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Animal Addict
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recall a thread on here not so long ago about someone who had their goat mediacally put down. She said that her goat was hollering after the inital tranquilizer was given. I expected Sandy to go peacefully in my arms, just fall asleep like my horse did several years ago. Instead, she was hollering after the initial shot, very out of it but still hollering. Then it took 3 times the normal dose of the other agent to finally get her heart to stop beating, during which she continued to yell. The vet said she was quite a fighter with a strong heart. I was there, holding my girl, tears streaming as she held on...and on...this was a truly horrific experience. The vet said she felt nothing, but I have to wonder. After all we had been through, for her to go out this way was doubly heartbreaking. It took almost 15 minutes until it was over. Words cannot express my horror and heartbreak at what should have been a peaceful end.

I do not think my husband could have shot her, he was too attached as well. What I am asking is, is there something in the goat's genetic makeup that makes it so hard on them to go out this way? Have you all had equally bad experiences? If this should happen again, I am leaning towards having someone just come out and shoot the goat verses ever seeing this again. But I wanted to be with her, I had fought by her side for so long and I was the one she was comfortable with. I stupidly thought I could just hold her, stroke her, and ease her over the Bridge so she wouldn't be alone and scared. I do not think I will ever forget this experience, and am so heartbroken that after she fought so hard, she suffered the worst at what should have been a peaceful ending. I feel like a complete failure, I failed her when she needed me most.

Please share your experiences. How could she have been yelling if she felt nothing?! Why did my 1200 pound horse pass without a hitch, just falling asleep, and she needed 3 times the normal dose of agent with nothing peaceful about it?!

Please, I need to know that it was all reflex and I did not subject her to a horrible horrible end. Or, I need to know the truth so I can make a wiser decision next time.
 

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She may have just been struggling to maintain control.

After my hernia surgery I passed out on the way home. As I was passing out Mom said that I was flailing around and moaning loudly. I wasn't in any pain. I think all the noise and flailing was just because I was fighting to maintain conciousness. I don't remember anything until I woke up in ER. It was harder on Mom than it was me.
 

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My goat had the same reaction to a tranqualizer when she needed minor surgery done on an abscess.Now I wonder if the tranqualizer used just causes that reaction in goats because it wasn't designed for them, goats being somewhat rare compared to sheep and other cattle.
 

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If this happened to me I would have post traumatic stress disorder. My God how horrible for you beccachow. I work at a vet (dog/cat) and have been on the scene of many, many euthanasia's and have never encountered anything but a peaceful passing. I would expect the same if I had to do it with any of my other critters (goats/horses). I have heard of dog/cat euthanasia gone bad...but that was because the animal wasn't tranqualized properly first. So I guess that's my question...was she given enough tranq first? and then the lethal injection? Also, with cats & dogs, when we use gas to do surgery or some procedure...sometimes right before they go out they struggle a bit to stay awake and may try to shake their head or get real squirmy...but it's a real short time and probably a lot like what Fishhead described. I'm so sorry it was not peaceful for you and I will be watching this thread because I would like to know if it's a "goat" thing...I certainly wouldn't have expected that at all :( Gosh, if it wasn't bad enough for you already. More hugs
 

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:hugs: I have been watching your posts. So sorry it had to end this way. I don't know about your questions, but I would guess she felt nothing after the tranquilizer went in. Sometimes even people can react violently, for surgery, so they give more tranq or a stronger one.
 

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I think she should have gotten more of the tranq before the potassium shot.
A possibility- the first shot slipped and wasn't totally I.V.
Also, some animals tolerate tranquilizers much more than others.
My vet had a terrible time sedating one of my ponies before he was gelded.
She wouldn't proceed until he was completely under.
She is a very caring person.
 

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Nubian dairy goat breeder
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this must have been very traumatic for you.
maybe if your husband would have witnessed this, the next time he will be able to shot? the bulled placed at the right spot, takes the animal out instantly.
no chemical residue that goes in the ground either.
yes i agree, the injection might not have been placed correct and the deadly injection is very painful.
 

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P.S. It isn't your fault! You did the best you could.
I can guarantee you, you were a comfort to her!
I always appreciate an owner who will stay to the end.
It's very tough, but our creatures really need it.
It eases them, even in the worst circumstances.
 

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A & N Lazy Pond Farm
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I am sorry you had a bad experience with putting her down. I just went through the same with a older dog and she never new anything, went peacefully in my arms.

We have had to shoot several goats and trust me it is not any prettier. DH placed the shot very carefully and even though dead the body will still have movement in the legs and it will appear as if the goat is thrashing and in pain. Just thought I would let you know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Is that what the blue stuff is? Potassium? I didn't recall the vet giving the horse anything so brightly colored. So I guess the means of death is a potassium overload to the heart?

What makes it even worse was he had a devil of a time finding the vein. He stuck her about 4 times...she didn't flinch for that, though, she had already had the trank. It seems as though it took forever for the trank to work, too. The vet didn't want to proceed to step two until she was completely groggy. The whole thing was horrible.
 

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My kids have hooves
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Oh, oh, I can't tell you how sorry I am to hear this. You and Sandy fought so hard together to have to deal with anything but a serene ending :(

Just know I'm thinking of you.
 

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The underdosing to even keep goats alive is common in more pet type vets, it is understandable that they would underdose this also.

Perhaps instead of relying on husbands or vets, you should find a way you are comfortable with in putting down your own stock. This way you know it is done humanly and quickly, not having to wait on vet to be open, or a husband to be home. Vicki
 

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Broken Dreamer
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Oh how horrible. I used to work at a vet's and I echo what's already been said, she should have been sedated to the point of unconsciousness. Sometimes a WEAK heart can make the process go more slowly, I don't know if that's the case here though, and certainly shouldn't have lasted more than a minute or two. If this is how all your vet's goat euthanasias go, the process needs to be changed...
 

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I have heard that some animals will simply react this way. I don't know why, but I know some have witnesses horses being put down and having a violent reaction.

I'm sorry it was so bad, but she doesn't know anything now.
 

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Enabler!
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I am so sorry you had to put your goat down.
I had to put a day old triplet down and the vet gave him an overdose of barbituates ( sp?). If he struggled or cried I do not know because they took him into the next room. In dogs and cats the meds are pink and I never saw the color they used on the little buckling.
I think even if they go peacefully it is hard, but worse when you see the poor thing crying and fighting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I think based on all I am reading here that next time I will get a neighbor to come and shoot the animal. This was just too hard on her, and me.

Thank you all for your input and advice.

I don't shoot, my hubby does, and all our neighbors do. I am too soft to be able to do it, anyway. An unattached third party would be the answer.

Thanks again!
 

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Kathy
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I had to have a potbellied pig put down and she didnt go easily either and the vet and I were both crying. He said sometimes they dont like losing control and he was a large animal vet too. I wont do that again as now if its got to be done I just suck it up and get it done. I dont wait for my DH or son to do it anymore. I just DO IT! The horse we had to have put down didnt feel a thing as she was way out of it and it was over really fast. Some animals just react differently to drugs. A bullet is cheaper than a vet call anyday and thats what I have to do DH wont do it as he will keep putting it off. So its basically left to me to do. Its amazing what you can do if you have to. And yes I cry the whole time I have to do it. So sorry for your loss...
 

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Student of goatology.
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I used to work for a vet and have seen many pets put down. As an animal owner, I've had several animals put down; dogs, goats, horses. Never once did I ever see one take more than 3 seconds to shut down completely. NO PAIN and no struggling at all. And only one time, was one of them sedated beforehand which was my old Boxer/Lab mix. I don't know what went wrong with your experience but it seems to me like a rare occurance. I'm very sorry it went so badly for you.
 
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