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Are they still out there?? I brought home a beautiful mare earlier this month. She is 25 years old and very old style, big stocky body, good muscles and most importantly, nice big feet! I am absolutely in love with this mare.
She is calm, easy to work with and considering her age and that she has had 13 foals that we know of, she is in incredible shape. Put her next to my more modern, pleasure Quarter Horse mare, a young ten year old that is four leg lame right now and will always have issues with her feet (guess why!) and I just can't understand why they let that old style go. Are there any of that old bulldog style Quarter Horses left?? Any suggestions on where to look. I know Niki will only be able to work for so much longer and is at the end of her lifespan. She may still be with us for many more years (I really hope so) but I would like to find something like her in a younger package as well. Suggestions??
Here is a link to her pedigree. http://www.allbreedpedigree.com/ind...S+NIKI+LYNN&g=5&cellpadding=0&small_font=1&l=

This is her


 

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People who don't like the modern type QH, have created the Foundation Quarter Horse Association. Horse has to carry a certain percentage of old blood, no Impressive breeding, not sure if they all "have the look" of old style QHs. Or the better feet. Having ridden a LOT of old style QHs when they were to ONLY style, they were darn rough gaited except when cantering. A lot of the Foundation folks participate in the Ranch Horse competitions, roping, reining, cutting, working Stockhorse, etc.

However, with so many animals being VERY inbred to get those percentages, you would want to get a prospective purchase tested for the new inherited diseases like HERDA and others. Inbreeding does have those "bad" genes appear more easily. At this point, I would get ANY new QH purchase checked for these genetic diseases, not just HYPP. More diseases appearing each year, with those close genetics in all breeds with QH in them.
 

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Three bars...king...Leo...hard twist. Gotta read the papers. Then find you a ranch that cares more about performance than show. The trouble with impressive was they didn't care who he bred...and he stood cheap. Lessened rather than gained his legacy.
 

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And Goodhors, that first horse I posted a picture of had a trot that was smooth as glass. There wasn't even a bounce to her extended trot.
 

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You can still find them, although as Teej said, they are easier to find in the west where they still have cattle ranches that require working horses and not show horses.

Look at the pedigrees ... the extended pedigrees ... and know what lines you want and which ones to stay away from.
 

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I have a few that are old line bred. Sadly, my two favorite QH stallions are the two that ushered in Impressive Syndrome and HERDA. I try to stay away from Impressive lines, but Poco Bueno doesn't always equate to HERDA, so I have a few Poco Bueno bred horses, but I don't breed them and won't.

I do have some lovely old QH lines though. Sir Quincy Dan, Sonny Dee Bar, Skipper, King, Leo. Mostly all on my gelding, but one of my big mares is foundation bred, though not 100 percent. If I could ever get a photo to download, I would post them! Here is a link to my gelding, you can see his pedigree on allbreedpedigreequery, his registered name is Pocos lucky cider. Here is his pic...

<iframe src="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15290986878/player/f9dfde78e1" height="364" width="500" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>
 

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Having ridden a LOT of old style QHs when they were to ONLY style, they were darn rough gaited except when cantering. A lot of the Foundation folks participate in the Ranch Horse competitions, roping, reining, cutting, working Stockhorse, etc..
So has the roughest trot. It is impossible for me to sit it. I didn't know that was common with them.
 

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It took me close to 2 years to find my gelding but during that time, I did find there are still people breeding old style QH's. The best places to find them are usually areas with a concentration of working ranches.

Unfortunately, buying a finished ranch horse is usually fairly expensive.
 

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Well, though your present horses used to day may be listed as Foundation, or now look "bulldog", many have a lot of TB in them, which I think improved the gaits. Maybe some folks bred for BETTER gaits, since then.

Those horses back "in the old days" were built as they were, many with short pasterns, upright shoulders, which gave them the pounding trot when you were not going as slow as possible. They had Draft blood in them for size, bone, often other breeds that were not tracked, so their builds came from undocumented animals of misc. breeding, but accepted into the QH registry by their looks. Early showing QHs came from this background and then produced more of themselves as time went on. The outcrossing with TB gained speed, better flexibility, helped with longer pasterns, shoulder angles in getting better gaits. I would believe that a number of those Foundation Horses would be laughed out of the QH ring now, just SO different than what you see in QHs today with big feet, plain heads, short necks.

The present "slower than slow, trot in place" ring gait, is not a new phenomena. VERY common in earlier times of QH or Western horse showing, so riders were not bouncing in their western saddles thru the classes. Those horses DID have great walks, huge overstride each step, which was a big bonus to folks in the saddle all day in getting places. Canters also were pretty good, though often kept quite slow, for comfort again, especially pretty in the show ring not tearing around the other horses.

The super slow gaits changed over to Judges wanting "normal" looking gaits, not speedy, but FORWARD in the show ring. That lasted for 15-20 years, now back to the hardly moving horses in QH shows, because folks can't really ride, gaits can STILL be rough, and Judges have been trained to think "Slow equals well-trained" instead of being lame as so many QHs are now. QH has had to make Rules asking for Forward Progress in classes! Have two Canters, one has to SHOW FORWARD now, and SHOULD be asked for in the classes.

Glad some folks have smooth horses at the Trot, surely is the gait most useful in a long day riding.
 

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Well, though your present horses used to day may be listed as Foundation, or now look "bulldog", many have a lot of TB in them, which I think improved the gaits. Maybe some folks bred for BETTER gaits, since then.

Those horses back "in the old days" were built as they were, many with short pasterns, upright shoulders, which gave them the pounding trot when you were not going as slow as possible. They had Draft blood in them for size, bone, often other breeds that were not tracked, so their builds came from undocumented animals of misc. breeding, but accepted into the QH registry by their looks. Early showing QHs came from this background and then produced more of themselves as time went on. The outcrossing with TB gained speed, better flexibility, helped with longer pasterns, shoulder angles in getting better gaits. I would believe that a number of those Foundation Horses would be laughed out of the QH ring now, just SO different than what you see in QHs today with big feet, plain heads, short necks.

The present "slower than slow, trot in place" ring gait, is not a new phenomena. VERY common in earlier times of QH or Western horse showing, so riders were not bouncing in their western saddles thru the classes. Those horses DID have great walks, huge overstride each step, which was a big bonus to folks in the saddle all day in getting places. Canters also were pretty good, though often kept quite slow, for comfort again, especially pretty in the show ring not tearing around the other horses.

The super slow gaits changed over to Judges wanting "normal" looking gaits, not speedy, but FORWARD in the show ring. That lasted for 15-20 years, now back to the hardly moving horses in QH shows, because folks can't really ride, gaits can STILL be rough, and Judges have been trained to think "Slow equals well-trained" instead of being lame as so many QHs are now. QH has had to make Rules asking for Forward Progress in classes! Have two Canters, one has to SHOW FORWARD now, and SHOULD be asked for in the classes.

Glad some folks have smooth horses at the Trot, surely is the gait most useful in a long day riding.
My gelding has a very natural slow, smooth trot, though he was never trained for it. It came very naturally to him and he picked it up on his own the day I first saddled and rode him, I didn't train it into him.

Sadly, that beautify boy of mine was kicked in his left hock 3 years ago. It fractured the cartilage in the hock, but when he was kicked his leg went underneath him sideways and it also broke his pelvis. He is a very lovely, well kept and much loved pasture pal at this point. Since the day he was kicked, he can not even able to be sat upon by anyone, no matter how light the rider. His lovely, slow trot will never be used. It wouldn't have been in a Western Pleasure ring anyway, he was a brilliant Reiner.

Seems you have a dislike for Quarter horses? Too bad, there are some really great, sound minded, level headed Quarter horses out there that are not only delightful to own and ride, but are as sturdy and willing as any breed could be. I am blessed to have several in my barn, both tall and small, Cutters, Reiners, and yes, a couple western pleasure/halter type show quality QH's. I also have Mustangs, an Appendix, 2 Paints, and several TB's, as well as a huge Friesian/TB cross filly coming 2 in February that is delightful. I don't ride Western Pleasure on any of them, but many have a very nice slow trot, can be collected in a slow lope, and at times, love a good run for the fun of it.

I have had horses for more than 40 years. I will always love my solid, sound, pounding trot or smooth trot, QH's:), but I will always love my others as well. I have only one breed I really prefer to never own, and I won't say which it is here because it would cause a stir. Suffice to say, my guys are what they are, smooth or bumpy doesn't matter. They get the job done and I am happy with that.
 

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What use is a "smooth trot" when the horse breaks down at 8 years old and can only be ridden with joint injections or has chronic foot problems from having feet so darn small they fit in my pony's shoes?

Niki has a very smooth gait and is quiet and even tempered. Frankly I find thoroughbreds to be way too sensitive and not as hardy as a good working Quarter Horse. It seems breeders now a days are breeding form over function. I think that is grits backwards myself. If I wanted a thoroughbred I would have one. I have no desire to have one.

I could care less about the worthless, broken down, small footed garbage they now call show horses. They are a joke. They last a couple years before their body rebels against its very design. Give me a good using horse, one that can do the job I ask of it and can still pack my big ol' butt around when most horses have been buried for 10 years or more. Any horse can have an ok jog but if you can't sit a rougher trot then you don't know how to ride. No sense blaming the horse because you are lazy. I have ridden a lot of different horses over the years and a lot of different breeds, cross outs and what not and I have had all kinds of trots to sit to. Some were down right awful but sorry, they didn't come from the ranch horses or the older style Quarters, they came from the appendix crosses and the thoroughbreds. And one really nasty pony but that is another thread.

Point is I would rather have a long lasting, well tempered, easy riding but rough trotted Quarter Horse than some of the smoothest broken down, lunatic, bad mannered "show" horses I have had the displeasure of dealing with. Every breed has good and bad but most of the horses I have found to be unfailingly reliable and hard riding we without fail something with ranch or old style Quarter Horse close up or entirely in the family tree.

I think I will save my pennies and go find a good finished ranch horse. If you have some ranches the you can recommend wr I would be ever so grateful!
 

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What use is a "smooth trot" when the horse breaks down at 8 years old and can only be ridden with joint injections or has chronic foot problems from having feet so darn small they fit in my pony's shoes?

Niki has a very smooth gait and is quiet and even tempered. Frankly I find thoroughbreds to be way too sensitive and not as hardy as a good working Quarter Horse. It seems breeders now a days are breeding form over function. I think that is grits backwards myself. If I wanted a thoroughbred I would have one. I have no desire to have one.

I could care less about the worthless, broken down, small footed garbage they now call show horses. They are a joke. They last a couple years before their body rebels against its very design. Give me a good using horse, one that can do the job I ask of it and can still pack my big ol' butt around when most horses have been buried for 10 years or more. Any horse can have an ok jog but if you can't sit a rougher trot then you don't know how to ride. No sense blaming the horse because you are lazy. I have ridden a lot of different horses over the years and a lot of different breeds, cross outs and what not and I have had all kinds of trots to sit to. Some were down right awful but sorry, they didn't come from the ranch horses or the older style Quarters, they came from the appendix crosses and the thoroughbreds. And one really nasty pony but that is another thread.

Point is I would rather have a long lasting, well tempered, easy riding but rough trotted Quarter Horse than some of the smoothest broken down, lunatic, bad mannered "show" horses I have had the displeasure of dealing with. Every breed has good and bad but most of the horses I have found to be unfailingly reliable and hard riding we without fail something with ranch or old style Quarter Horse close up or entirely in the family tree.

I think I will save my pennies and go find a good finished ranch horse. If you have some ranches the you can recommend wr I would be ever so grateful!
I was agreeing with you:) I have a lot of rough trotting, teeth rattling QH's, and I wouldn't trade one of them for any fancy show horse. I was simply responding to the post about QH's rough trots, saying I have one that has a natural smooth, slow trot. He was not trained for it or bred for it. It was just the way he was.

Anyway, I hear ya. My horses work my ranch first, then they are maybe able to play in the ring:)
 

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What use is a "smooth trot" when the horse breaks down at 8 years old and can only be ridden with joint injections or has chronic foot problems from having feet so darn small they fit in my pony's shoes?

Niki has a very smooth gait and is quiet and even tempered. Frankly I find thoroughbreds to be way too sensitive and not as hardy as a good working Quarter Horse. It seems breeders now a days are breeding form over function. I think that is grits backwards myself. If I wanted a thoroughbred I would have one. I have no desire to have one.

I could care less about the worthless, broken down, small footed garbage they now call show horses. They are a joke. They last a couple years before their body rebels against its very design. Give me a good using horse, one that can do the job I ask of it and can still pack my big ol' butt around when most horses have been buried for 10 years or more. Any horse can have an ok jog but if you can't sit a rougher trot then you don't know how to ride. No sense blaming the horse because you are lazy. I have ridden a lot of different horses over the years and a lot of different breeds, cross outs and what not and I have had all kinds of trots to sit to. Some were down right awful but sorry, they didn't come from the ranch horses or the older style Quarters, they came from the appendix crosses and the thoroughbreds. And one really nasty pony but that is another thread.

Point is I would rather have a long lasting, well tempered, easy riding but rough trotted Quarter Horse than some of the smoothest broken down, lunatic, bad mannered "show" horses I have had the displeasure of dealing with. Every breed has good and bad but most of the horses I have found to be unfailingly reliable and hard riding we without fail something with ranch or old style Quarter Horse close up or entirely in the family tree.

I think I will save my pennies and go find a good finished ranch horse. If you have some ranches the you can recommend wr I would be ever so grateful!
Most Quarter Horses today have some TB blood. Three Bars, one of the great Quarter Horse sires, was actually a registered Thoroughbred. The input of the TB on early Quarter Horses was a good one, in my opinion. ETA: Eighteen of the first nineteen registration numbers assigned to horses in vol. I of the American Quarter Horse Stud Book were saved for living horses that had proved themselves as outstanding sires of offspring of Quarter Horse type. Examination of the pedigrees of these horses indicates that many of them carried in excess of 50 per cent of Thoroughbred breeding, and only a very few of them did not carry some known Thoroughbred breeding rather close up in their pedigrees. From: http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/horses/quarter/

In fact, I'll go on to say that AQHA's epic failure was closing the book too early. That's why there are the genetic problems HERDA, MH, GBED, PSSM, and LWS. Most, if not all, are also rampant in Paints and Appaloosas. There shouldn't be a LWS problem in Apps but it still occurs.

The manner that AQHA dealt with the Impressive/HYPP problem is why I'll loathe them until my last breath. That problem could have have been stopped in it's tracks within a decade, at most, if Impressive and any horse that was n/h was banned from breeding. AQHA was, and still is, all about the money in my opinion, and a great breed suffers because of their greed.
 
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Look for horses of the Hancock line. These are big powerful thick built horses that can go all day. My Shooter was a hancock bred mare...not the prettiest thing in the pasture but built like a tank. Hancocks DO have a rep for being a bit bronky but mine was as level headed and easy going as they come. you can see a pic of her here http://fetherhd.deviantart.com/art/Big-Gals-314657736
 

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Look for horses of the Hancock line. These are big powerful thick built horses that can go all day. My Shooter was a hancock bred mare...not the prettiest thing in the pasture but built like a tank. Hancocks DO have a rep for being a bit bronky but mine was as level headed and easy going as they come. you can see a pic of her here http://fetherhd.deviantart.com/art/Big-Gals-314657736
I have a coming 3 year old Hancock bred gelding. Really sweet, level guy, big and stocky, rough as all get out! But he will be a phenomenal roper. Not bronky at all, thankfully, but yes, I have heard that as well.
 
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