One of my doelings is not thriving.....

Discussion in 'Goats' started by dk_40207, Apr 28, 2006.

  1. dk_40207

    dk_40207 Well-Known Member

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    They are 1 1/2 weeks old, Saanen, but were born 9 days early. After a bumpy start, they seem pretty alright. My concern is that one of the twins is very noticably smaller/skinnier then her sister.
    She is active to a degree, but when I try to bottle feed her(they are on their momma, but I try to bottle feed occasionally because they only nurse one side), she just doesn't suck much at all, and her sister(the big one) sucks with gusto!

    This leads me to believe that Rose(the little girl) is weaker in addition to being smaller.

    What should I do? :help:

    Christina-- and yes, these are my first goats:)

    Oh, and the little fleshy-nubby thingies under the chins--Rose only has one, whats up with that?
     
  2. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    First, the 'fleshy thingies under their chins', LOL! They are called wattles (you'll see it mis-spelled sometimes as 'waddles'). Some goats have none, some have one, and some have two. It doesn't mean anything at all.

    Babies who are nursing aren't going to be very eager to take a bottle so I don't think you can go by that. Try weighing them on a very accurate scale, if you have one, first thing in the morning and again at night or the next morning and see if they are gaining even an ounce or two. If so, they are getting something to eat. Hopefully, your little girl is just getting enough from mom that she has no incentive to want the bottle. Unfortunately, sometimes one is sickly due to something internally wrong, and in that case they usually don't make it. And, while sad, it's better that they don't make it.

    Are you milking the mom out on the side they aren't nursing?

    Kathleen
     

  3. dk_40207

    dk_40207 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I'm milking her out on the left side...they just won't nurse on it! I'm getting between 3-4 cup 2x a day on the one side. She had a bit of mastits(I think) there were blood clots in her milk, then the next day it was pink and the blood would settle to the bottom. She is on day 5 of penn shots.

    Sometimes I milk the nursing side a bit--she HATES it when I touch that side. She has some little bumps on it..I'll upload some pics and post about that tomorrow.

    So just "let it be", so to speak? Like I said she is active-just very small next to her sister(who will take milk from a bottle like a maniac!).

    And is it normal for the doelings to shake/jerk their heads and "spazz out" as we call it? It's almost as if their are bugs flying around their heads...but there isn't. They really seem well, though.

    Blessings,
    Christina

    Wattles--I thought that was just a bird thing LOL. I just noticed that Daisy has 2 and Rose has 1. At least now I can tell them apart!
     
  4. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    For all the years I've had goats, I've been blessed to have few udder problems, so I'm not sure what to tell you about the bumps. Hopefully someone else will see when you post your pictures and be able to help.

    If your small baby seems vigorous, and is gaining weight (I really would weigh her a couple of times to be sure, though), then she's probably fine. I have one Kinder doe kid (one of quads) who is half the size of her three brothers and sisters, and she always will be. There isn't anything wrong with her, she's just tiny -- and she was the first one to be able to jump out of the baby pen (it only has 30" sides on it, and the kids are usually jumping out of it by the time they are three weeks old -- she was just over two weeks, lol! She's a little jumping bean!). Of course, Kinders have half Pygmy genetics, and sometimes it still comes out, which is why you get a tiny one once in a while -- or an oversized one taking more after the Nubian side of the family. Saanens shouldn't be doing that, but there will still be size differences.

    The one thing you could do with your small baby is take her clear away from her mother, and force her to take the bottle if she wants to eat. That way you'd know exactly how much she was getting. But, it would stress her, and if she is already struggling at all, it might not be a good thing to do. They should be starting to nibble on hay by now. If you can make sure they have good leafy alfalfa available, if their milk supply is short, they will soon start making it up in hay. And you can start teaching them to eat grain, too -- maybe offer them some calf manna. If you let their mom have a little, they will get the idea more quickly by watching her eat it.

    Kathleen
     
  5. dk_40207

    dk_40207 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Kathleen, yes they are starting to nibble on hay and grass. They were licking the mineral block with Nanny yesterday....

    I guess Rose is just tiny! That is why my daughter picked her--she wanted the smallestest one!

    I'm uploading that udder photo in a few..

    Christina
     
  6. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I second the calf manna....I use it too.

    And I would have to see the bumps....blisters, pox... :shrug: soremouth/orf? babies would have it too.

    You need to teach nanny to let you touch her anywhere and she has to stay steady....say "no" firmly when naughty and talk soothingly while she is cooperating.

    Admittedly...I love the challenge of first-time milkers and stubborn goats...I seem to have the "thing" with them.....I love turning them into kittens! :p
     
  7. moonspinner

    moonspinner Well-Known Member

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    I have heard of some bumps on the udder actually being a staph infection. But since I haven't dealt with udder problems not speaking from experience. Are you sure the head shaking on the kids isn't lice or mites? I would definitely keep an eye on your smaller kid and make sure she's feeding enough. Especially since they came that early.
     
  8. allenslabs

    allenslabs Saanen & Boer Breeder

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    Hey there how is she doing now? Is she still alive and hopping around? Sometimes there seems to be one that is smaller. Not really sure why but it happens. As long as you make sure she is nursing momma you know she is alive. You might just have to hold the teat and hold back the big girl and watch her nurse. If you need peace of mind that is. Does she use the restroom? If she does then I'm sure she's eating.
     
  9. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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    Good luck with your tiny girl, I will be praying for her. Good luck. Bye.
     
  10. dk_40207

    dk_40207 Well-Known Member

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    Update on little rose. She is still small....but turning into the bully! She pushes her big sister around! She is not nearly as social as her sister, but seems to be doing great!