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When, oh when do we plant for fall brocolli and cabbage?? Some books say spring...other say mid summer. We are zone 6.
I have many many transplants of both to put out. We started them according one books info...but I am nervous to put them out in this heat.

So...for those who do these types of fall crops.....when do you plant inside, and when do you put out in the garden?

Christina
 

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I "had" 2 beautiful trays of fall cabbage I set out 2 weeks ago, I was told it would be ok if kept watered=however, no need to, bunnys loved it. I have 2 plants left.
 

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It somewhat depends on varieties. Some do well in the early slot...others are more for summer/fall harvest. The labels or catalog descriptions will give that information.
Also, some long season varieties can't be planted in summer, because they take so long to mature. Part depends on when your fall frost date is also.
Talk with you local coop ext and find out what varieties they recommend for your area, or talk with other local growers.
Ann
 

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If you do plant out, do it early in the morning and provide plenty of water. You might even want to provide shade for the first day or so.
 

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Here is the info provided by the Territorial Seed catalog - I think they do a nice job of providing general culture and cultivation information.

BROCCOLI: Culture
Brassica oleracea, Botrytis Group: Broccoli is sometimes called the luxury crop because it's so easy to grow and it has a million dollar taste. By planting several varieties with a sequence of maturity dates, you can have a continual harvest through late fall and even over winter into spring
CULTURE: When ranked with the rest of the cole crops, broccoli is generally the most vigorous and trouble free. However, it lacks tolerance to extreme heat, so early plantings are essential. Rough heads or leaves in the head are usually from heat-stressed young plants. Best started as transplants 6 weeks before last frost. Direct seed from April through mid-July. The biggest reason for a failure when direct seeding is soil crusting caused by uneven watering. Whether starting indoors or out, sow 1/4 inch deep. Keep the seedlings moist, and provide adequate nutrition. Optimum soil temperature range for germination: 55-75°F. Days to emergence: 5-17. Transplant out at 6 weeks or when there are 5 true leaves and the danger of a hard frost has passed. Space or thin to 12-24 inches between plants in rows 30 inches apart. Broccoli is a moderate feeder. For best results, work 1/4-1/2 cup of our blended organic fertilizer into the soil under each transplant. Avoid excessive nitrogen, as it will contribute to hollow stem. In general, cole crops are somewhat tolerant of acid soils, but liming to a pH of 6.0-6.8 will make the best use of the available nutrients.
INSECTS: Aphids, cabbage worms, flea beetles, and symphylans are generally the most troublesome. Refer to the culture boxes for Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, and Cauliflower for detailed control techniques.
DISEASE: The home gardener can help prevent viral and fungal broccoli diseases by practicing long crop rotations, using sterile starting mixes if transplanting, and practicing general sanitation procedures.
HARVEST: Before flower buds open, cut the central head at a 45° angle. Side shoots will form from the axillary buds and should be cut regularly to encourage production. Store at 40°F and 95% relative humidity.


CABBAGE: Culture
Brassica oleracea, Capitata Group: If you want a garden food supply you can depend on, cabbage is a must. Easy to grow and much sweeter than those bought in the grocery store. Our entire selection of spring, fall, and winter cabbage can be found on our website, at www.orderseed.com.
CULTURE: Cabbage is a hardy cool-season crop that does best under uniform cool, moist conditions. It can be direct sown or grown a transplant. Sow early cabbage types from March through June. Sow later autumn-maturing types from late May to early June. This allows the heads to form during the relative cool of the fall. Plant seed 1/4-1/2 inch deep. Optimum soil temperature range for best germination: 55-75°F. Days to emergence: 6-12. Soil crusting from uneven watering can lead to poor or sporadic germination. Outside, sow 5 seeds per foot; space transplants or thin to 18-24 inches apart in rows 2-4 feet apart. When transplanting, younger seedlings 6-8 weeks old with 5-6 true leaves are better able to tolerate adverse weather conditions. Sudden temperature changes or high applications of fertilizer at transplanting may result in poor head shape and reduced yields from non-headers. The preferred soil pH is 6.5, and 1-1 1/2 inches of water per week is required for uninterrupted growth. Fertility requirements for cabbages are relatively high. One and one-half to two cups of our blended organic fertilizer worked into the soil around each plant will provide the nutrition necessary for best production.
INSECTS: The first sign of cabbage worms will be white diamond-back moths fluttering close to the ground and over the plants. They lay eggs in the soil around the plants. These hatch into worms that can cause severe root and head damage. To control light infestations, spray plants with the bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis (BT) sold as Dipel. For heavy infestations, bait cabbage worms by mixing wheat bran into the above BT water solution until all water is absorbed by the bran. Add 1 tablespoon of molasses. Hand sprinkle or broadcast the bran mixture in and around the base of plants. Reapply as necessary. Cabbage worms, cabbage loopers, and cabbage root maggots all respond to this method. They can also be controlled by placing a physical barrier around each plant, such as a Reemay or AG-19 tent. This will prevent the female moths and flies from laying eggs on the leaves and stems. Aphids, flea beetles, and symphylans can also be troublesome. For information on how to control these garden pests, refer to the culture boxes for Brussels sprouts and Cauliflower.
DISEASE: The home gardener growing cabbage can prevent many cole crop diseases by practicing crop rotation, using sterile starting mixes, and adopting strict garden sanitation methods.
HARVEST: Early types mature fast and burst quickly, so they must be harvested promptly. Later types, maturing in late summer or autumn when growth rates are slow, will hold in the field for much longer, often several months. When cutting the heads from the stems, include two or three of the wrapper leaves to protect against bruising. Over-mature heads are subject to splitting, especially if they are exposed to moisture fluctuations. Successful storage starts with a good cultivar, free of diseases or injuries. Late storage types will keep for up to 6 months when kept at 32°F and at 98-100% relative humidity; early types will store for 1-2 months.
SEED SPECS: : Minimum germination standard: 75%. Usual seed life: 3 years. Add 25-35 days to time to maturity if direct seeding.
 

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I planted flat duth late cabbage in mid june. I'm zone 3 with mid september first frost date. The variety is about 100 day to harvest, so that's just about right for here.
 

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I usually start my fall brasiccas in early July and set them out about 3 weeks later. Keep them well watered and mulched.
 
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