Old Highland Cow needs retirement home.

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Dr.Rory, Feb 14, 2005.

  1. Dr.Rory

    Dr.Rory New Member

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    Feb 14, 2005
    Location:
    NY - upstate
    I would like to adopt a placid old Highland cow.
    We have enough pasture,skills and facilities to take care of 2 or 3 old cows that need TLC and some medical care. I have the expectation that the cow will be more compliant than some of my human patients :)). We already have pigs,fowl and a cow-friendly dog.
    If you know of an old cow that may be culled because she is ailing please contact me ,that I may give her a few extra years of comfortable retirement.
    Of course you can inspect her new home and visit too!
    Thank you.
     
  2. lilsassafrass

    lilsassafrass Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    ohio
    Thing is ,
    Highlands in my experience tend not to ail much, and I have delt with some pretty old highlands , my oldest on the farm ever was 29 when she passed had a calf at her side , and was in calf when she died, her skull hangs in my dining room.Just last month I lost one that was 20 , usually I just cull them out and put them in the freezer if they start getting creaky or non productive. but they very rarely ail. And I think thats the way most of the older cows go for most breeders unless we find some one who is just starting out breeding , and doesnt mind taking on a few aged cows to start their operation with which can be an inexpensive way to go.
    I do have a few older cows, I would like to retire you are more than welcome to come take a look at them , I am down in Ohio,I would give you a good price!

    Paula
    Hyde Park Farm
     

  3. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    You can likely go to your local livestock auction and pick up all of the old cull cows you can handle. I seen some sell for less than the auction fees when they had a problem, such as a cancer eye, as they were slated for the pet food market. If you can't attend on a regular basis make arrangements with the auctioneer or an order buyer to look on your behalf.

    I assume you are interested in the Highlands due to their winter coat. I suspect if you do a Google search you can find a Highlands associations in NY.
     
  4. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    I am near Jefferson/St Lawrence county's . I have probally only seen 6 highlands go thru auction in 5 years. Sorry I cannot help you.
     
  5. Dr.Rory

    Dr.Rory New Member

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    Location:
    NY - upstate
    Paula,
    Thank you for being so kind to give my proposal some thought.
    When things quieten down with the human patients in a few days ,I'd like to arrange (off-list) to call you if I may.
    Although these Highland lassies are so long lived physicaly, do they tend to exhibit dementia or other signs of senility? 29 is really a grand age and be nursing and pregnant - a tribute to the care you were providing.
    Thanks also to others who contributed their suggestions. They are much appreciated.
     
  6. lilsassafrass

    lilsassafrass Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    ohio
    You are more than welcome to give me a call
    but I might suggest as you are in New York , you might do a google search and key in AHCA .. you will bring up the national web pages , on there you will find breeder listings by state, you may find some one much closer to you than Ohio.
    New york has a large number of breeders some of the folks I know are very sentimental about their cows.

    Keep in mind as well, as you are looking at the site what kind of handling facilities you have. Although highlands can be very gentle and easy going by nature , if they wern't accustomed to being handled when they were young and were subsequently flighty and/or ill natured then, they arent going to get any better with age,add to that that their weapons to show displeasure only get larger and sharper (I swear some of mine actually sharpen them on rocks out inthe pasture !!! ) You will want to make sure that the individuals you aquire are good tempered and will go on a halter so you can restrain them if needful.Its not easy to get those old individuls into a crush for doctoring, standard crushes just dont work well for highlands , ohh they can be used .. mine is standard but you need lots and lots of patience to let them manuver through the head gates .. and it absolutly wont work if they are frightened , mad and panicky ....do not let that discourage you from your search there are gentle old souls out there!
     
  7. Dr.Rory

    Dr.Rory New Member

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    Location:
    NY - upstate
    Paula,
    Thank you for your thoughtful advice.
    I was rather concerned about the length of the journey from Ohio to upstate NY for these old ladies. I would have to find a bovine B&B enroute for them to stretch their legs and rest from the vibration and noise of a cattle trailer.
    Thanks also for the caution about handling them. That is why I mentioned in my original post "placid" . You mean my bedside manner may not work on these old ladies?:))
    Hopefully someone in New York state may contact me as you suggest.
    Thank you for your help,
    Dr. Rory.
     
  8. Unisus1

    Unisus1 New Member

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    Feb 25, 2005
    Hey Dr. Rory,

    I'm a Cornell student named Amy... a senior this year... and for the past two years, I've participated in a three-week livestock show. On a whim, I thought I'd show beef heifers, which were big wonderful slobbery girls... over the three weeks, I watched them learn to trust humans and give so much of themselves to being shown, even though they didn't really understand what was going on... each cow sort of bonded with its shower to a greater or lesser degree.

    One heifer in particular, an ugly little thing I named Cannoli whose nose looked like she'd just walked into the side of a barn, was particularly intelligent and full of personality. I was able to show her, and she gave me so much of herself... she was asked to go out three times in the ring, which was so much more than she was up for, and she was frothing by the time she was finished, but did SO well and pulled a first-place ribbon (she'd somehow picked up voice cues over those three weeks... "Step up" made her walk and "Ho" got her to stop). I cried over that cow when it was time to send her back to the Teaching and Research barn, where she will possibly calve, and then certainly go to slaughter. The last time I saw her was the first time she'd gentled enough to let me sit beside her in the straw. She could be so loving and trusting and intelligent... the thought of her going to slaughter just kills me. I sat there crying over her before I left, and she looked at me with those big, deep amber eyes...... :(

    I know it's reaching, but if I were to purchase this particular heifer (she would be three years old now... not an old cow, I know), is there any way you'd be able to let her live out her years in a pasture with other animals? The second cow I showed, River, is another Angus whom I would love to see find a home as a pet and I'd gladly purchase her for you too if you had room for them both or need a companion for Cannoli. The cows are both currently in a research facility near Cornell University in Ithaca, NY.

    Thanks for your time and reading, and good luck finding cows to save... you have a great heart to do it :)

    Sincerely, Amy Barroll, aeb46@cornell.edu
     
  9. QueenB04

    QueenB04 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Virginia
    Our friends/husband's boss and his wife own Scottish Highland Cattle in Farmville Virginia. I can't get the link up right now but I will post it for you. I don't know about older ones, however they do have some pets. I'll send the link when I get it to work.