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Discussion Starter #1
We need to put down more grass seed in the pasture for the goats. The pasture they are not on right now. Do we have to do some kind of tilling or can we just go out there and throw it out willy-nilly and let it come up?
 

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Be powerful. No other option exists.
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My goats won't eat grass. :grump:
 

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Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....?
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Youll get better results if you till, but in most cases its not necessary. It will help to mow it or graze it down low before you reseed
 

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I believe you can cover the seed with straw till it comes up if you don't have too much clay in the soil. But if you can wet the soil down and loosen the top 1-2" with a heavy duty rake that would be better. so, loosen soil as much as you can, spread the seed, water and cover with straw. that might work.
 

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I've seen local ranchers have good luck with "bellygrinding" seed over bare patches.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The problem with our farm is that we don't have any equipment at all to do any of these tilling or raking applications other than just our backs and hand rakes, and we have 6 acres here. I think what we might have to do is just go out maybe after it rains good and heavy and throw the seed out, try to cover it somewhat with some straw, and then just hope for the best, maybe water it down the next day or something. Do you think we would have any luck doing it this way?
 

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Here is a couple of comments:

July/August are worst time of year to try and start grass/legumes.

Not sure of your goal but here are answers for two goals.

Raising livestock for meat (growth) then you need to plant legumes like white clover/red clover/maybe alfalfa.

Raising livestock for pets (maintain) then you need to grow mostly grasses. (I still would plant white clover for fixing N)

Would not mono-crop not matter what. In any case, since you don't have any equipment just livestock you can still get a good planting by doing the following.

You are in Iowa, so do this work in mid to late September. Let livestock graze area heavily. I suggest using electric netting from Premier1 to make small paddocks to allow for Overstocking, which forces heavy grazing. Once they have been in there for a day or two (maybe right away depend on how overstock you can make the paddock) broadcast seed over existing plants. Let the livestock feet push it into the ground while they graze. Then keep the livestock off for the early part of Spring to allow for new seedlings to gain a foot hold. But then in late Spring put the livestock back on to eat down the established grasses/weeds. This allows light to get to the new seedlings again. Then continue to graze using good rotational grazing methods.

If you don't have a way to force overstocking then I would broadcast half the seeds in September and the other half in March. Let the livestock graze during both periods...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Maybe I just used the wrong word, instead of grass, maybe I should have put browse? I may have just worded it wrong. My goats have slicked off their pasture, and there was grass in it, along with tons of other weeds, but I can put other stuff out there for them, other than just grass, so the question would still be the same.

Snake oil: Drill it in? Not familiar with this. Is this doable by hand? So far I like the idea that FreeRanger is talking about, but I'll accept all ideas. Not ready to do anything yet, except read about what I should do and when.

Thanks!
 

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A drill is a piece of equipment that needs a tractor to pull it.

If you want to do this manually, frost seeding is a good option. Broadcast your seed during (what you hope is) the last snow in spring. I know a few people who do this and it seems to work for them.

Guy I bought our first dairy goats from had his pasture planted in trefoil. The goats liked it and it holds up well to pasturing.
 

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If I'm not tilling the soil I wait for winter freezing to crack open the soil.Then when the temps are starting to get close to the 30 s I use a hand cranked seeder to broadcast a mixture of red and white clover and timothy with some alfalfa.keep livestock off untill the grass is 6 "or 7 ".
My Lamanchas eat off all the weeds and junk while the Boers love the grasses.The La Boers or Bo Manchas (the cross) are really weird in what they will or won't eat :shrug:.
Chas
 

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Either way you want to keep your Goats off it until it gets good growth or your wasting seed.

big rockpile
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Okay, will do. David, did you get my PM about your phone number?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
We have one great big old Troy built tiller that just jerks my husbands shoulders all around, which is why we are going to mulching our garden this year and then hopefully in the spring we will have no reason to till and can garden without the tiller.
 

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Nope - the pigs... fence off a small area (quarter acre), put the piggers in it for 3-4 days, broadcast the seed, spread shelled corn around the entire area, let them stomp/root the seed in for a day, repeat...
 
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