Old Barn Removal

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by sssapps, Nov 20, 2008.

  1. sssapps

    sssapps Well-Known Member

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    We have had a few offers from people to buy and remove an old barn of ours. Does anyone have any type of a contract or advice on making a deal like this go smoothly? We'd (both parties) want to set a final date to have things down and removed, etc, etc.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    Add in a liability clause so they cant sue you if injured
     

  3. Labrat407

    Labrat407 How What Where Unknown

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    Are you getting a good price on the timbers/lumber?
     
  4. Rocky Fields

    Rocky Fields Failure is not an option.

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    Hey.

    Get your money upfront. I've seen lots of amateurs get discouraged(bit off more than they can chew) and they give up after splitting too many boards.

    RF
     
  5. sssapps

    sssapps Well-Known Member

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    Do you mean a liability clause in the contract? Or in general for our insurance?

    As for price...that is another thing, we aren't exactly sure what is 'fair' for it. Is there any place to reference it and make sure it's a good deal for both parties? The barn is no longer of use to us and kind of right in the middle of everything. We have a ton of pictures...but are on dial-up, so it'd take forever for me to get them up on the website. Would anyone, if I was able to get them on our personal website, have any knowledge to give us an idea of what would be a fair price?

    We planned on getting the money up front and setting a date that they had to be done with it. I guess we'd have to make sure they understood the payment is non-refundable if they give up, huh?

    Thank you!
     
  6. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    Yes. You probably already have some coverage in your homeowners policy, but adding it to the contract will remove any liability for those tearing down the barn
     
  7. sycamore

    sycamore Well-Known Member

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    We were trying to take down a nearby barn but the owners wanted us to have our own liability insurance policy. We checked around and we would need to be a licensed contractor to get such a policy.
    A liability clause in the contract wasn't enough for their lawyers.
    It is pretty much meaningless in some states.
    Most homeowners policies don't cover this either.
    Our agent said no way, to add to that someone not far from here was taking down a barn in a similar situation to yours and died. So be very very careful who you have doing this.
    on another note we have taken down 3 barns with no contract or liability coverage but that was 10 years ago.
     
  8. happybluebird

    happybluebird Well-Known Member

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    Our old barn was destroyed in a storm. We did the clean up ourselves, stacked the wood and then sold it. While this was a different situation than what you are facing, I still learned a few things that might help.

    Taking down old barns is dangerous, so many things can go wrong. So, I would second the advice about protecting yourself in case they would get hurt.

    It is VERY hard work. It would be good if the people you have taking the barn down aren't new to the task.

    There will be unusable wood/wood they don't want. Whether it be because the wood is rotten or busted or whatever. We burned the junk wood. 100 year old barn wood makes some huge very hot bonfires :) So, ask what they plan to do with that....burn it...take it to a dump...make sure you know and approve of what and where and how they plan to deal with what they don't want.

    NAILS omg I don't think we will ever get all the nails up. We bought a magnetic roller and that really helped get a bunch of them up. Be aware that they will be a problem. Either ask whoever does it to roll for nails afterward or be prepared to do it yourself. But you'll never get them all lol

    What kind of floor does the barn have? If it is just dirt your in great shape. Ours was part dirt, part very thick very broken up concrete, and part logs with wood flooring on top. And there was concrete block fondation (the original rock had been replaced at one time). We needed to rebuild on the site so we had get all that up too. We had to hire a guy with heavy equipment to do that part. They dug a huge hole, put all of it in there and covered it up.

    We got a thousand dollars for the wood. Hand hewned beams, barn siding, the log rafters, 4x4 posts. We had it all stacked and seperated. The guys who bought it had torn down lots of old barns, but I don't know how much they paid to do that. It would have been nice to have someone come in and do that, but with that barn being such a blown down mess it was a very dangerous undertaking. I don't know if someone would have come in and cleaned it up for us. Truth be told I'd have given that wood away if someone would have offered to clean up the mess ;) So, keep that in mind when you are coming up with a price. If you don't want the barn there anymore and they are willing to take it down for you and pay you then I'd say you are a lucky person. :cowboy:
     
  9. Common Tator

    Common Tator Uber Tuber

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    If I have strangers doing work on my property, I make them provide me with a certificate of insurance, listing me as an additional named insured, and I make sure that all of the workers he has on my property are employees covered under workers compensation.
     
  10. Rocky Fields

    Rocky Fields Failure is not an option.

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    Hey.

    I've done farm salvage work for the past ten years. In my work as a mason, I travel around quite a bit and uncover "opportunities".

    Post your pics to your website. Post dimensions,wood type, and other info that wouldn't be obtainable from photos. After that, I'll give you an opinion of value.

    RF
     
  11. JW Parker

    JW Parker Well-Known Member

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    My granddaughter's husband does some of that kind of work but he is a long way from your area. He is only 24 yrs. old with only 6 yrs. of experence so he is still learning. He makes good money and hasn't had any of his people hurt yet. He is heavy with insurance because of what might happen. Sometimes he pays them money and sometimes they pay him. There are all kinds of deals. He finished one job May 08 that he started in November 07. It was a large two car with a room on the back and an upstears. It was on a concrete slab and had about 90 feet of black top drive. He had to turn that into lawn and they payed him good and he made more money with the lumber.
     
  12. sssapps

    sssapps Well-Known Member

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    This barn is still in very good shape and very use-able...we just don't have a use for it...and well, it'd be nice to have it gone.

    We had a lot going on shortly after I posted, so it took me a bit (partnered with having VERY slow dial-up to post pictures..) to get the photos up. But, they are up - www.ryuns.com/barn.htm I will post dimensions and such on the page when hubby sends them to me!

    People we have had inquire are all experienced in it...and many of them run it as a business and want to take a look at it when they'd be in the area on another project.

    And nails...we are on an old farm, so EVERYWHERE we dig we dig up nails and bricks, so that would be nothing new to us! lol. :D

    Just something we are looking at.

    Thanks everyone!
     
  13. sssapps

    sssapps Well-Known Member

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    ..having a couple of problems getting the pictures to finish posting..will update when then finally finish and show up...sorry about that!
     
  14. zant

    zant Well-Known Member

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    I knew a contractor in Me. that did this work...he was fully insured..had a good crew and would take down entire structure,numbering everything...did excellant cleanup work too...he had people in Ca.that wanted a NE style barn and would pay trans,and rebuilding costs...Make sure they have full ins and will clean up.
     
  15. sssapps

    sssapps Well-Known Member

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  16. Rocky Fields

    Rocky Fields Failure is not an option.

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    Hey.

    $800-$1200 in northern WI...higher price is if the "tin" roof panels are leak free and reuseable(ie: no rust holes/rot-thru).

    RF
     
  17. Shawn

    Shawn Well-Known Member

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    Here are my thoughts as I have been looking to find one to take down, but I need the land to put one on too.

    Get CASH upfront from them. Hold this as payment and a deposit until complete. Say you are going to ask $5000 for the barn, but you want $10,000 up front. You will give them the deposit back upon completion and clean up.

    Make sure you are listed as an additional insured and have a copy of their certificate sent to you. Also make sure they carry workman's compensation insurance for the people doing the labor.

    Have a contract and state that they are to take down and leave the site clean to the foundation.

    They may want to bring in machinery to help tear the structure or lift the beams. Make sure you put into the contract what they can and can not do. If they bring in too large of trucks you may end up with ruts. If so make sure they have to back fill these with clean fill.

    Set a time frame for completion. If they are not done by that date, tell them you will hold an amount from the deposit out each day until complete. Say $250 per day.

    Make sure you want to work with the people taking the unit down.

    Just some of my random thoughts.
     
  18. unioncreek

    unioncreek Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Are you really sure you want to get ride of it? If I have an out building like that and was not using it at the time I would keep it. It looks to be in pretty good shape and it would cost quite a bit if you ever wanted to put up anything similar to that. If I was to take it down I would keep the wood for further building projects.

    Bobg
     
  19. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    Its certainly a shame that a barn that nice is going to be destroyed.

    Why not just keep it or rent it? At $300 a month, the total in 10 years would be $36,000, and you would still have the barn as an asset.

    I would give my eye teeth for a barn like that.

    Clove
     
  20. amjo

    amjo Member

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    I would also kill to have a barn like that on my property. Makes me very jealous.

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