One mystery sovled, new problem

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by WanderingOak, Apr 14, 2005.

  1. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    Earlier I posted concerning a check engine light that wouldn't go away, even after replacing all related parts: http://www.homesteadingtoday.com/showthread.php?t=67789 . Well, yesterday afternoon, I was working on replacing the fuel filter when I discovered what the problem was. It seems that there was a mouse nest on top of the gas tank of my car. I discovered it when I disconnected the fuel pump to relieve pressure in the system. The wiring pigtail for the fuel tank pressure sensor had been almost completely chewed through by the mice. Once I get my car back together again, I am probably going to stuff the nest with mothballs, just to keep the mice from coming back.

    Like I said, one mystery solved. Now, however, I have another problem. The fuel filter is held up against the firewall under the hood of the car by a metal bracket. One of the fuel lines came off quite easily. However, the other line will not budge no matter what I do. The filter has a 3/4 inch threaded nut on that end, and the line going into the filter is smooth. No matter what I try, the filter will not turn. Instead, the only think I am able to accomplish is bending either the bracket, the fuel line, or both. I have both the factory service manual and the Chiltons book, and neither one explains how to get that last fuel line off. Has anybody had any experience with removing this type of filter?
     
  2. tallpines

    tallpines Well-Known Member

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    It never ceases to amaze us as to how much dog food the mice manage to carry up under the hood of the car when it doen't get used for a few days.
     

  3. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Assuming that you have the bracket removed, I would grab the old fuel filter with a channel-lock pliers and the 3/4" nut with a open-end wrench. Hold the filter still with the pliers while torking on the wrench.
     
  4. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    The nut is either welded or braised onto the filter. The filter has to turn to remove it from the fuel line.
     
  5. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Is there another hex-shaped nut that screws into the 3/4" treaded nut...like a flare fitting nut? There is no way that the fuel line should receive any stress when removing a fuel filter. If you see a second nut, put a wrench on it and a wrench on the 3/4" nut. Hold the the fuel filter from rotating using the 3/4" wrench and turn the 2nd flare-fitting nut with its wrench.

    That flare-fitting nut on the fuel line would look something like the photo below and it would screw into the 3/4" nut welded to the fuel filter:
    [​IMG]
     
  6. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    I'm working blind here, so I didn't notice the flare fitting nut at first. Now, of course, I need some flare wrenches, 'cause regular open-end wrenches don't do anything but round those nuts off. It is getting to the point where you need to be a double jointed circuis midget, muscled like Schwartzeneggar with eyeballs on your findertips to work on cars nowadays.
     
  7. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ..................Most likely , that nut will be either a 5\16's or a 3\8th's , which will be included on a single wrench . You....Don't have to purchase a whole set which will only be 3 wrench's at most . You shouldn't have to spend 5 or 6 bucks at most . fordy.. :)
     
  8. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    I know it is either 14mm or 9/16ths. Both are a very close fit.
     
  9. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    You think you're working blind....I have the same type of fuel filter on my Chevy pickup....except my filter is under the truck mounted to the inside of the suspension beam.

    If all else fails, grab the flare nut with a vise grips and turn the 3/4" nut with a wrench.

    I don't know if you're doing this....but, never use an adjustable wrench on any automotive nut or bolt.
     
  10. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    :bash: Well, the nut was 14mm, although I was able to get the 9/16th wrench on it. Did I mention that I couldn't see what I was doing? A 9/16th flare wrench will round off a 14mm nut. I didn't realize what I was doing until everuthing was nice and smooth on the nut. I was able to get a tubing cutter on the line to get the filter out. Now, I need to flare the line out, find a replacement flare nut, and flare out a short piece of 3/8 brake line so I can connect the two with a piece of rubber fuel line hose. Of course the nut is an oddball metric size that nobody local seems to cary. There is a warehouse that specializes in metric fasteners that I am going to try this afternoon. Of course they specialize in case lots, and don't deal much with single nuts. If that doesn't work, I'll have to go to a junkyard. :grump:
     
  11. cfabe

    cfabe Well-Known Member

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    Be careful using this method. It usually works okay on older cars that are carburated or throttle body injection becuase they only run maybe 15psi of fuel pressure, but newer cars all use port injection (and I'm assuming yours is 1996+ since it has a fuel tank pressure sensor which is normally an obd2 feature) and can run fuel pressures up to 60+ psi, which could cause a failure in this type or repair. The best way to do it is without using a piece of hose, but if you must use the hose, be sure to get high pressure fuel injection hose, not standard fuel hose.
     
  12. cfabe

    cfabe Well-Known Member

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    Oh and also you have to use the fuel injection style hose clamps, not the standard worm gear clamps with the slotted bands.
     
  13. mink

    mink Well-Known Member

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    if the other end of the fuel line is easily accessable ....you might be further ahead replacing the line
     
  14. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    The other end is easily accessible. However, the dealer is going to want several hundred dollars for a replacement fuel line, and I don't what to give them the satisfaction (see my previous post- I have had problems with this shop in the past. They won't admit it, and I can't prove it, but the czech engine light turned up AWOL while the car was in their care). Also, I do not have a lift, and would have to drop the fuel tank, so that would be the last thing I want to do.

    My mechanic said that if I put a double flare on what is left of the old line and the new line, I should not have any leaks. It worked with my old S-10, although it is TBI, so it probably does have less pressure.

    Right now, I am attempting to locate the flare nut that will connect the line to the new filter. The old nut was 14mm with a 1.5 pitch. Nobody around me caries metric flare fittings. Most shops that I wend to could not even identify the thread pitch. The metric fastener warehouse wouldn't even try to help me with this. I have tried to find what I am looking for at McMaster-Carr, but I have no idea *** I am looking for. I am about ready to give up on this as a bad idea and throw $1,000.00 at my mechanic to have him fix it. If nothing else, I could try a junkyard. The more I drive my truck, the more I spend on gasoline, so I need to get this resolved soon.
     
  15. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    I checked with Hyundai, and the fuel line only costs about 50 bux. It would be easier to have it towed to my mechanic and have him fix this mess rather than try to jerry rig the fuel line myself. Unfortunately, I'm not set up to do this work myself. With my luck, I'll spring a leak and wind up spraying fuel all over a hot engine. Can you say conflageration?