking, she's accustomed to getting grain.

She's a pretty decent doe for a home milker, she is set up funny but nothing really jumps out at me as serious.
 

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Her color could be from being copper deficient. Yes, test before you commit.
 

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It is always cool to see others looking to get into the hobby. We have Alpines and Toggenburgs on our farm here in Indy. She resembles and Alpine to me to... At first. But look at that under belly. And her legs, face, stripe down her back, etc... So I did some research. How tall is she? Most of our alpines are under 28" and most average around 26". She also doesnt look like she has the nodules that many of our registered alpines have. I found several sites with pictures that describe Oberhasli as bein anything from a light chamois (bay) to a deep red bay or black being acceptable and preffered but that other colors are not unheard of. Definately look at the bag but take some things into consideration. Has she been used as a milker a lot in the past? If she was dried up quick (she does look a little fat in some places) her udder may reflect that which could worry some people and be nothing at all. Weve had several does that weve dried up still have large udders. Be worried if it is hard though or hot. Its always hard when your a newby. Look at the animals eyes and disposition too. Is she energetic and clear eyed? Does she have a good temperament? Does the person seem nervous and worried about money or genuinely interested in the animals well being? Does he ask you questions about caring for the animal or just try to unload her quickly. Does he have other animals and are they all healthy? The CAE/CL testing doesnt cost a whole lot or take much time to get back. If you like the animal and are that worried see if he will hold her for you while you have it done. Just my two cents worth. We really enjoy our goats. you will to if you start with the right one (or herd) which ever you choose. GOOD LUCK!
 

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Wrong color. Shrekkie ears though - which means Ober! Is she shaved?

...more like a $55-75 goat...

...sorry...

I LIKE her rump though!

I've seen some Obes that look like Hereford cows in stocky-ness and some Obes that are long-necked dairy-style.

She SHOULD be bay-red. Mahogany. You can give copper in boluses like some of us do...
 

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Yeah, I guess she's chubby-ish towards the front. I guess just not in good condition. She needs to run around a bit. ;-)

I don't think she's pure Ober, really. I hope they're not charging more than about $50.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I thank you all VERY much for your help. I get overly excited about new homesteady projects which has been a problem. I bite off more than I can chew, make bad choices sometimes etc. etc.

She may very well be a nice goat but unless I have some proof like papers or at a minimum a fresh udder it just is too much of a risk for a newbie.

DH is NOT a goat fan after we had a nasty pygmy with horns who was uber destructive and bullied our sheep. I would have to beg and plead to get a goat on property. One more bad one and I am up a creek on my milk plans. A dairy sheep is too pricey and too far for me to hope for.

Thanks for talking some sense into me. not the answer I wanted but certainly the answer I needed.


BTW the owner is a back yard type which I try not to discriminate against since I am too, but you know how it goes.........

Doe is supposed to be 30" and was used at one point for family milker then petting zoo. Supposedly changing breeds and concerned about what I see as her pet finding a good home. Says doe is too timid around other goats and gets bullied. Owner is also the one who prompted my "stupid question" thread elsewhere in goat forum.

......in other words just a few details that don't add up enough for me to deduct from the ole check book.

As much as I would like to give people the benefit of the doubt it usually ends up being expensive for me. Like I mentioned to the owner, I treat every animal as suspect until proven otherwise no matter how nice the owner seems.




*sigh* anybody got a budget friendly, newbie appropriate goat anywhere near Saint Louis......... :)
 

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You might have better luck with goats if you get 2 instead of just one. Most are happier if they have a buddy :)
 

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I don't know what you all are seeing and saying that she is a fat goat! Y'all need to get one of those handy dandy body scoring cards that Dr. An Peischel from Tn St. U. puts out- She is not fat= She is about the correct weight and mass for a doe like herself, right about a 3.0 in body condition, exactly where she should be. No excess fleshing anywhere (ie. able to 'pinch an inch' behind those elbows, etc.), no plumped up dorsal process, etc. Being wide bodied sometimes makes them look 'fat'.

She's also an Alpine, not Obie- the shape of her head is a dead giveaway- straight, flat face and square muzzle, not dished face with upturned corners of the mouth.
 

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OMG, ....she looks like a, ...a GOAT to me Hintonlady, which means she'll have the devil in her. TRUST YOUR HUSBAND....."Use the Force, Alison" I'll PM ewe to straighten you out.... LOL:duel:
 

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Y'all need to get one of those handy dandy body scoring cards that Dr. An Peischel from Tn St. U. puts out- She is not fat= She is about the correct weight and mass for a doe like herself, right about a 3.0 in body condition,
I believe Dr. Peischel's BCS chart is for meat goats. Not applicable or appropriate for dairy goats.
 

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Dr. Peiscel's chart *is* applicable to ALL goats.

After having taken the TN Master Meat Goat Producer's Course, and having seen her speak and demonstrate body condition scoring on meat and dairy animals several times, the concepts are *Exactly* the same for both meat and dairy.

Take a look at her dorsal process. It is still visble. Do not mistake excellent width throughout for fat- she is a very wide doe and carries the proper amount of weight for her frame. No excess fleshing. I'd give her a good solid 3.5, which is where she needs to be- many show animals are up to 4.5- 5.0 which way too fat. You can see fat like that in their legs, udders, etc. Not to mention that this doe has a winter coat to account for.

I would pay $125 for this doe.
 

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some goat owner think a dairy doe looks more dairy if she shows some bone.
i'm always wondering how those does are capable of sustaining production.
looking at USDA data, lots of does drop drastically in their production after only four month. since a lot of show homes drying up their does after only five moth, maybe this little bit extra is not so important?
in my opinion, a good productive dairy doe should have some reserves to milk for ten month or more.
i know there is a very fine line from being well conditioned or fat. ;)
i don't see this doe too fat either and would bred her so she will not gain excess fat if she stays dry for a season.
$125 is very fair. ;)
 

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well, you have all the answers you need I think. I just wanted to say that I wouldn't pay $1 for this doe if she didn't have a neg. CAE test from her and the rest of her herd, unless she was raised CAE prev. and had a neg. CAE test and I actually believed she (the owner) knew what she was talking about. So maybe some people test, do they also house neg. and pos. goats together? Do they vaccinate the herd w/o changing needles out? ECT...ECT... What a headache to start out with and no, I wouldn't pay $1 for any more headaches in my life. And I also thought she was awfully fleshy in the front end. I have several wide does and none would look that hefty coming out of a milking season and not bred.
 

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Look at her point of elbow....oh yeah...you can't see her point of elbow...because she is fat :)

She is pretty typical of most folks dairy goats, not in milk, a doe not in milk fed grain looks like this doe. I actually think she is lovely. I also have never seen a nicer Obie even at a show in Texas! Course obies here are small pathetic creatures with udders even when dry that hang down to the ground :) They do get the color right though!

It would be terribly odd for her to be sold in milk this time of year with milk at a premium winter prices. Now I wouldn't buy her unless you have something to breed her to or she comes bred, your almost out of breeding season anyway.

And of course it's a given you don't buy anything without sending in blood to biotracking.com for a $4 CAE test. Vicki
 
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