Old hound dog on the side of the road..

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by oz in SC, Jan 27, 2005.

  1. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    On my way to work these last two days there has been a hound dog in the same place on the side of the road(not near the road but easily seen).

    Yesterday I turned around and went back to see if I could do anything but he wouldn't come close but did seem relatively tame...

    So last night AFTER work I stopped and he was there still....no luck getting close to him.

    TODAY he was STILL in the same spot,he seems a little friendlier(wages his tail) but is still stand off-ish.

    I went back later in the afternoon(it is good to be in charge :D )with some scraps and he was STILL there,put the food in a container I brought and he quickly ate it all up..

    On my way home stoped and gave him more scraps and he seems to NOT want to leave that corner.

    I guess I am wondering if there is anything to do??

    No real animal control in that county and in MY county hound/hunting dogs are immediately put down...

    We do not want another dog but there are a few private shelters around...

    I am a very soft touch for animals in distress... :)
     
  2. Cosmic

    Cosmic Well-Known Member

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    Try the old dog getting tricks.

    Bring the food, put the bowl down where you did before, sit down say 4 feet away and totally ignore him. Don't look at him, look down at the ground. Be extremely patient. Maybe bring water too, put the water a little closer to you than the food.

    Probably will come and eat, maybe a bit wary, but work his way up to it. After eating, if you don't pay attention, will get curious and maybe move in for a sniff. If you make no motion or appear to be a threat can be buddies. If he will let you talk to him, will eventually let you touch him. Can just get hold of the collar or slip a leash over that you brought and are hiding.

    Always remain sitting down and at his level, better yet lying down propped up on an elbow is even better. Never put your hand out with the fingers down toward him. Hand down on the ground are good.

    Bringing another very tame dog that is very controllable by you works too. Hold you dog in close to you. Let him come to the other dog which you pet, talk to and fuss over, never look directly in his direction. Will come easy. A trick I use to catch other people's run away dogs they are trying to get back on a leash and will not come when called. Works everytime. My dog will do as commanded. I pet her and let the run away come to her and is an easy grab.

    Who knows why he is that location but he is giving it some importance.
     

  3. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

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    The newspaper here will put lost and found pet ads in for free. Maybe he got lost from his owner and is waiting to be picked up.
     
  4. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

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    Those of us who hunt hounds out here for the most part dont want anyone to pick up our dogs, andthe dogs know it, if you can get within 6 feet of one of them outside our properties then you are either pretty special or the dogs know you fairly well.

    Most hound dogs will come back to the place where they were turned out on a track for the most part if you lose them or they lose the track.... it is probably why the hound is still there.....

    If you do catch him he most likely has a collar on with his owners name and phone, and here we add the words DO NOT PICK UP just in case someone gets to a dog before we do..... and most of the time we get there within a day or so if we lose one..... my cousin put 1000 miles on his truck looking for a really good dog that got off track and never did find her.... so its not like we dont look.... and the part about returning to the turnout spot dont always happen either if the dog runs for a couple 3 days. Some folks i run with years ago lost a pair of dogs that they seen biting a walking bear out of a canyon, 30 days later they came made their way home, about 45 miles from the turnout.

    But if you can get our hands on the dog and can see a phone number then call the owners and most likely they will come get the hound..... feeding it isnt the right thing either.... but i would probly do the same in your place so no one can fault you for that...... you have more heart than 99.99% of people i know where hounds are concerned.

    William
     
  5. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Why, that's down right republican of you oz! Takin' care of those in neednall.

    Many years ago, I'd been in town getting a snootful and got dropped off at the end of my driveway. I carefully made my way up the snowy track in the dark and felt my way towards the porch when what I was certain was a bear let out with a growl.

    I didn't even pause to figure out what that slippery feeling in my drawers was, I beat feet for the back door of the cabin. Once inside I unleashed the blunderbuss and a flashlight and kicked the door open to meet my newest neighbor. This poor, skinny pathetic lookin' hounddog sat there wagging his tail, meek as could be.

    Even though hound hunting was pretty popular in the area, I didn't know any hound hunters at the time. To me the thing looked absolutely starved, his belly was sticking to his backbone. The only thing I had to feed it was a pot of beans simmering on the woodstove so I offered that. Figured he'd figure out on his own that they were hot but it didn't phase him.

    No collar, no animal control, the neighbors didn't know anything about him. He hung out on the porch for a few days begging for more beans. When the weekly paper came out, his owner was looking and came right out when I called.

    He'd been couger hunting a couple drainages over and this younger dog got separated and ended up here. I asked if all his dogs were that skinny, and he explained that he liked to keep 'em hungry.

    Over the years, I've come to know quite a few houndsmen and their dogs and while we don't always see eye to eye for several reasons, most of them really do care for their dogs a lot. This particular owner had a the worst reputation around for the care of his animals and ethics.

    He wasn't any too happy that I'd fed his dog all those beans either!
     
  6. Ozarks_1

    Ozarks_1 Well-Known Member

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    If the dog's not friendly, there's probably not much you can -or should - do.

    A few years ago, I got one of my dogs because she was dropped off at the top of the hill just up the road from us (a common drop off spot for unwanted animals). After I noticed her hanging around for a few days, I took her some dog food - and we got along immediately. I took her home - and she was one of the best dogs I've ever had. ("Was" - she liked tires and mud flaps too much and grabbed one wrong one day.)
    I recently noticed another dog had been dropped off in the same location, so I went to feed it. It didn't want to be friendly at all. That's fine with me ... BUT if it comes around the place, I've got a rifle and a backhoe.
    I don't put up with stray dogs on the place ... lost a whole bunch of chickens and a goat to them over the years. Most of the chicken-killers still had a mouthful of feathers when I shot them.
     
  7. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    Well he is still there,sits by the side of a road intersection just in the woods.
    I bought some dog food and fed him today,also brought some water.

    He is VERY skinny but looks okay otherwise.

    Unfortunately,I will not be back out there until Tuesday.

    Around here the dogs are used to hunt deer.

    Deer season ended on the first I believe.

    Well I can't really do much more.

    Thanks for the advice.
     
  8. Pops2

    Pops2 Well-Known Member

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    not a big fan of deer doggers. i have only known two that took good care of their dogs & put any effort into them. interestingly one ran rabbit beagles & the other ran pound puppies.
    anyway most don't use tracking collars, don't run the dogs until opening day, and don't make any effort to find them. most other dog hunters put A LOT of effort into care, training, exercise & will bust their @$$ to find them.
     
  9. cathyharrell

    cathyharrell Well-Known Member

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    Years ago my youngest son brought home a pretty young black and tan hound dog. It was during hunting season. We never did find out who she belonged to. I took her to the vet and got her spayed. He said, "Looks like a full blood black and tan coon hound. Oh well, it's too late now." I told him I didn't care I just wanted her fixed.

    I hope the dog finds a home.
     
  10. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    i say lure him into the truck and save him from a life of torment....
     
  11. dreadstalker

    dreadstalker Well-Known Member

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    my mom rescued a dog in much the same manner a few yrs 7 or 8? back.take your time and try to stay awhile each time you are there.the dog will need to get used to you and your scent.if you hurry the process along you will most likely scare the dog .it has to learn to trust you and equate your scent with positive times.BTW my momm still has that dog and it is her shadow
     
  12. Jeff-n-Deb

    Jeff-n-Deb Member

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    We are coon hunters, and we have 4 bluetick hounds. I can tell you that the vast majority of coon hunters take very good care of their hounds as we do also. Ours are probably a little over weight right now as we give them extra feed during the cold winter months. They have a clean dry place to sleep, are "messed" with on a daily basis, and by that I mean we don't just go out and dump the feed and turn away, we play around with them, put our hands on them and check them for any abnormalities, make sure they have clean water and plenty of it. And yes during the winter that can mean going out as many as 4 times a day to knock the ice out and give more water. 90 percent of the other hunters we know do the same for their dogs. We are not activist, we simply give back to our dogs the joy that they give to us, if you have never been coon hunting then you are missing a wonder of nature! It is simply the best. Does it put food on the table? no, but it is our form of entertainmnet.
    A coon hunter that does not take care of a hound is just a dog jockey in my books, to us our dogs are an investment. You get out of it what you put in to it.
     
  13. Pops2

    Pops2 Well-Known Member

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    Jeff-n-Deb
    what do you mean it doesn't put food on the table? are you feeding them to the dogs?
    i haven't tried them myself but have been told by one of my bear hunting friends to stick them in a roasting bag w/ some herbs & potatoes and let em go until the meat falls off the bone.