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It is downright shameful how incredibly cheap household appliances are made these days. I bought a dehumidifier in 1984 that I used til this summer 2014 and I could not keep the fan running. Thirty years! So I bought another made by Danby in May and used it about 3 weeks longer than the 90 day warranty when it started leaking all over the place. At any rate, I will fix it, one way or another.

Made in 1984 - lasts 30 years. Used in 3 different homes and moved and stored countless times.
Made in 2014 - lasts 3 months. Fails while running in one location. Barely touched.
 

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I so totally agree. They are made to break. I had a 30-y-o dishwasher and replaced it due to aesthetics. It broke a month after the 2-yr warranty was up. Part replacement was nearly the price of a new one! It IS shameful! We now buy commercial grade and they last, although pricy.
 

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I can somewhat agree... Most things are being made a lot cheaper and are meant to be disposable. Thank us consumers who want cheap priced items for that.

If you spend a WHOLE lot of money for quality item, most times it will last. I no longer buy cheap tools. I stopped breaking them so much. I no longer buy cheap appliances. So far they have been lasting...

I'm sitting beside my Soleu sAir Dehumidifier right now... It's chugging along nicely. It's been running on continuous well over a year's worth of time... It was the more expensive unit on the market when I bought it..

There is a lot of truth in you get what you pay for... Just sad that you have to pay so much more today, compared to what you used to have to pay for quality years ago..
 
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We have gone through five dish washers, until I had him remove it and build me another cupboard.... We wash by hand now.
We have gone through four clothes washers in six years! I bought a hand plunger, a winger, and a clothes line!

My father found this - but won't sell it to me... LOL!

The more time marches by, the less I like the new advances!

ImageUploadedByHomesteading Today1411970428.415457.jpg
 

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My dryer, which was 20+ years old quit a year ago. I'm hanging clothes outside on a clothesline now.

The washer, 30 years old, died 2 months ago. We have a older washer in the cabin, bought 2nd hand, in the cabin so I'm using that until I can find a used one that will fit where it needs to go. I'm not buying new.

I had a toaster that I'd had for probably 15 years or more. Since I've been here in KY I've gone through three, bought new ... I'm now using the oven broiler to make my toast for breakfast, don't have a toaster any more.
 

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hhhmmm.. I do have to admit though... My 1920's Monitor Top GE Fridge is still kickin butt... My wife calls it old faithful because we've been through a few other fridges, and had to take the stuff out of them to keep in the old GE until we found another fridge.. That and when the power goes out, hat old GE stays a lot colder a lot longer than our modern fridges.. .That thing has saved us a lot in the last few years..
 

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We have gone through five dish washers, until I had him remove it and build me another cupboard.... We wash by hand now.
We have gone through four clothes washers in six years! I bought a hand plunger, a winger, and a clothes line!

My father found this - but won't sell it to me... LOL!

The more time marches by, the less I like the new advances!

View attachment 36935
I would love one of those!! I would also love to ditch our wasteful dishwasher. Unfortunately I know when it comes time to sell the future lookers would complain. Once we get into a place of our own - I won't own one. I may also not bring our W & D and just use the tubs. It's an upper body workout too..kills two birds with one stone!
 

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All depends on what you are talking about. Ever notice how long cars last today vs yesteryear? Not that long ago, in my view, if you had a car with 70K miles on it you were looking at a engine rebuild in your very near future. And having a running a car with over 100K on it was something to brag about. Heck odometers only had 5 digits back then.
 

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So true and it is not unheard of now of vehicles gong over 300K and with little maintenance done. And most of them with little to no work done on the engine itself. Tires around 100K and so on. Ya it wasn't that long ago that a vehicle got around 70K you would be looking at getting a Valve Job at the very least. Now you hardly ever hear about that being down and certainly not at that low milage.
 

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AGREE!

Oh my goodness. I see this every day. I have a 1975 GMC truck that I have driven for over thirty years and intend to drive for forty more! I know it will outlast my 2007 Ford Escape, which has been a very good vehicle but has too many things on it built to fail eventually.
I have several phones in my house, they range from a 1919 old crank phone (can't call out on that one) to a 1960's princess phone. All work great, I have bought a few cheap walmart phones that lasted a year and had to be replaced. Never again will I buy a new phone. I put in a rather expensive Delta faucet in my kitchen and within a year it needed parts replaced. The parts for one side of the faucet were 1/2 the price of the original faucet...and I would probably have to replace the other side in time. Seriously? Why should I be replacing parts in a year??? I am so tired of things not made to last. I make an effort to find vintage items for my house and farm. Large appliances, small appliances, phones so many things just are not well made.
 

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I have found that not only stuff made in the sixties, but made in Germany holds up pretty well. For example, my Yvonne was made in Germany in '63 and she is still purring right along. Gotta love that German engineering! :kiss:
 
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I have an old fridge that is a 1943 model, if I recall correctly. I need to put a new door gasket in it, but it was working up until I unplugged it. I miss my old Beer & Tater Fridge!
 

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Furniture is the same way. We are shopping around for a new living room set and I'm shocked at how terrible the quality is for the money. Unless you spend a small fortune, you're paying for upholstered OSB and staples. I know furniture is one of those investments that pay off but even my $2000 sectional (that wasn't super amazing by any means) only lasted 5 years before it started coming apart. Of course, that was after the warranty expired. :\
 

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Agree on the cheap furniture. Nothing but sawdust and glue. It makes me wonder where the stuff made of real, solid wood is going. About 18 years or so ago, I found a real bargain at a big furniture store in Birmingham. They had two dressers remaining on the floor unsold out of a line of furniture they were no longer carrying.

I went over to look at them, and immediately bought both. These dressers were solid rock maple. No fake wood. Immensely heavy, about six feet long, with mirror. I bought one for Mom and one for me. The markdown price to get rid of each one was ......$150.00......from a retail price of $1209.95. The line was called "Crossroads" by Broyhill. I couldn't believe my luck.

I have the old telephone desk that Mama and Daddy had in the house when I was a kid. It is solid wood throughout, even the drawer. Graceful curves on the legs, and beautiful styling over all. I imagine they only paid probably $5.00 for it back in the ancient days of the '40's.

Also, I have one wooden kitchen chair that was left in an outbuilding. It is very basic, slats for the seat, ladder back style. We had a full set that went with the wooden kitchen table. It is sturdy, thick wood. If this were copied by the Chinese, it would be thin and flimsy and would not last a year, being made of sawdust and glue pressed and formed.

Also in my possession are a few of Mama's clothes pins from those times. They are thick, the steel spring is thick and strong, the pins themselves are wider and longer than the imitations of now.

I lament the passing of quality in all our manufactured goods. Quick, dirty, and cheap are the bywords now.
 

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Wendy, that is some table.

Oh, the clothespins. A few years ago, while travelling west, we stopped at a flea market, just for a break. I managed to find two big bags of older clothespins - amazing the difference.

Oh, and that washing machine brings back memories. My Grandmother had a Maytag like that, but it was gasoline powered. It had a foot pedal thingey (can't think of what to call it) that started the motor.
 

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For me, can openers are the world's WORST!! I can't TELL you how many I've gone through, some of them coming out of the box not working. So my mom found - by some miracle, and I can't remember where - an old antique one that mounts to the table or wall, in two peices and it has worked like a charm ever since I started using it! No one is allowed to touch it, lol.

Stacey~
 

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Part of it is that materials are not so cheaply available any more so reducing the amount of these is important to making a profit. Also shipping weight is important where everything is made far, far away.

I disagree that cars are that much more durable. They certainly are lighter and more perfectly run by computers so have less immediate issues and wear but are almost impossible to fix economically where old cars were almost indefinitely repairable. I hope that my 20 year old truck will out last me.
 
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