Old Barn

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by city_grown, Dec 28, 2005.

  1. city_grown

    city_grown Active Member

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    Union County, NC
    Any suggestions on what I could do. It doesn't seem like it will fall in anytime soon. Years of just having renters or nobody at the farm and me never thinking I would want to move to the country. The middle seems to be the only rotten part.





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  2. brosil

    brosil Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't know if it's nationwide but there is a group called Barns Again that can help with specialized contractors for barn restoration. At least, you might be able to afford a survey of it to determine if it's really worth saving.
     

  3. Sammy

    Sammy Well-Known Member

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    Save it if you can. They just don't build them like they use to.
     
  4. bachelorb

    bachelorb Well-Known Member

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    Anderson, Alabama
    It depends where you live. I've shored up an old barn at a place I've just bought. The problem down here is termites. I need to replace all the corner posts and some sills. Its not that expensive, just time consuming. I found an old foundation under mine, but over the years, the dirt built up around it allowing the termites to attack.
    Barn

    If your foundation is good, and the load bearing walls are not rotted, I'd just put a steep pitched gable roof on it. If you have timber around there, you can usually find a local sawyer with a portable mill that could saw up everything you need to fix it for under $250.00 ( at $.17 per board foot).

    I have found that for the most part, buildings like this look worse then they really are.
     
  5. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    i would look into fixing it but first things first! get a tarp over the roof and start sabilizing the walls! do not remove debris till you are sure the walls will not cave in. there are many barn rebuilding contractors , depends on where you are and what you can spend.
     
  6. Highground

    Highground Well-Known Member

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    Seein as yer in NC, I'd check and see if it's made of Chestnut. If it is, it's worth a bundle of money.
     
  7. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    It's definitely a dangerous undertaking to rebuild a barn like that before checking it out thoroughly for soundness. Have it checked by a professional if you aren't sure and get their recommendations.
     
  8. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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  9. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

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    there are folks and places that pay very good money for old barn wood if yours cannot be repaired. maybe you can make enough money to build a smaller barn?
     
  10. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    I would save it. You need to get the thing covered to keep the rain out of the barn, or you will lose the whole thing.
    I don't think it will cost all that much to fix and repair, especially if you use a sheet metal roof.
    If you are wanting to research repairing this barn on the internet, might try Barn Again!, and timber framing.
    These old barns need to be saved...we are losing them at a frightening pace.
    clove
     
  11. Sammy

    Sammy Well-Known Member

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    Agree 100%...... I'm helping Michigan State U. do a Barn Survey. Have to take a pic and put info. such as type of roof, material, support buildings so on and so forth.
     
  12. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A short way past Oddville
    I've taken down a couple, reuse the old wood to put up buildings on my place. From the looks of your picture that is about all I'd do with that one, pull it down and salvage the bits that are still sound. The rafters are gone, the haymow probably still had hay in it when the roof went so the joists for the haymow rotted. You might be able to salvage some of the wall posts, the ones down the center row are questionable. Maybe save most of the wall girts. If the wall boxing is not worn too thin you can probably turn it so the weathered side is "in" and get some years out of it. The posts you salvage can have the end trimmed, set on a good base if the old has shifted. It is possible to straighten the frame if it's racked, replace missing roof rafters, replace rotten floor joists and flooring. It would depend on the posts conditions. If they are eaten/rotted on the bottom, pull it down and rebuild it. Either way that barn still has some good years left in it.
     
  13. Columbia,SC.

    Columbia,SC. Thats MR. Redneck to you

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    Looking at the outside pics everything looks pretty plumb and level. Looking at the inside pics. I think the walls seem to lean inside, but that is probably due to a wide angle lense on the camera to show the whole interior. This barn has been standing for a long time and probably neglegted for a while, covering it would be a good idea but most of the damage has already been done to the top.
    I would be sure to check the foundation, the sills, and the corners as before mentioned. I may be way off on this but as a builder things like this look alot worse than sometimes really are. My main concearn would be debries romoval, get all of the old bad stuff cleared out a safetly as you can. On some jobs like this you have to follow your gut as to what is safe.
    I would take out the old ceiling joists and replace them first as to TIE the walls back together. maybe even a couple of 'come alongs X'sd from top to bottom here and there around the top plate to the foundation walls' would be a good idea.
    Be sure the top plates (top of the walls) are in good shape as well (probably are my thought is that they are coverd from the weather it looks like).
    If they are then think about what kind of roof you are going to put back on it, a steep roof is better but harder to build not much extra matrerial,
    * more storage if you have a good ceiling joist setup to allow a floor.* A lesser sloped roof is easier to build and repair but less storage space.
    All and all I would save this nice barn if you can do it or pay to do it, it looks good to me.
    Columbia,SC.
     
  14. FarmTrackMind

    FarmTrackMind Member

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    Dec 27, 2005
    Did anything of historical importance ever take place on your property? If so, you might be home free with a restored barn at no cost to you.