Opinions on shock collars

Discussion in 'Working and Companion Animals' started by Irish Pixie, Dec 6, 2006.

  1. Irish Pixie

    Irish Pixie Well-Known Member

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    We have a 7 month old beagle puppy. Molly is a great natured little dog, and we love her, however, she does not listen well. She is better for me than DH but she's not good for either of us. Being a hound she would rather sniff around than do what we tell her to do. Is a shock collar a good attention getter?

    Stacy
     
  2. jen74145

    jen74145 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ah, the joys of a hound puppy. :rolleyes: Most stubborn pups I've ever raised, but they're worth it.
    I think you should consider the temperament of your pup before you decide to use a collar; if she's timid or skittish to begin with, just going to make things worse.
    That said, I feel your pain! Took us eighteen months to get my dad's beagle pup to halfway listen. Still have vivid memories of climbing over a fence and into some rosebushes to get that darned dog...
     

  3. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    Shock collars can do quite well IF they are used properly. Get an adjustable one so you can regulate the strength of the "shock". It should barely "tingle" them. If it causes pain its set too high. Ive used mine to stop a Maremma pup from using lambs as "chew toys", and to break my Coonhound from chasing the chickens. It only took a couple of sessions each. The key to training ANY dog is to spend LOTS of time with it. At 7 months, yours still has a lot of puppy in her and may grow out of some behaviors. With my Maremma the problem I had was she wouldnt do it if I was near her, and with 2 other dogs in the pasture, yelling "NO" just caused confusion. With the collar I was able to correct her from the house even if she was several hundred yards away in the back pasture.

    http://www.gundogsonline.com/dog-training-collars/
     
  4. Irish Pixie

    Irish Pixie Well-Known Member

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    You mean I can't leave it on high until the smoke starts billowing off her standing-on-end fur? J/K :grin: It's evil but I *have* thought about it when she is: chasing the cats in the house, chewing her gazillionth thing of the day, taking off and running huge circles around the horses in the pasture- she THINKS they like her, or eating out of the kitty pans. If you look up the word "willful" in the dictionary there's a picture of a beagle.

    Yes, she's still young and I spend a lot of time with her but she's going to get hurt running around the pasture, I have an old gelding that doesn't "suffer fools well." I guess I'll order a collar and make sure it has settings.

    Thanks for the help.

    Stacy
     
  5. TedH71

    TedH71 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Exercise, discpline, then affection. Works for me. Of course, it's a Cesar Millan's motto and I have to admit it works for my dogs.
     
  6. SDjulieinSC

    SDjulieinSC Well-Known Member

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    My dogs figured out pretty quickly that they needed to behave when the was collar on, this meant no chasing goats. The down side to that was they knew if the collar was off they were safe!! Now I know why they make dummy collars! Guess I should have orderd one of those as well..........
     
  7. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    Like has been stated above, a collar can be wonderful for the right dog and right handler. I use one myself. Here's a nice place to start: http://www.dobbsdogs.com/library/index.html. Look through all the categories even if they don't apply to you. A lot of the articles can be applied to other disciplines or just basic good manners.
     
  8. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    Thanks for the link. It looks like a great place to learn some things!
     
  9. GoatsRus

    GoatsRus TMESIS

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    It has worked wonderfully for us. We have a very stubborn boston terrier. We couldn't keep her from chewing, chasing the cats, chickens and goats. The worst thing she was doing was running straight under the cars that would come in the driveway. We bought it for her safety more than anything else. We only had to "shock" her a half dozen times since we've had it (there are 4 shock levels). Now we just push the "bad dog" buzzer (no shock administered) and she stops dead doing what she's doing. I would recommend one for training almost any puppy.
     
  10. mare

    mare Well-Known Member Supporter

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    my son has a 1 1/2 yr old beagle, he was thinking of getting a collar for her. thanks for the info---i didnt think they made them small enough for his Molly. they are the cutest little dogs--but STUBBORN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  11. Irish Pixie

    Irish Pixie Well-Known Member

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    Another beagle named Molly! :grin: They are stubborn, and willfull, but they are sweet- especially when they're asleep.

    Stacy
     
  12. Ella

    Ella Active Member

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    I am always suggesting this guy, but I feel that his training methods are very useful. People think his methods are for GSDs only, but that is not true. So, here is a DVD that I have and I thought it was very helpful: http://www.leerburg.com/318.htm., and here are the collars that he suggests: http://www.leerburg.com/equip.htm#ecollar. I don't know if 7 months is old enough to use one; it depends on the dog.
     
  13. Irish Pixie

    Irish Pixie Well-Known Member

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    I had no idea how many different kinds of training collars there were- truly amazing. We went to a new Petsmart that just opened and picked out a PetSafe (I guess it's one of the better brands) that has an audio alert that is used before the "zap." This one has 10 settings, and is made for smaller dogs. I'm going to try it in the house today when she chases kitties- she's making life miserable for them. The lowest setting is just a tingle/vibration, but I'm hoping just the audio will get her attention so we can divert her to something more construcive.

    Again, thanks for you help.

    Stacy